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Home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare materials. Advancing knowledge and the arts. Discover it all at www.folger.edu. Shakespeare turns up in the most interesting places—not just literature and the stage, but science and social history as well. Our "Shakespeare Unlimited" podcast explores the fascinating and varied connections between Shakespeare, his works, and the world around us.
 
Merced Shakespearefest is dedicated to creating and performing high quality productions of Shakespeare plays that reflect and embrace the diversity of our community. We are a safe haven and artistic outlet for all people with a desire to express themselves through the works of history’s greatest playwright, and for all who wish to enjoy the results of our efforts.
 
“One of the Top 10 Podcasts for Theatre Fans!” (Broadway World) Since 2006, this “bright, breezy, & entertaining” (The Telegraph) podcast demystifies the creative process in chats with some of the sharpest and funniest artists in the business: ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic! Brian Dennehy! Playwright Lauren Gunderson! Director Mary Zimmerman! Novelist Christopher Moore! Comedian Rachel Parris! Shakespearean Sir Stanley Wells! And so many less! HEAR HERE!
 
From the earliest drama in English, to the closing of the theatres in 1642, there was a hell of a lot of drama produced - and a lot of it wasn't by Shakespeare. Apart from a few noble exceptions these plays are often passed over, ignored or simply unknown. This podcast presents full audio productions of the plays, fragmentary and extant, that shaped the theatrical world that shaped our dramatic history.
 
The social issues of Shakespeare's day which are featured in his plays (class division, racism, sexuality, intolerance, etc...) are still the burning issues in today's dysfunctional global society. This new and exciting podcast series will explore these social issues, connecting them straight from the page to our modern world. Each episode features panelists from all over the country sharing their expertise as we explore our humanity using Shakespeare as a cornerstone.
 
Was the name signed to the world's most famous plays and poems a pseudonym? Was the man from Stratford that history attributed the work to even capable of writing them? Who was Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, and is there any chance he was the actual author of those legendary works? Who WAS the writer behind the pen name "William Shakespeare?" Join Steven Sabel of the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship as he and his fellow Oxfordians set out to answer all of those questions and many more on ...
 
Theatre professionals, artists, vloggers and other guests from around the world join resident Shakespeare Birthplace Trust experts Paul and Anjna to discuss Shakespeare's place in the 21st century. We hear about their relationships with Shakespeare in the modern world and take a fresh look at Shakespeare in today's society.
 
Better than Shakespeare is a podcast dedicated to socialist theatre. Each week we discuss a different play relevant to socialist struggle in its aesthetic, historical, and theoretical context. There are also jokes. The core team is Andy Boyd and Danny Erickson, but we also have a rotating roster of stellar guests from the worlds of theatre and socialism and socialist theatre.
 
The high-art low-brow minds behind Bloomsday Literary bring you interviews with the creatives you should know, but don’t. Poets, novelists, memoirists, & short story writers join co-hosts Kate and Jessica as they take a respectful approach to investigating the writer’s art and an irreverent approach to getting the nitty-gritty on the hustle for publication and exposure. Most of us writers making a living by the pen occupy somewhere between the ubiquitous bestsellers and the people who want t ...
 
Offering knowledge and tools for appreciating Shakespeare's deep and universal meanings. Series I Short sessions on background information (numbered); Series 2 longer sessions on individual plays and sonnets (lettered). Series I Chapter 1: What's So Great about Shakespeare? (3 sessions) Chapter 2: Shakespeare the Man Chapter 3: Shakespeare's Theater Chapter 4: Shakespeare's Language (4 sessions) Chapter 5: Shakespeare's Characters Chapter 6: Unity in Variety (3 sessions) Chapter 7: Shakespea ...
 
LibriVox readers present the second collection of monologues from Shakespeare’s plays. Containing 15 parts. William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564 – April 23, 1616) remains widely to be considered the single greatest playwright of all time. He wrote in such a variety of genres - tragedy, comedy, romance, &c - that there is always at least one monologue in each of his plays. Some of these teach a lesson, some simply characterize Shakespeare at his best, some are funny, some sad, but all are very ...
 
LibriVox readers present the fourth collection of monologues from Shakespeare’s plays. Containing 20 parts. William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564 – April 23, 1616) remains widely to be considered the single greatest playwright of all time. He wrote in such a variety of genres - tragedy, comedy, romance, &c - that there is always at least one monologue in each of his plays. Some of these teach a lesson, some simply characterize Shakespeare at his best, some are funny, some sad, but all are very ...
 
Edith Nesbit, the author of Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare, felt passionately that young children should enjoy Shakespeare's great works. She set about to retell his plays in a language that children would not only understand, but delight in. This is a marvelous introduction to the works of Shakespeare that ALL will enjoy. (Summary by Laura)
 
LibriVox readers present the fifth collection of monologues from Shakespeare’s plays. Containing 20 parts. William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564 – April 23, 1616) remains widely to be considered the single greatest playwright of all time. He wrote in such a variety of genres - tragedy, comedy, romance, &c - that there is always at least one monologue in each of his plays. Some of these teach a lesson, some simply characterize Shakespeare at his best, some are funny, some sad, but all are very ...
 
LibriVox readers present the third collection of monologues from Shakespeare's plays. Containing 20 parts. - William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564 – April 23, 1616) remains widely to be considered the single greatest playwright of all time. He wrote in such a variety of genres - tragedy, comedy, romance, &c - that there is always at least one monologue in each of his plays. Some of these teach a lesson, some simply characterize Shakespeare at his best, some are funny, some sad, but all are ver ...
 
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show series
 
Many famous people from history have had their lives come to an end by execution. We tell these stories with gusto, reverence, and sometimes even humor, but the person responsible for being the executioner goes largely unnoticed beyond the recognition that someone, albeit we rarely know who, had to actually be the executioner. The word “executioner…
 
From you have I been absent in the spring, When proud pied April (dress'd in all his trim) Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing, That heavy Saturn laugh'd and leapt with him. Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odor and in hue, Could make me any summer's story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where th…
 
Series I, Chapter 7: Why All the Footnotes? Shakespeare's Mental Furniture Session 2: The Human Order: Monarchy vs. Democracy The Two Bodies of the King The Family The Individual Soul and Body The Humors The Five Wits Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.com저자 Doctor Rap
 
When we think of the time that Shakespeare was writing his most famous plays, what do we think of? A time when the world was very different- so different that women were sold into marriage by their fathers, prohibited from entering most professions, denied the right to vote, even barred from writing literature or performing on a public stage. In th…
 
Suzy Nakamura, a familiar face from The West Wing, Dr. Ken, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Modern Family, Veep, and over a hundred film and TV credits, is in London shooting the second season of Avenue 5, Armando Iannucci’s comedy starring Hugh Laurie (left) about an interstellar cruise ship that gets knocked off course and struggles to return to Earth. Suz…
 
On this episode of Better than Shakespeare, Andy and Danny talk about Andy's play The Trade Federation, out now from NoPassport Press!https://www.lulu.com/de/de/shop/andy-boyd/the-trade-federation-or-lets-explore-globalization-through-the-star-wars-prequels/paperback/product-8wr68g.htmlYou can attend the Book Launch Party on Zoom on Thursday Januar…
 
"Have at thee, coward!!!" As we've discussed before, there are SOOOOO many instances of violence of one kind or another in the Shakespeare canon. So... how does that get translated onto the stage or in a film in a believable way? We talk to Randy Kovitz, master fight choreographer, who helps us understand how we can stab, strangle, smother, or othe…
 
In this episode, host Steven Sabel takes a suggestion from a listener and uses it to tackle the troublesome, so-called "problem" plays of the Bard's canon. Support the show by picking up official Don't Quill the Messenger merchandise at www.dontquillthepodcast.com Presented by the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship. Learn more at www.shakespeareoxfordfe…
 
Does Hamlet live in a Ptolemaic or Copernican solar system? Is Queen Mab a germ? Which falls faster: a feather or the Duke of Gloucester? In Shakespeare’s time, new scientific discoveries and mathematical concepts were upending the way people looked at their world. Many of those new ideas found their ways into his plays. We speak with Dr. Natalie E…
 
Hello, welcome to a New Year, just a little thank you to all our listeners and viewers for all your support. Have a very Happy New Year, from Robert Crighton. The Beyond Shakespeare Podcast is supported by its patrons – become a patron and you get to choose the plays we work on next. Go to www.patreon.com/beyondshakespeare - or if you'd like to buy…
 
Nathan and Simon Dowling are the faces and masterminds of the YouTube channel, The Break A Leggers. In the final episode of this series Anjna talks to them about their experiences of reviewing theatre and their expectations of watching Shakespeare live in the modern world. Support the show (https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/podcast-support)…
 
What do you get when you cross clever, sometimes soaring, sometimes heart-breaking, always beautiful prose with immortality, fantasy, and historical themes? Signature Joy Preble. Since 2009, when she published the first book in her Dreaming Anastasia series, she has been writing YA novels that will break your heart, restore your hope in the good th…
 
Series I, Chapter 7: Why All the Footnotes? Shakespeare's Mental Furniture, Session 1: Words We Know Words We Don't Know Shakespeare and Electricity The Medieval Synthesis The Cosmic Hierarchy Notes: The reference to Lewis is to C.S. Lewis, The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University …
 
Using Shakespeare’s ‘The Merchant of Venice” as a foundation for discussion, this episode studies the historical moment in which Shakespeare was writing about Venetian religious and cultural composition, how Shakespeare grapples with religious and cultural identity and how the text of this controversial play written in 1596 can teach us about empat…
 
When Shakespeare was 39 years old, in 1603, King James of Scotland succeeded Queen Elizabeth after her death, and he brought with him a famous repugnancy, and some call it outright fear, of witches during his reign. In Scotland, where James was dually King at this time, witchcraft had been considered a capital offense since 1563. The King brought t…
 
How like a winter hath my absence been From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year! What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen! What old December's bareness every where! And yet this time remov'd was summer's time, The teeming autumn, big with rich increase, Bearing the wanton burden of the prime, Like widowed wombs after their lords' decease…
 
Series II, Podcast D: As You Like It New prelude/postlude: Chopin, Piano Concerto No. 1, Op. 11, Third Movement, quartet version, in the public domain. Upcoming, Why All the Footnotes: Shakespeare's Mental Furniture with a better mic. Thanks for technical and other help to N. A., A. G., J. G., F. H., and A. R. Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.co…
 
Series I, Chapter 6: Unity in Variety, Session 3: Setting, Theme, Audience The third session in the chapter on Unity in Variety looks at settings, themes, and then brings in the audience as contributor to the unity of a play. Coming next, As You Like It, with a format upgrade: Prelude and postlude. Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.com.…
 
Dr. Jeffrey R. Wilson, author of Shakespeare and Trump, now has a much more fun book to talk about, Shakespeare and Game of Thrones! Joining us in the discussion are Dr. Kavita Mudan Finn, a professor and scholar of medieval and early modern literature, and Senior Editor at The Public Medievalist; and Dr. Shiloh Carroll, whose book Medievalism in A…
 
Famously, the grave of William Shakespeare is marked with an ominous entreaty carved on his stone that warns against disturbing his bones, declaring a curse on anyone that disturbs the dust enclosed here. Respecting Shakespeare’s wishes has meant that it was impossible to excavate the grave of the bard and explore questions like how he was buried, …
 
Andy and Danny discuss the anti-feudal farce The Marriage of Figaro by Pierre Beaumarchais.We read this translation:https://oll.libertyfund.org/title/holcroft-the-marriage-of-figaro-or-the-follies-of-a-day#previewHere is a clip from Danny's favorite staging of the opera:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAYqk7jppL4…
 
For this last podcast of 2020 (and thank goodness this annus horribilus is over!), we present highlights from our favorite episodes from over 14 years of regular weekly podcasting! Featuring solid categorization; excessive candidates; important work; stories of process; helpful tips; new partners and old friends; and ultimately, passionate chats ab…
 
Series I, Chapter 6: Why the play's the thing: Unity in Variety, Session 1 Unity and meaning Shakespeare and the hologram All roads lead to meaning Words Images In the next session we'll look at figures of speech, action, scene, character, and plot. In the third session, we'll look at setting and theme and then at the audience.…
 
For centuries, theater historians have glossed over noy only the location, but actually argued over the very existence of a theater at Newington Butts. Originally established as an archery range under Henry VIII during a time when learning the sport of archery was required for all young men, the high ground at Newington Butts just outside of London…
 
Merrie Christmas, dear listeners!!! In this episode we discuss how those Elizabethans celebrated Christmas - for twelve days, those filthy animals!!! ALSO..... At the end of the episode is a special gift from us to you... Merry Merry!!!! So now is come our joyful'st feast, Let every man be jolly. Each room with ivy leaves is drest, And every post w…
 
Series II, Podcast D: Much Ado about Nothing Discussion, three key lines, and, at the end, a series of particular notes to help you in your reading of the play. For those you may want to be sitting with your text and a pencil. Questions? email DoctorRap@zohomail.com.저자 Doctor Rap
 
Steven welcomes Hank Whittemore back to the show for the second of back-to-back episodes exploring further entries in Whittemore's book, "100 Reasons Shake-Speare Was The Earl of Oxford." In this episode they discuss reasons #53, #61, #69, #85, and #99, touching on topics such as Oxford and Southampton, astronomy, royal suitors, truth, and daughter…
 
Exploring: The N-Town Play, a slow burn look at a medieval Mystery (sort of) cycle. The N-Town Play comes to us as a single manuscript, but it's a compilation of various different sources - including elements from what looks like a cycle and various other large scale productions focusing on episodes from the Bible. The journey continues with plays …
 
In our final episode of the year, some of the wonderful Such Stuff team offer up festive readings, poems and stories that bring joy and contemplation at this time of year. We’re calling it out very own Such Stuff Christmas Cracker Bonanza; pull the cracker, and who knows what you’ll find inside? We hear from actor Paul Ready, lecturer and research …
 
Inspired by the Berko Speakeasy, this week we present a festive tale by Canadian novelist Robertson Davies, from his slim volume High Spirits: A Collection of Ghost Stories. Abridged and read by Austin Tichenor. Featuring: ghostly visitations; poor relations; spectral elitism; Norwegian sneering; drafty accommodations; phantom arthritis; and someth…
 
William Shakespeare’s father was a man named John Shakespeare. When you study William’s life you often hear about John Shakespeare, as many references to glove making in Shakespeare’s plays like the glover’s pairing knife in Merry Wives of Windsor come from an intimate knowledge with the glove making trade, which most assume came from William’s fat…
 
Some say thy fault is youth, some wantonness, Some say thy grace is youth and gentle sport; Both grace and faults are lov'd of more and less: Thou mak'st faults graces that to thee resort. As on the finger of a throned queen The basest jewel will be well esteem'd, So are those errors that in thee are seen To truths translated, and for true things d…
 
Exploring: The N-Town Play, a slow burn look at a medieval Mystery (sort of) cycle. The N-Town Play comes to us as a single manuscript, but it's a compilation of various different sources - including elements from what looks like a cycle and various other large scale productions focusing on episodes from the Bible. The journey continues with plays …
 
Als Kulturredakteur beim Darmstädter Echo ist Stefan Benz mit der Theaterwelt bestens vertraut. Mit ihm spricht Anne Brückner über seine Krimi-Trilogie um einen Theaterkritiker, der große Dramen unkonventionell erklärt und dabei Verbrechen in der Kulturszene aufklärt.저자 Radio Darmstadt
 
Passend zur Jahreszeit geht es im Dezember um das Weihnachtsmärchen im Staatstheater. Der Dramaturg Maximilian Löwenstein verrät im Gespräch mit Michael Ihringer, wo die Herausforderungen bei dieser reinen Online-Produktion lagen, und wie das Publikum darauf reagiert hat.저자 Radio Darmstadt
 
In our second advent episode, we turn to a snowy story from the history of the Globe theatre, our very own Christmas miracle. In the icy winter of 1598, a theatre was dismantled on the north side of the river, the timbers rolled through the snowy streets of London, and the Globe theatre was born on the south side of the river. But what really happe…
 
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