Making Of A Historian 공개
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Show notes and more at historian.live!I recorded this way back in September when I had ambitious dreams of doing a whole series on the history of British social clubs, but I’ve been unfortunately wiped with work and with the emotional toll of American politics lately, so I was never able to get the series off the ground. But what we have is a fanta…
 
You really need to check out show notes at historian.live for this episode. We have so many videos, images and book recommendations for this one. Also check out the mailing list at makingofahistorian.substack.com and you can get an email whenever I make a thing.This week I’m joined by my colleague, Dr. Andrea Horbinski, a PhD from Berkeley who now …
 
For show notes, check the website historian.live.Get email reminders of when I make stuff: makingofahistorian.substack.comSo this episode is an absolute blast. I talk with my old friend Brendan McElmeel—yes, another Brendan M—about his dissertation research on love during the thaw years of the USSR. But before I gush to you about how good the inter…
 
This week I talk with Susan Lanzoni who talks about her book tracing the history of empathy. Empathy has, over the past 100 years, changed a lot in meaning. It started out as one of these untranslatable weird German words that art historians would throw around to discuss the mystical depths of aesthetic experience: einfühlung. This was the ability …
 
Our website, historian.live, has links, book lists, and more!So if you’re like me, you’ve used the phrase ‘object lesson’ to mean some kind of telling real-world example of something. The new parent waking up at 4:30 in the morning to get work done, for example, is an object lesson about the current childcare crisis. But the phrase used to mean som…
 
For show notes, links, and book lists, check out our website at historian.live.Today I talk with Professor Michael Schoeppner, Assistant Professor of History at University of Maine, Farmington, about his book Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship and Diplomacy in Antebellum America. I was initially drawn to talk with Professor Schoep…
 
Full show notes, including pictures, further reading, and my PATREON are available at the website, historian.live.I’m honored to have Professor David Beerling on the podcast this week, to talk about his book Making Eden, which is a deep history of the evolution of land plants. We’ve talked a bit about environmental history in the past, but I’ve bee…
 
Check out full show notes--including book lists on our website at historian.liveThis week we discuss Tom Almeroth-Williams’ book, City of Beasts—now out in a reasonably priced paperback—which looks at how people and animals worked together in 18th century London. We talk about cows, horses, the great geese herds of Christmastime, and why people in …
 
For show notes, and information on supporting the show, check out our website at historian.liveThe Nestucca River has been home to salmon and salmon fishers for thousands of years. In this summer-vacation themed episode, I talk with Professor Joseph E Taylor about the 19th and 20th century history of this unique salmon fishery. Combining labor hist…
 
In this episode I talk with Professor Brent Sirota about church history in the long 18th century. People have portrayed religion in the long 18th century as a little boring and staid. In the 17th century you had a civil war over religion in Britain. In the 19th century you had evangelicals, Darwin, and the Oxford Movement. But in the 18th century y…
 
In this episode I talk with Stanford Professor Kathryn Olivarius about her research on Yellow Fever in antebellum New Orleans. Yellow Fever was bad. It killed around half of all the people who caught it. Why then did young immigrants to New Orleans seeking to make their fortune sometimes willingly infect themselves with the disease? Olivarius’ rese…
 
If you like the show, give us money on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/makingofahistorianIn this episode, I sit down with Craig Johnson, “the most returningest” guest in the history of this podcast. I ask him to talk about historical parallels to our current quarantine, and the conversation quickly goes in a direction I didn’t expect. Listen! It’s…
 
If you like the show can now support us on Patreon! (patreon.com/makingofahistorian)This week we have returning guest Kyle Jackson—who last came on to tell us about the Panama Canal. Today he’s coming on to practice his orals. I ask him to tell us to give us three different dates when we could start the beginning of US history. It’s a great discuss…
 
We're inaugurating a new podcast interview series during this weird time of isolation with recurring guest, Varsha Venkatasubramanian. Varsha is studying for her comprehensive exams in like TWO WEEKS and she was gracious enough to join us to talk about what it's like to read a thousand books when you don't have library access. We discuss the histor…
 
This episode, we talk about beer. Beer isn’t just an enjoyable beverage. You’ll learn:How beer started off as part of a complete breakfastHow capitalist brewers destroyed the way of life of the village alewifeHow IPA became cool for 19th century hipstersAnd more!Check out show notes at historian.live and we now have a Patreon at patreon.com/makingo…
 
In this--another short episode!--we talk about a group of workers who are often written out of the story of the Industrial Revolution. The mostly female ranks of domestic servants, who cleaned houses, made food, educated children, made medicine, and generally made the home a homey place to be. When historians usually deal with servants, they treat …
 
We're been on a bit of a hiatus in this series. Who knew it'd be hard to juggle teaching, raising a kid, and writing a dissertation? But given the shelter in place of COVID-19, I thought it would be a good time to resume the podcast and try to get through the rest of the episodes in this series.Warning: I'm joined in this podcast by a special guest…
 
For more detailed shownotes, go to our website at historian.liveThis episode is a co-production with the Journal of History of Ideas Blog’s podcast, In Theory. If you like this show’s format, you’ll love In Theory. Also be sure to check out the JHI Blog itself, which consistently produces some of the best academic writing for a general audience out…
 
We're back after an extended break with a great episode. In this episode I walk with my colleague Christopher Lawson about two really big things that happen in the 20th century: deindustrialisation and neoliberalism. These are hard topics to deal with on their own, and Christopher tells the story of how they both interact by telling the story of Sc…
 
In this episode I speak with PhD Candidate Soufu Yin about Chinese political culture. If you're anything like me, your idea of China is pretty monolithic: politics is all about emperors, bureaucrats, and the civil service examination. But Shoufu argues that much of this is a trick of perspective, and that when we look at Chinese political culture w…
 
In my conversation this week with my colleague Amada Beltran, we talk about some of the biggest problems in history: the state, modernity, and how on earth do historians come to understand the past? Amada talks about how her careful study of wills showed her a key moment in the relationship between the family, the church, and the modern state in 19…
 
This week we have on PhD Candidate B.K. Williams, who talks to us about the history of Indonesia after the Second World War. If you're like me, you probably can't keep your Sukarnos and your Suhartos straight. But B.K. helps us look at the rich story of war, independence, repression, and development. With a walk-on part from Mr. Richard Nixon. Both…
 
If you like the show, subscribe! Give us a rating on iTunes! Tell your in-laws!This episode we learn all about the Lebanese Civil War, which lasted a whopping FIFTEEN YEARS from 1975 to 1990. If you know anything about the Lebanese Civil War, you know that it is complicated. It’s sometimes presented as a sectarian conflict—Christians against Muslim…
 
In this episode we talk to returning guest, Craig Johnson, about the history of right wing politics. Craig tells us how the right wing developed after the French Revolution, why historians tend to ignore it, and how to understand fascism.Follow Craig on Twitter (https://twitter.com/HistOfTheRight) and Medium (https://medium.com/@HistOfTheRight/)…
 
You HAVE to check the shownotes for this one. Go to https://www.historian.live/home/2019/4/17/episode-130-battle-raps-of-the-high-middle-ages RIGHT NOWThere? Good. Our guest today Dr. Jenna Phillips has been kind enough to give us a great series of musically accompaniments to today's talk.Dr. Phillips tells us about a fascinating form of singing in…
 
This is such a great episode. I am proud to welcome Professor Ted Underwood, author of the new book, Distant Horizons. Professor Underwood uses computers to understand long-term, large-scale changes in literature. We don't talk about the methodological stuff, though--instead Professor Underwood gives us a really rich history of how literature over …
 
This episode I sit down with Berkeley Professor of Latin American and Atlantic History Elena Schneider to talk about her fantastic new book, the Occupation of Havana. It's a fantastic conversation. We talk about one of the big wars of the 18th century--the Seven Years War. And we focus in on one part of the war: the British siege on the Cuban city …
 
This week's episode, I talk about the history of chemistry with historian of science Henry Schmidt. We focus on one of the most important elements: nitrogen. Nitrogen is incredibly important for plant and animal growth. It also makes up over three quarters of the air. How did people figure out what nitrogen was? And once they did figure out what it…
 
This week I bring you a wild conversation with my friend S. Prashant Kumar, who's writing a dissertation in the history of time itself. To tell this story he's looking at a bunch of cosmological inquiries in India. We talk about the beginning of the story, this telling moment when a smart young man on the make, Reuben Burrow, went to India to make …
 
"Every generation of historians is really just trying to understand their parents," my colleague Sarah Stoller tells me in his week's interview. And that's what we do--we go back to the 70s, 80s and 90s to learn about the history of working parents.Check out show notes at historian.live저자 Making of a Historian
 
In this episode, we talk with PhD Student Varsha Venkatasubramanian about the history of dams in the 20th century. Dams became symbols of development for both capitalist and communist regimes: they provided electricity, water, and big building projects. Then in the 1980s, spurred by a controversial dam project in India, the popular perception of da…
 
We were going to save this one for when the new royal baby came, but I loved the conversation so much I just couldn't wait. In this episode I talk with Dr. Michelle Beer about early modern queenship. Now I used to think that Queens were relatively powerless, but in this conversation Dr. Beer sets me straight. Queens had a lot of power, and used tha…
 
To celebrate the release of the latest expansion for Civilization 6, Gathering Storm, we're going to be talking about the Panama Canal. The Panama Canal is World Wonder introduced in Civ 6: Gathering Storm that lets you build an exceedingly long canal. On this episode I talk to historian Kyle Jackson about how the Panama Canal got built. You'll lea…
 
This marks the beginning of a new season for the show. We’ll be doing a series of interviews with historians at every stage of their career: early career grad students, folks on the job market, and honest-to-goodness tenured historians.In this episode, we are graciously joined by Professor of History and South and Southeast Asan Studies, Peter Zino…
 
One of the BIG THINGS these days are the ‘Digital Humanities’—a set of approaches that bring the power of computers to traditional humanistic questions. I was asked to present an introductory talk about Digital Humanities: here is a version of that talk.The problem is that people aren’t really sure just what the Digital Humanities are. The joke is …
 
In this episode, we look at how the history of inequality affects the stories we tell about the Anthropocene.Reading list:Trevor Jackson on Inequality (https://jhiblog.org/2018/04/04/review-essay-after-piketty-sutch-scheidel-and-the-new-study-of-inequality/)Lucas Chancel and Thomas Piketty, 2015. “Carbon and Inequality from Kyoto to Paris.”Schiedl,…
 
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