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Are you tired of hearing about coronavirus? Has lockdown left you worn out? Then perhaps it’s time to escape. Join Rowan Hooper and the team at New Scientist in this covid-free space, as they discuss all that’s right with the world - the stories that remind us of how wonderful this planet really is. Find out more at newscientist.com/podcasts
 
Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.
 
Join entrepreneur, technology investor, and self-experimenter Kevin Rose as he explores new ways to reach peak personal and professional performance. In this "podcast for the curious," Kevin interviews technologists, scientists, meditators, self-experimenters, and productivity hackers to discover insights that you can incorporate into daily life. Time Magazine calls him one of the "Top 25 Most Influential People on the Web," and Bloomberg lists him as a "Top 25 Angel Investor." Kevin has app ...
 
Brit Morin is curious about...just about everything! As the founder and CEO of Brit + Co, she is a pioneer in tech, a champion for creativity, and a role model for women across the country. And now she is taking her voracious appetite for learning and self-growth challenges to a whole new level. But how do you learn about EVERYTHING? You ask the world’s best experts to teach you – in less than an hour! In each episode, Brit sits down with inspirational figures like scientists, CEOs, influenc ...
 
The Live Long and Master Aging (LLAMA) podcast is a weekly series of extended, one-to-one interviews, about human longevity. Hosted by Peter Bowes, leading scientists share their latest research into living a long and healthy life. We delve into the clinical trials and challenge new ideas. We also feature some remarkable people who have already mastered the art of aging. Hear about their insights into growing old, without feeling old, and the secrets of their longevity.
 
Talk Python to Me is a weekly podcast hosted by developer and entrepreneur Michael Kennedy. We dive deep into the popular packages and software developers, data scientists, and incredible hobbyists doing amazing things with Python. If you're new to Python, you'll quickly learn the ins and outs of the community by hearing from the leaders. And if you've been Pythoning for years, you'll learn about your favorite packages and the hot new ones coming out of open source.
 
A hidden city called Leviathan lies deep within the dark trenches of the Pacific Ocean. The city is home to a community of immortals that sought to create a utopia over 1,000 years ago. For a millennia, they lived in peace and secrecy, gently influencing world events to aid the advancement of mankind. But a terrible secret has been kept deep within the catacombs of Leviathan that threatens the existence of the immortals, and quite possibly the entire world. One woman named Macallan Orsel, a ...
 
In the nineteen-sixties, a group of wealthy men concludes that it's already too late to stop global warming from destroying the planet. But they have a plan to save themselves. Twenty years later, Jack Crowley and Jim Patterson stumble onto the conspiracy, and every answer they find is accompanied by more questions - and more deaths. Jack is a former idealist, turned cynical by his years working as a New York tabloid editor. But his enthusiasm returns as he looks into the work of a NASA scie ...
 
INTERCAST SEASON ONE - weekly short storiesNEW WORLD ORDERS, A NOVEL - In the nineteen-sixties, a group of wealthy men concludes that it's already too late to stop global warming from destroying the planet. But they have a plan to save themselves.Twenty years later, Jack Crowley and Jim Patterson stumble onto the conspiracy, and every answer they find is accompanied by more questions - and more deaths. Jack is a former idealist, turned cynical by his years working as a New York tabloid edito ...
 
The New Screen Savers is a variety show for tech on the TWiT network. The show stars Leo Laporte and is co-hosted by Megan Morrone and Jason Howell. Viewers get live tech help, interesting guests, insights into the latest innovations, products, scientist, and trends, plus lots of fun things thrown in, too. There are special guest co-host appearances from Patrick Norton, Kate Botello, Kevin Rose, Martin Sargent, and more. Although the show is no longer in production, you can enjoy episodes fr ...
 
The New Screen Savers is a variety show for tech on the TWiT network. The show stars Leo Laporte and is co-hosted by Megan Morrone and Jason Howell. Viewers get live tech help, interesting guests, insights into the latest innovations, products, scientist, and trends, plus lots of fun things thrown in, too. There are special guest co-host appearances from Patrick Norton, Kate Botello, Kevin Rose, Martin Sargent, and more. Although the show is no longer in production, you can enjoy episodes fr ...
 
This podcast is for professionals in the conservation practitioners or citizen scientists. Trying to save the environment and its species can be challenging, frustrating, stressful and depressing-how do we cope with this? Join Dr. Scarlett Smash, an environmental science/marine conservation scientist and yogi practitioner on a journey of self-care. It is important to becoming a mindful conservationist, connecting conservation and holistic healing to provoke and awaken a wholeness in one’s se ...
 
The 6th World Conference of Science Journalists 2009 (WCSJ2009) brings established and aspiring reporters,writers and science communicators from around the world to debate, network, develop their professional skills and report thelatest advances in science and technology.
 
Supported by a Wellcome Trust Public Engagement grant (2006-2008) in the History of Medicine to Professor Tilli Tansey (QMUL) and Professor Leslie Iversen (Oxford), the History of Modern Biomedicine Research Group at Queen Mary, University of London presents a series of podcasts on the history of neuroscience featuring eminent people in the field: Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor ...
 
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show series
 
Making sense of the many weird and wonderful interactions that inform our view of the world, this episode is all about perception. The team opens with the incredible noise of a binaural sound, to illustrate the subtle complexity of the way we hear the world around us. They then put perception under the microscope, zooming in at a quantum scale wher…
 
Scientists tinkering around with the creation of synthetic life have taken a significant step forward. The team explains how synthetic cells could one day be implanted in humans. Alongside this is the news that researchers have used frog skin cells to create a microscopic living robot, which can heal and power itself. As levels of CO2 in the atmosp…
 
Listen to this interview of Christopher Thaiss, author of Writing Science in the Twenty-First Century (Broadview Press 2019). We talk about the research article, about writing styles, and about the uses of rhetoric to scientists. Interviewer: "Too many students learning to write in the sciences lack helpful feedback on their writing, and this cause…
 
Get money smart in this week's episode with famed credit card and loyalty points hacker, Brian Kelly. He founded The Points Guy a decade ago and ever since has been on a mission to find the best credit card and loyalty points deals to maximize our spending, up our credit scores, and travel the world for less. He's here to break down the most useful…
 
Often called “Europe’s last dictator”, Alexander Lukashenka has ruled Belarus – a land-locked European country of close to 10 million people bordered by Russia, Ukraine, Poland and two Baltic states - since 1994. For more than a quarter-century, his regime has consistently rigged votes but blatant election fraud in 2020 triggered rolling protests t…
 
When Trump became president, much of the country was repelled by what they saw as the vulgar spectacle of his ascent, a perversion of the highest office in the land. In his bold, innovative book, Political Perversion: Rhetorical Aberration in the Time of Trumpeteering (University of Chicago Press, 2020), rhetorician Joshua Gunn argues that this “me…
 
We're back after taking a week off and it was sweet episode (quite literally). Full episode breakdown: Food News Food Experiences Mystery Twizzlers Nestle Shark Wafer Cookies from China - Milk, Chocolate, and Peanut Butter Pink Creme filled Twinkies - Lemonade Stand vs Cotton Candy Email: foodscientistspodcast@gmail.com phone (text or call): 402-YU…
 
Human dignity is the key term that the Universal Declaration on Human Rights placed at the center of legal discourse on a global level. In 1949, Germany incorporated the concept of human dignity in its Basic law. Human Dignity in Context (Nomos/Hart, 2018), edited by Dieter Grimm, Alexandra Kemmerer, and Christoph Möllers, provides a contextual ana…
 
Technology is breaking politics - what can be done about it? Artificially intelligent "bot" accounts attack politicians and public figures on social media. Conspiracy theorists publish junk news sites to promote their outlandish beliefs. Campaigners create fake dating profiles to attract young voters. We live in a world of technologies that misdire…
 
These days Git is synonymous with source control itself. Rare are the current debates of whether to use git vs SVN vs some fossil like SourceSafe vs you name it. But do you know how Git works? What about it's internals? I'm sure you've seen a .git folder in your project's root. But to most folks, it's a black box. In this episode, you'll meet Rob R…
 
The field of US foreign-relations history is not what it used to be, and that’s a good thing. Earlier historians narrowly defined the field as diplomatic history­­ and kept vast swathes of the United States’ interactions with the world from being explored. In the middle of the 1990s, for example, even the very consideration of gender in the history…
 
The Community Relations Service (CRS) came into being alongside the Voting Rights Act—as part of the Act itself. And this organization was integrated into the Voting Rights Act in 1964 because President Lyndon Johnson wanted it to be included in that landmark legislation, in part because Johnson, as an adept politician and negotiator, saw the impor…
 
Living life to the full, at any age, has been a challenge recently. To put it mildly. But if Covid has taught us anything, it is that some of life's simplest pleasures are what make life itself worth living. Therein lies a metaphor for healthy aging. Physical fitness, social contact and an active mind go a long way towards helping us live longer an…
 
In this very special episode of New Books in Interpretive Political and Social Science we feature Lee Ann Fujii’s Interviewing in Social Science Research: A Relational Approach (Routledge, 2018), which is the fifth title in the Routledge Series on Interpretive Methods. Lee Ann Fujii was a professor at the University of Toronto who published widely …
 
Dina Hassan (Lecturer, Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, University of Oklahoma, USA) speaks with Nicola Pratt (Associate Professor, International Politics of the Middle East, University of Warwick, UK) about Pratt’s recent book, Embodying Geopolitics: Generations of Women’s Activism in Egypt, Jordan, and Lebanon (University of Califo…
 
“Economics is the long-run driver” in the history of Europe’s monetary union, writes Richard Pomfret in the first of a new Cambridge Elements series on the Economics of European Integration: The Road to Monetary Union (Cambridge University Press, 2021). “Politics often determined the timing of the next step ... but it has not determined the directi…
 
Today on the New Books in History, a channel on the New Books Network, we’re here today with Christopher Close, Associate Professor of History at St. Joseph’s University in the incomparable city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to talk about his latest book, State Formation and Shared Sovereignty: The Holy Roman Empire and the Dutch Republic, 1488- 1…
 
Bethenny Frankel is a selfmade serial entrepreneur, founder of the Skinnygirl brand and BStrong, and OG star of The Real Housewives of New York City. She joins Brit for a refreshingly candid convo about the best business decision she ever made, why she left The Real Housewives, and her advice for trusting your gut and feeling more confident so you …
 
In late 2017, scientists at a Hawaiian observatory glimpsed an object soaring through our inner solar system, moving so quickly that it could only have come from another star. Avi Loeb, an astronomer, showed it was not an asteroid; it was moving too fast along a strange orbit, and left no trail of gas or debris in its wake. There was only one conce…
 
For centuries, science has largely dismissed the idea that animals experience complex emotions, despite the fact the most humans who’ve spent time in the company of animals would argue otherwise. While research on animal subjectivity is expanding, we still know relatively little about the complexities of non-humans’ emotional lives. Teya Brooks Pri…
 
Celebrating the forgotten people behind history’s biggest scientific breakthroughs, this episode is an ode to unsung heroes. Starting with the American chemist Alice Ball, the team discusses her groundbreaking work on leprosy in the 20th century. They then remember the German mathematician Emmy Noether whose theorem is so impressive it puts Pythago…
 
The last several decades have seen tremendous political and cultural strides forward for the LGBTQ+ community with both the legislative and cultural recognition helping many secure a more safe and open lifestyle than possible just a short while ago. However, these advances have raised a number of criticisms and qualifications, and not just from stu…
 
Timothy Beatley is the Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities at the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia, where he has taught for over twenty-five years. His primary teaching and research interests are in environmental planning and policy, with a special emphasis on coastal and natural hazards planning, environmental val…
 
The Value of Science in Space Exploration (Oxford UP, 2020) provides a rigorous assessment of the value of scientific knowledge and understanding in the context of contemporary space exploration. It argues that traditional spaceflight rationales are deficient, and that the strongest defense of spaceflight comes from its potential to produce intrins…
 
Faced with a major terrorist threat, states seem to reach instinctively for the most coercive tools in their arsenal and, in doing so, risk exacerbating the situation. This policy response seems to be driven in equal parts by a lack of understanding of the true nature of the threat, an exaggerated faith in the use of force, and a lack of faith that…
 
In Training for Catastrophe: Fictions of National Security After 9/11 (University of Minnesota Press, 2021), author Lindsay Thomas studies the relationship between fiction and U.S. national security — specifically, the instrumentalization of fiction in preparedness materials, in which fictional events are phrased not only as real, but as producing …
 
The tables have turned and this time I'm the guest and you all are the hosts. I get a ton of questions over email and twitter asking me about my thoughts on various trends, tools, and behind the scenes questions around Talk Python. So I've enlisted two listeners who are up for hosting a conversation and taking questions from you all. Thank you to P…
 
From ecology to fermentation, in pop culture and in medicine—mushrooms are everywhere. With an explorer’s eye, author Doug Bierend guides readers through the weird, wonderful world of fungi and the amazing modern mycological movement. In Search of Mycotopia: Citizen Science, Fungi Fanatics, and the Untapped Potential of Mushrooms (Chelsea Green, 20…
 
Games have been of interest to mathematicians almost since mathematics became a subject. In fact, entire branches of mathematics have arisen simply to analyze certain games. The Raven's Hat: Fallen Pictures, Rising Sequences, and Other Mathematical Games (MIT Press, 2021) does something very different, and something that I think listeners will find…
 
Spring has sprung and… ACHOO!! Yep, hay fever is back with a vengeance. This week the team has some bad news for hay fever sufferers, as allergies are set to get worse (in every way imaginable) because of climate change. The team then ramps up the excitement with the news that there may be an ancient black hole sitting on the edge of our solar syst…
 
The Art of Political Control in China (Cambridge University Press, 2019) shows how China's authoritarian state ensures political control by non-violent mechanisms. Daniel C. Mattingly demonstrates how coercive control is achieved through informal means to achieve goals such as land redistribution, the enforcement of family planning policies, and th…
 
Political theorists Melvin Rogers and Jack “Chip” Turner have produced a truly magisterial edited volume centering the work by African American thinkers over the past centuries. With thirty contributed chapters, ranging across time, place, and person, this Collected History opens up the dialogue among theorists, writers, students, and scholars to e…
 
Evil is among our everyday moral concepts. It is common to hear politicians and others condemn certain acts, purposes, people, or even populations as evil. But what does it mean to say that something is evil? Is the evil simply the exceedingly wrong? Is evil rather a distinctive kind of wrongness? Is it a kind of wrongness at all? Are acts evil reg…
 
The Ogallala aquifer has nourished life on the American Great Plains for millennia. But less than a century of unsustainable irrigation farming has taxed much of the aquifer beyond repair. The imminent depletion of the Ogallala and other aquifers around the world is a defining planetary crisis of our times. Running Out: In Search of Water on the Hi…
 
Cracking the code behind aging has long since fascinated, frustrated and captivated scientists. In our quest to live longer and better, a desire to fully understand the mechanisms that explain how and why we grow old, has been central to longevity research. In recent years some significant progress has been made. A clearer picture is emerging of th…
 
Dr. Aditi Nerurkar is a Harvard-trained physician and public health expert with 20 years of experience exploring the link between stress and resilience. In this week's episode, she shares her proven tips for feeling less anxious, breaking our doom-scrolling habit, and adopting a more optimistic outlook on stress. She also gives us a three-word mant…
 
As the push for a Universal Healthcare system in the United States becomes more and more popular among the American people, we’re beginning to have more public conversations about access to and affordability of medical care. While many of us may not consider our health insurance until we need it, for those with chronic conditions, the American medi…
 
A compassionate and captivating examination of evolving attitudes toward mental illness throughout history and the fight to end the stigma. For centuries, scientists and society cast moral judgments on anyone deemed mentally ill, confining many to asylums. In Nobody's Normal: How Culture Created the Stigma of Mental Illness (W. W. Norton & Company,…
 
From music to nature to infinity, this episode is all about scales. The team opens with a keyboard ditty as they explore the science behind musical scales - and why major chords sound happy, while minor chords sound sad. They then find themselves tangled up in spider webs, finding out how various structures at different scales club together to give…
 
We have a couple of "live" experiences this week, one even involving Peeps! Full Episode Breakdown: Food News Food Experiences - Baked Peeps Krispies, Like Air Baked Puffcorn Hershey's Kisses - Strawberry Ice Cream Cone Lays Yam and Taro Chips - Cucumber Yam Chips, Lays Tomato Yam Chips, Lime Taro Chips Little Debbie Swill Rolls vs Hostess Ho-Hos E…
 
How do we make sense of the “durability and gigantic scale” of China’s economic expansion alongside the reports of “rising” and “explosive” corruption? How has China moved from an “impoverished communist regime to a capitalist superpower rivaling the United States” despite a crisis of corruption that its own leadership describes as “gave” and “shoc…
 
Rebecca Bryant, Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Utrecht University, and Mete Hatay, the Senior Research Consultant at the Peace Research Institute Oslo, co-authored Sovereignty Suspended: Building the So-Called State (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020). The monograph is based on more than two decades of ethnographic and archival research…
 
Machine learning and data science are full of best practices and important workflows. Can we extrapolate these to our broader lives? Eugene Yan and I give it a shot on this slightly more philosophical episode of Talk Python To Me. The seven lessons: 1. Data cleaning: Assess what you consume 2. Low vs. high signal data: Seek to disconfirm and update…
 
The Large Hadron Collider might, just might, have found something that challenges the Standard Model of particle physics. The team hears why an anomaly concerning a quark could hint at a crack in our understanding of physics. They also find out whether the age-defying, rejuvenating properties of human embryos can help us reset the ageing process in…
 
In 2015, the Islamic State released a video of men smashing sculptures in Iraq’s Mosul Museum as part of a mission to cleanse the world of idolatry. The Idols of ISIS: From Assyria to the Internet (University of Chicago Press, 2020) unpacks three key facets of that event: the status and power of images, the political importance of museums, and the …
 
Carolyn Holmes’ new book, The Black and White Rainbow: Reconciliation, Opposition, and Nation-building in Democratic South Africa (U Michigan Press, 2020),takes its title from a cartoon that captured the complicated nature of democratization and nation-building in South Africa in the period that followed the end of apartheid. As Holmes explains in …
 
Baby boomers make up a significant portion of the world's population. In the US and the UK the generation born between 1946 and 1964 represents about a fifth of all people and is a hugely influential group. So what's it like to be a boomer in 2021? Many are still working, physically active and important contributors to the economy. Others are retir…
 
Robbie Shilliam’s new book for the Polity Press’s “Decolonizing the Curriculum” series explores how the discipline of political science was born of colonialism, and takes us through different ways of reimagining our study of politics. In this conversation, Robbie talks to host Yi Ning Chang not just about reconceptualizing the various subfields, bu…
 
There are currently eleven million Uyghurs living in China, but more than one million are being held in so-called reeducation camps. A cultural genocide is taking place under the guise of counterterrorism. In this profound and explosive book, Sean Roberts shows how China is using the US-led global war on terror to erase and replace Uyghur culture a…
 
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