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Are you Ready to Quit Your Job or Just Mix it up? Side-Gig? - (W9:D1) Debt Free Millionaire Podcast

43:33
 
공유
 

Manage episode 418119099 series 3557376
Zack, with the Debt Free Millionaire Brand and With the Debt Free Millionaire Brand에서 제공하는 콘텐츠입니다. 에피소드, 그래픽, 팟캐스트 설명을 포함한 모든 팟캐스트 콘텐츠는 Zack, with the Debt Free Millionaire Brand and With the Debt Free Millionaire Brand 또는 해당 팟캐스트 플랫폼 파트너가 직접 업로드하고 제공합니다. 누군가가 귀하의 허락 없이 귀하의 저작물을 사용하고 있다고 생각되는 경우 여기에 설명된 절차를 따르실 수 있습니다 https://ko.player.fm/legal.

Simplified Explanation: Statistics have shown that Millennials and those younger will change their jobs four times in the first decade of working; only 29% of them feel engaged at their workplace; and 50% are dissatisfied with their work (Gallup polls, 2021). Adults are prone to searching out new jobs if they don’t like their work or side gigs if they want more work to pay the bills. This is not to demonize the work that employees are doing but instead to note that they can become disengaged, and they want something new.
Real Life: Everyone in America is able to quit their job and move on to another position that they are qualified for. The job market is very fluid, but if you are not qualified for a certain job or you don’t have the talent or skills, you will need to be trained for it, or continue working where you are. If you are not educated and skilled in the right area to get the job of your dreams, then that is up to you to change. Remember, you want another job and someone else would be happy to fill your position. If you want to change jobs, try these thoughtful questions before making the dive into a new career. The truth is, if you are dissatisfied with the job you have, it may not be the job that is disengaging you; so try this method to see if a potential job change is right for you.

  1. What is it about the old/current job that you do not like? Can you/how can you make it more engaging?
  2. Are you qualified for another position in the same company, and would that be engaging?
  3. Is it the work that dissatisfies or disengages you, or is it something else (like the company culture)?
  4. Will you feel joy in the next position - working for that company or another company - or will they all be a drag for you, because you aren’t doing what you want?
  5. What is it you want to do? Are you qualified and have the talent to accomplish that job?
  6. Would you be more satisfied if you had a side gig to mix things up, or is it that you just don’t want to work?
  7. Is it the money you are making, the lack of a cause in the company, or do you just want something new?
  8. Again, will you be satisfied with something in the future, or will you always be unhappy?

After you have answered these questions, you will have a better understanding of what is inside of you and why you feel disengaged or dissatisfied with your current job. It may not be the job that dissatisfies you. After answering these questions honestly, if you still want a new job, try asking the following questions. Then take these actions to begin the search for a new position:

  1. What would you love to do at work? Remember, if you make your hobby your work, you may become dissatisfied with your hobby, and the thing you used to escape from your stress is now the thing you need to escape from. All that or you may begin to enjoy what you do and you may very much enjoy your new job.
  2. Are there positions out there that can satisfy the needs you have? Search the web for job boards that may fulfill the need(s) that you have inside.
  3. Did you find one? If they are out there, the next thing you should do is go interview someone that is doing that same job right now. If you can find someone that is dissatisfied and someone that is satisfied with the job, you will get a more well-rounded point of view. You would hate to take another job and then immediately find you are disengaged there as well. Remember that every time you change jobs and then list that in your resume for the next position, your next employer will see that, especially if they check references by calling up your previous work. The more you jump around the more your next boss will wonder if you will do that to them. There is a certain amount of movement that won’t spook an employer, but just make sure you won’t be moving around forever. A company loses thousands on training most employees, and the U.S. Economy loses billions each year on lost production; so do your research beforehand. Remember that if you move up in the company, that is a great sign to your next employer of your potential. If you answer that you were dissatisfied with your last job, in an interview, that can be a sign that you will likely be dissatisfied in this new job or if you are honest and open, giving them reasons why you left, may give them insight on how to keep you engaged and solid in this new position.
  4. What requirements will it take to fulfill this job, or even to get past the interview process against others that are equally (or even more) qualified for this position? Will others be more prepared and qualified for this position? What education do you need to have? What job training or experience do you need? Can you/should you get this training and education before applying for this type of job?
  5. Are you willing to go back to school to get this job? Is there on-the-job training? Or does the company want a “blank slate,” to train their own way and so doesn’t want you to be trained too much by someone else? You may be able to entice the interviewer that you are not trained or educated for this job but that you are a “blank slate,” ready to be trained their way. Remember that the employer is human, like you, but is looking for the best fit for this position, out of all the applicants. Are you the best person to fill this need?

Now, after doing your research into the new position, do not quit your day job. You want to make a smooth transition from your previous job into a new job. You also do not know if you will find a new job right away. You may start interviewing with these other positions while still working at your day job. This also shows the new employer that they are not hiring someone that was fired or had issues finding work. If they know they have someone that is already wanted by another employer, then you are playing on their jealousy that they want this employee just as much, if not more, and will pay to entice you to come over. So, do not enter an interview with a sense of desperation. When looking for a job, try taking these steps first:

  1. Look to see if there are jobs that will satisfy your needs and wants and see what they provide for salary and benefits. Do some research into the company culture and see if you are a good fit.
  2. Talk to the employees that would be working with you. There is nothing wrong with you entering the interview knowing anything and everything about the company and their employees. You could even go as far as to invite one of the employees to go out to lunch with you so you can “pick their brain” (ask them every question imaginable so you can determine if it is a good fit before you join). Remember also that just like you want to research the job opportunity, the employer wants you to know as much as possible beforehand. No employer wants you to join their ranks just to leave it after being trained.
  3. Find out what type of qualifications you will need to work there and take the time to take the classes and training necessary to obtain those qualifications. Remember that these classes won’t just help you in a future position but may help you in the position you are currently working. They could also line you up for a promotion in your current job, which may end up engaging you. Tell your current boss that you are taking new classes. Don’t tell them that you are looking into getting a new job. Employers love when their workers are getting more education because it will only help with their current position. They see this as an opportunity, and if they are wise, they will offer you a higher position or pay more to keep a well-educated employee working for them.
  4. Before going too far with searching out a new job, ask your employer what it would take to get a promotion or higher position in the company. If there is no upward momentum or path you can take, this is a good sign to find new employment. If there is upward momentum, this may be just what you need to satisfy your needs and get you reengaged. Even when you get a job offer, go back to your employer and tell them that you received a job offer but because you are loyal, you would like to stay here (if you do want to stay) if there is a way they can match the job offer or give you a promotion with something that will satisfy you.

Remember that anyone can ask for a promotion, but the ones to receive them are those willing to work for it. Are you willing to work for it? If so, ask your manager what you need to do to be promoted. Take their recommendations to heart. If you take those classes needed, show more initiative, or do what is required to advance, then you deserve that promotion. If they don’t give it to you at that point, then you have every right (and almost an obligation) to leave for a better job. If you are educated and ready for the position that you want, it is time to write a rock-solid resume. A resume is a summary of your work history, education, and even certifications, publications, and organizations you belong to. Here are a few tips when writing a resume:

Resume, in general:

  • Keep it all to one page. If it becomes too long, the reviewer will not read it.
  • You can use a template to get started, but remember to personalize it to speak more to who you are.
  • Resumes are often read by computers these days; templates can help get past the bots. Any system these days that takes resumes normally has a program to sort through viable resumes.
  • Keep it simple and uniform. Make sure it looks the same throughout, with font and spacing.
  • While simple, you want it to stand out. Make it unique, in your own way, but be careful about being too unique and giving too much information.
  • Make your contact information prominent and put it at the top, so they don’t need to search.
  • Design it to be skimmable, hitting all the highlights, without lengthy sentences.
  • Seek guidance from a professional - the money you may spend will be worth it.
  • Use active language, like “accomplished,” “achieved,” and “earned.”
  • Choose standard margins and spacing in the format, so it doesn’t look too busy.

Objective:

  • This is not needed unless you are making a large jump between different career fields; some employers do like it as a summary, but most know what type of job you are looking for, so it’s not needed.
  • If you are to write one, make sure that you focus it on each specific position.
  • Don’t use “I” or “me.” Make the objective very short - 2 lines - and straight to the point.

Job History:

  continue reading

57 에피소드

Artwork
icon공유
 
Manage episode 418119099 series 3557376
Zack, with the Debt Free Millionaire Brand and With the Debt Free Millionaire Brand에서 제공하는 콘텐츠입니다. 에피소드, 그래픽, 팟캐스트 설명을 포함한 모든 팟캐스트 콘텐츠는 Zack, with the Debt Free Millionaire Brand and With the Debt Free Millionaire Brand 또는 해당 팟캐스트 플랫폼 파트너가 직접 업로드하고 제공합니다. 누군가가 귀하의 허락 없이 귀하의 저작물을 사용하고 있다고 생각되는 경우 여기에 설명된 절차를 따르실 수 있습니다 https://ko.player.fm/legal.

Simplified Explanation: Statistics have shown that Millennials and those younger will change their jobs four times in the first decade of working; only 29% of them feel engaged at their workplace; and 50% are dissatisfied with their work (Gallup polls, 2021). Adults are prone to searching out new jobs if they don’t like their work or side gigs if they want more work to pay the bills. This is not to demonize the work that employees are doing but instead to note that they can become disengaged, and they want something new.
Real Life: Everyone in America is able to quit their job and move on to another position that they are qualified for. The job market is very fluid, but if you are not qualified for a certain job or you don’t have the talent or skills, you will need to be trained for it, or continue working where you are. If you are not educated and skilled in the right area to get the job of your dreams, then that is up to you to change. Remember, you want another job and someone else would be happy to fill your position. If you want to change jobs, try these thoughtful questions before making the dive into a new career. The truth is, if you are dissatisfied with the job you have, it may not be the job that is disengaging you; so try this method to see if a potential job change is right for you.

  1. What is it about the old/current job that you do not like? Can you/how can you make it more engaging?
  2. Are you qualified for another position in the same company, and would that be engaging?
  3. Is it the work that dissatisfies or disengages you, or is it something else (like the company culture)?
  4. Will you feel joy in the next position - working for that company or another company - or will they all be a drag for you, because you aren’t doing what you want?
  5. What is it you want to do? Are you qualified and have the talent to accomplish that job?
  6. Would you be more satisfied if you had a side gig to mix things up, or is it that you just don’t want to work?
  7. Is it the money you are making, the lack of a cause in the company, or do you just want something new?
  8. Again, will you be satisfied with something in the future, or will you always be unhappy?

After you have answered these questions, you will have a better understanding of what is inside of you and why you feel disengaged or dissatisfied with your current job. It may not be the job that dissatisfies you. After answering these questions honestly, if you still want a new job, try asking the following questions. Then take these actions to begin the search for a new position:

  1. What would you love to do at work? Remember, if you make your hobby your work, you may become dissatisfied with your hobby, and the thing you used to escape from your stress is now the thing you need to escape from. All that or you may begin to enjoy what you do and you may very much enjoy your new job.
  2. Are there positions out there that can satisfy the needs you have? Search the web for job boards that may fulfill the need(s) that you have inside.
  3. Did you find one? If they are out there, the next thing you should do is go interview someone that is doing that same job right now. If you can find someone that is dissatisfied and someone that is satisfied with the job, you will get a more well-rounded point of view. You would hate to take another job and then immediately find you are disengaged there as well. Remember that every time you change jobs and then list that in your resume for the next position, your next employer will see that, especially if they check references by calling up your previous work. The more you jump around the more your next boss will wonder if you will do that to them. There is a certain amount of movement that won’t spook an employer, but just make sure you won’t be moving around forever. A company loses thousands on training most employees, and the U.S. Economy loses billions each year on lost production; so do your research beforehand. Remember that if you move up in the company, that is a great sign to your next employer of your potential. If you answer that you were dissatisfied with your last job, in an interview, that can be a sign that you will likely be dissatisfied in this new job or if you are honest and open, giving them reasons why you left, may give them insight on how to keep you engaged and solid in this new position.
  4. What requirements will it take to fulfill this job, or even to get past the interview process against others that are equally (or even more) qualified for this position? Will others be more prepared and qualified for this position? What education do you need to have? What job training or experience do you need? Can you/should you get this training and education before applying for this type of job?
  5. Are you willing to go back to school to get this job? Is there on-the-job training? Or does the company want a “blank slate,” to train their own way and so doesn’t want you to be trained too much by someone else? You may be able to entice the interviewer that you are not trained or educated for this job but that you are a “blank slate,” ready to be trained their way. Remember that the employer is human, like you, but is looking for the best fit for this position, out of all the applicants. Are you the best person to fill this need?

Now, after doing your research into the new position, do not quit your day job. You want to make a smooth transition from your previous job into a new job. You also do not know if you will find a new job right away. You may start interviewing with these other positions while still working at your day job. This also shows the new employer that they are not hiring someone that was fired or had issues finding work. If they know they have someone that is already wanted by another employer, then you are playing on their jealousy that they want this employee just as much, if not more, and will pay to entice you to come over. So, do not enter an interview with a sense of desperation. When looking for a job, try taking these steps first:

  1. Look to see if there are jobs that will satisfy your needs and wants and see what they provide for salary and benefits. Do some research into the company culture and see if you are a good fit.
  2. Talk to the employees that would be working with you. There is nothing wrong with you entering the interview knowing anything and everything about the company and their employees. You could even go as far as to invite one of the employees to go out to lunch with you so you can “pick their brain” (ask them every question imaginable so you can determine if it is a good fit before you join). Remember also that just like you want to research the job opportunity, the employer wants you to know as much as possible beforehand. No employer wants you to join their ranks just to leave it after being trained.
  3. Find out what type of qualifications you will need to work there and take the time to take the classes and training necessary to obtain those qualifications. Remember that these classes won’t just help you in a future position but may help you in the position you are currently working. They could also line you up for a promotion in your current job, which may end up engaging you. Tell your current boss that you are taking new classes. Don’t tell them that you are looking into getting a new job. Employers love when their workers are getting more education because it will only help with their current position. They see this as an opportunity, and if they are wise, they will offer you a higher position or pay more to keep a well-educated employee working for them.
  4. Before going too far with searching out a new job, ask your employer what it would take to get a promotion or higher position in the company. If there is no upward momentum or path you can take, this is a good sign to find new employment. If there is upward momentum, this may be just what you need to satisfy your needs and get you reengaged. Even when you get a job offer, go back to your employer and tell them that you received a job offer but because you are loyal, you would like to stay here (if you do want to stay) if there is a way they can match the job offer or give you a promotion with something that will satisfy you.

Remember that anyone can ask for a promotion, but the ones to receive them are those willing to work for it. Are you willing to work for it? If so, ask your manager what you need to do to be promoted. Take their recommendations to heart. If you take those classes needed, show more initiative, or do what is required to advance, then you deserve that promotion. If they don’t give it to you at that point, then you have every right (and almost an obligation) to leave for a better job. If you are educated and ready for the position that you want, it is time to write a rock-solid resume. A resume is a summary of your work history, education, and even certifications, publications, and organizations you belong to. Here are a few tips when writing a resume:

Resume, in general:

  • Keep it all to one page. If it becomes too long, the reviewer will not read it.
  • You can use a template to get started, but remember to personalize it to speak more to who you are.
  • Resumes are often read by computers these days; templates can help get past the bots. Any system these days that takes resumes normally has a program to sort through viable resumes.
  • Keep it simple and uniform. Make sure it looks the same throughout, with font and spacing.
  • While simple, you want it to stand out. Make it unique, in your own way, but be careful about being too unique and giving too much information.
  • Make your contact information prominent and put it at the top, so they don’t need to search.
  • Design it to be skimmable, hitting all the highlights, without lengthy sentences.
  • Seek guidance from a professional - the money you may spend will be worth it.
  • Use active language, like “accomplished,” “achieved,” and “earned.”
  • Choose standard margins and spacing in the format, so it doesn’t look too busy.

Objective:

  • This is not needed unless you are making a large jump between different career fields; some employers do like it as a summary, but most know what type of job you are looking for, so it’s not needed.
  • If you are to write one, make sure that you focus it on each specific position.
  • Don’t use “I” or “me.” Make the objective very short - 2 lines - and straight to the point.

Job History:

  continue reading

57 에피소드

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