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ALGERNON.What you really are is a Bunburyist. I was quite right in saying you were a Bunburyist. You are one of the most advanced Bunburyists I know.JACK.What on earth do you mean?ALGERNON.You have invented a very useful younger brother called Ernest, in order that you may be able to come up to town as often as you like. I have invented an invaluab…
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JACK.My dear Algy, I don’t know whether you will be able to understand my real motives. You are hardly serious enough. When one is placed in the position of guardian, one has to adopt a very high moral tone on all subjects. It’s one’s duty to do so. And as a high moral tone can hardly be said to conduce very much to either one’s health or one’s hap…
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JACK.Bunburyist? What on earth do you mean by a Bunburyist?ALGERNON.I’ll reveal to you the meaning of that incomparable expression as soon as you are kind enough to inform me why you are Ernest in town and Jack in the country.JACK.Well, produce my cigarette case first.ALGERNON.Here it is. [Hands cigarette case.] Now produce your explanation, and pr…
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JACK.Well, my name is Ernest in town and Jack in the country, and the cigarette case was given to me in the country.ALGERNON.Yes, but that does not account for the fact that your small Aunt Cecily, who lives at Tunbridge Wells, calls you her dear uncle. Come, old boy, you had much better have the thing out at once.JACK.My dear Algy, you talk exactl…
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ALGERNON.You have always told me it was Ernest. I have introduced you to every one as Ernest. You answer to the name of Ernest. You look as if your name was Ernest. You are the most earnest-looking person I ever saw in my life. It is perfectly absurd your saying that your name isn’t Ernest. It’s on your cards. Here is one of them. [Taking it from c…
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JACK.[Moving to sofa and kneeling upon it.] My dear fellow, what on earth is there in that? Some aunts are tall, some aunts are not tall. That is a matter that surely an aunt may be allowed to decide for herself. You seem to think that every aunt should be exactly like your aunt! That is absurd! For Heaven’s sake give me back my cigarette case. [Fo…
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ALGERNON.Yes; but this isn’t your cigarette case. This cigarette case is a present from some one of the name of Cecily, and you said you didn’t know any one of that name.JACK.Well, if you want to know, Cecily happens to be my aunt.ALGERNON.Your aunt!JACK.Yes. Charming old lady she is, too. Lives at Tunbridge Wells. Just give it back to me, Algy.ALG…
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ALGERNON.I think that is rather mean of you, Ernest, I must say. [Opens case and examines it.] However, it makes no matter, for, now that I look at the inscription inside, I find that the thing isn’t yours after all.JACK.Of course it’s mine. [Moving to him.] You have seen me with it a hundred times, and you have no right whatsoever to read what is …
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JACK.Cecily! What on earth do you mean? What do you mean, Algy, by Cecily! I don’t know any one of the name of Cecily.[Enter Lane.]ALGERNON.Bring me that cigarette case Mr. Worthing left in the smoking-room the last time he dined here.LANE.Yes, sir. [Lane goes out.]JACK.Do you mean to say you have had my cigarette case all this time? I wish to good…
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JACK.Why on earth do you say that?ALGERNON.Well, in the first place girls never marry the men they flirt with. Girls don’t think it right.JACK.Oh, that is nonsense!ALGERNON.It isn’t. It is a great truth. It accounts for the extraordinary number of bachelors that one sees all over the place. In the second place, I don’t give my consent.JACK.Your con…
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[Jack puts out his hand to take a sandwich. Algernon at once interferes.] Please don’t touch the cucumber sandwiches. They are ordered specially for Aunt Augusta. [Takes one and eats it.]JACK.Well, you have been eating them all the time.ALGERNON.That is quite a different matter. She is my aunt. [Takes plate from below.] Have some bread and butter. …
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JACK.I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.ALGERNON.I thought you had come up for pleasure? . . . I call that business.JACK.How utterly unromantic you are!ALGERNON.I really don’t see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. W…
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ALGERNON.How immensely you must amuse them! [Goes over and takes sandwich.] By the way, Shropshire is your county, is it not?JACK.Eh? Shropshire? Yes, of course. Hallo! Why all these cups? Why cucumber sandwiches? Why such reckless extravagance in one so young? Who is coming to tea?ALGERNON.Oh! merely Aunt Augusta and Gwendolen.JACK.How perfectly d…
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LANE.Mr. Ernest Worthing.[Enter Jack.][Lane goes out_._]ALGERNON.How are you, my dear Ernest? What brings you up to town?JACK.Oh, pleasure, pleasure! What else should bring one anywhere? Eating as usual, I see, Algy!ALGERNON.I believe it is customary in good society to take some slight refreshment at five o’clock. Where have you been since last Thu…
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The Importance of Being EarnestA Trivial Comedy for Serious PeopleOscar WildeMorning-room in Algernon’s flat in Half-Moon Street. The room is luxuriously and artistically furnished. The sound of a piano is heard in the adjoining room.[Lane is arranging afternoon tea on the table, and after the music has ceased, Algernon enters.]ALGERNON.Did you hea…
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The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde(A Trivial Comedy for Serious People)오스카 와일드 「진지함의 중요성」(진지한 사람들을 위한 사소한 코미디)이미지: 1895년 런던 초연 당시 무대 위의 앨런 에인즈워스(Allan Aynesworth), 이블린 밀라드(Evelyn Millard), 아이린 반브루흐(Irene Vanbrugh), 조지 알렉산더(George Alexander).
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1장 (...) Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour,reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years hadbeen insufficient to make his wife understand his character. _Her_ mindwas less difficult to develope. She was a woman of mean understanding,little information, and uncertain temper. When she was disconten…
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Group Readinghttps://librivox.org/pride-and-prejudice-by-jane-austen-3/Mrs. Bennet: Beth ThomasMr. Bennet: Andy MinterNarrator: Debra Lynn---“But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes intothe neighbourhood.”“It is more than I engage for, I assure you.”“But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it wouldbe…
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Read by Elizabeth Kletthttps://librivox.org/pride-and-prejudice-solo-version-3-by-jane-austen/---“But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes intothe neighbourhood.”“It is more than I engage for, I assure you.”“But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it wouldbe for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas…
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“But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes intothe neighbourhood.”“It is more than I engage for, I assure you.”“But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it wouldbe for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go,merely on that account; for in general, you know, they visit no newcomers. …
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Group Readinghttps://librivox.org/pride-and-prejudice-by-jane-austen-3/Mrs. Bennet: Beth ThomasMr. Bennet: Andy MinterNarrator: Debra Lynn---It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possessionof a good fortune must be in want of a wife.However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on hisfirst entering a neighbo…
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Read by Elizabeth Kletthttps://librivox.org/pride-and-prejudice-solo-version-3-by-jane-austen/---It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possessionof a good fortune must be in want of a wife.However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on hisfirst entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the m…
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It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possessionof a good fortune must be in want of a wife.However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on hisfirst entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the mindsof the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightfulproperty of some one or oth…
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The long grass rustled at her feet as the White Rabbit hurried by—the frightened Mouse splashed his way through the neighbouring pool—she could hear the rattle of the teacups as the March Hare and his friends shared their never-ending meal, and the shrill voice of the Queen ordering off her unfortunate guests to execution—once more the pig-baby was…
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“Oh, I’ve had such a curious dream!” said Alice, and she told her sister, as well as she could remember them, all these strange Adventures of hers that you have just been reading about; and when she had finished, her sister kissed her, and said, “It was a curious dream, dear, certainly: but now run in to your tea; it’s getting late.” So Alice got u…
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“Who cares for you?” said Alice, (she had grown to her full size by this time.) “You’re nothing but a pack of cards!”At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came flying down upon her: she gave a little scream, half of fright and half of anger, and tried to beat them off, and found herself lying on the bank, with her head in the lap of her …
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“That’s the most important piece of evidence we’ve heard yet,” said the King, rubbing his hands; “so now let the jury—”“If any one of them can explain it,” said Alice, (she had grown so large in the last few minutes that she wasn’t a bit afraid of interrupting him,) “I’ll give him sixpence. I don’t believe there’s an atom of meaning in it.”The jury…
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“That proves his guilt,” said the Queen.“It proves nothing of the sort!” said Alice. “Why, you don’t even know what they’re about!”“Read them,” said the King.The White Rabbit put on his spectacles. “Where shall I begin, please your Majesty?” he asked.“Begin at the beginning,” the King said gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”--…
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“Are they in the prisoner’s handwriting?” asked another of the jurymen.“No, they’re not,” said the White Rabbit, “and that’s the queerest thing about it.” (The jury all looked puzzled.)“He must have imitated somebody else’s hand,” said the King. (The jury all brightened up again.)“Please your Majesty,” said the Knave, “I didn’t write it, and they c…
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“There’s more evidence to come yet, please your Majesty,” said the White Rabbit, jumping up in a great hurry; “this paper has just been picked up.”“What’s in it?” said the Queen.“I haven’t opened it yet,” said the White Rabbit, “but it seems to be a letter, written by the prisoner to—to somebody.”“It must have been that,” said the King, “unless it …
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“Rule Forty-two. All persons more than a mile high to leave the court.”Everybody looked at Alice.“I’m not a mile high,” said Alice.“You are,” said the King.“Nearly two miles high,” added the Queen.“Well, I shan’t go, at any rate,” said Alice: “besides, that’s not a regular rule: you invented it just now.”“It’s the oldest rule in the book,” said the…
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“What do you know about this business?” the King said to Alice.“Nothing,” said Alice.“Nothing whatever?” persisted the King.“Nothing whatever,” said Alice.“That’s very important,” the King said, turning to the jury. They were just beginning to write this down on their slates, when the White Rabbit interrupted: “Unimportant, your Majesty means, of c…
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“The trial cannot proceed,” said the King in a very grave voice, “until all the jurymen are back in their proper places—all,” he repeated with great emphasis, looking hard at Alice as he said so.Alice looked at the jury-box, and saw that, in her haste, she had put the Lizard in head downwards, and the poor little thing was waving its tail about in …
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“Here!” cried Alice, quite forgetting in the flurry of the moment how large she had grown in the last few minutes, and she jumped up in such a hurry that she tipped over the jury-box with the edge of her skirt, upsetting all the jurymen on to the heads of the crowd below, and there they lay sprawling about, reminding her very much of a globe of gol…
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“Never mind!” said the King, with an air of great relief. “Call the next witness.” And he added in an undertone to the Queen, “Really, my dear, you must cross-examine the next witness. It quite makes my forehead ache!”Alice watched the White Rabbit as he fumbled over the list, feeling very curious to see what the next witness would be like, “—for t…
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“Call the next witness!” said the King.The next witness was the Duchess’s cook. She carried the pepper-box in her hand, and Alice guessed who it was, even before she got into the court, by the way the people near the door began sneezing all at once.“Give your evidence,” said the King.“Shan’t,” said the cook.The King looked anxiously at the White Ra…
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“Take off your hat,” the King said to the Hatter.“It isn’t mine,” said the Hatter.“Stolen!” the King exclaimed, turning to the jury, who instantly made a memorandum of the fact.“I keep them to sell,” the Hatter added as an explanation; “I’ve none of my own. I’m a hatter.”Here the Queen put on her spectacles, and began staring at the Hatter, who tur…
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“The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, All on a summer day:The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, And took them quite away!”“Consider your verdict,” the King said to the jury.“Not yet, not yet!” the Rabbit hastily interrupted. “There’s a great deal to come before that!”“Call the first witness,” said the King; and the White Rabbit blew three…
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The twelve jurors were all writing very busily on slates. “What are they doing?” Alice whispered to the Gryphon. “They can’t have anything to put down yet, before the trial’s begun.”“They’re putting down their names,” the Gryphon whispered in reply, “for fear they should forget them before the end of the trial.”“Stupid things!” Alice began in a lou…
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“What is the use of repeating all that stuff,” the Mock Turtle interrupted, “if you don’t explain it as you go on? It’s by far the most confusing thing I ever heard!”“Yes, I think you’d better leave off,” said the Gryphon: and Alice was only too glad to do so.“Shall we try another figure of the Lobster Quadrille?” the Gryphon went on. “Or would you…
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“That’s different from what I used to say when I was a child,” said the Gryphon.“Well, I never heard it before,” said the Mock Turtle; “but it sounds uncommon nonsense.”Alice said nothing; she had sat down with her face in her hands, wondering if anything would ever happen in a natural way again.“I should like to have it explained,” said the Mock T…
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“The reason is,” said the Gryphon, “that they would go with the lobsters to the dance. So they got thrown out to sea. So they had to fall a long way. So they got their tails fast in their mouths. So they couldn’t get them out again. That’s all.”“Thank you,” said Alice, “it’s very interesting. I never knew so much about a whiting before.”“I can tell…
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“It must be a very pretty dance,” said Alice timidly.“Would you like to see a little of it?” said the Mock Turtle.“Very much indeed,” said Alice.“Come, let’s try the first figure!” said the Mock Turtle to the Gryphon. “We can do without lobsters, you know. Which shall sing?”“Oh, you sing,” said the Gryphon. “I’ve forgotten the words.”---생략된 이야기: 모조…
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“What sort of a dance is it?”“Why,” said the Gryphon, “you first form into a line along the sea-shore—”“Two lines!” cried the Mock Turtle. “Seals, turtles, salmon, and so on; then, when you’ve cleared all the jelly-fish out of the way—”“That generally takes some time,” interrupted the Gryphon.“—you advance twice—”“Each with a lobster as a partner!”…
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This was quite a new idea to Alice, and she thought it over a little before she made her next remark. “Then the eleventh day must have been a holiday?”“Of course it was,” said the Mock Turtle.“And how did you manage on the twelfth?” Alice went on eagerly.“That’s enough about lessons,” the Gryphon interrupted in a very decided tone: “tell her someth…
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“And how many hours a day did you do lessons?” said Alice, in a hurry to change the subject.“Ten hours the first day,” said the Mock Turtle: “nine the next, and so on.”“What a curious plan!” exclaimed Alice.“That’s the reason they’re called lessons,” the Gryphon remarked: “because they lessen from day to day.”---생략된 이야기: 모조 거북과 그리폰은 학교에서 배운 이상한 과목 …
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“I only took the regular course.”“What was that?” inquired Alice.“Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with,” the Mock Turtle replied; “and then the different branches of Arithmetic—Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision.”“I never heard of ‘Uglification,’” Alice ventured to say. “What is it?”The Gryphon lifted up both its paws in su…
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