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Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here: theguardian.com/covid19questions
 
Exploring the coolest and most incredible stuff in science, from way back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth to a future where humans live in space! Fun Kids Science Weekly is hosted by Dan and is the perfect science podcast for kids and families everywhere. Each week, you'll find episodes from series like Deep Space High, Age of the Dinosaurs and Professor Hallux. There's also a special guest, top experts answering all your science questions and Dangerous Dan - something scientific that’s also ...
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine. His column, "Antigravity," is one of science writing's great humor venues. Also check our daily podcast from Scientific American : "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived ...
 
Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.
 
Quirky, entertaining and informative, the weekly Science Update Podcast bundles five of Science Update’s award-winning 60-second radio shows together with insightful commentary from one of our producers. Since 1988, Science Update has covered the latest discoveries in science, technology, and medicine and has answered listeners’ science questions. Phone your question in to our toll-free answer line, 1-800-WHY-ISIT (949-4748) or submit it via our website, scienceupdate.com. Science Update is ...
 
This weekly podcast dives into the agbiosciences sector in Indiana, where 21st Century agriculture, life sciences innovation and cutting-edge technology converge. Ag+Bio+Science is an in-depth conversation with leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs in the space. Learn more about the pioneering industry and where it's heading from those leading the way.
 
Urban Nerd Weekly is a podcast dedicated to all things nerdy, strange, and specific. Each Friday host (Comedian/Writer) "$pay¢e" and co-host (Meme Troll/Writer)"Kitty", dives into the biggest news in science, art, entertainment, and pop culture. Be sure to subscribe so you can get each episode while its fresh. Comment so we can know what you guys wanna hear.
 
The Science Inside is a weekly show that goes inside the science of major news events. We take a news story each week - from a missing plane to the world cup - and dissect the science angles involved. We indulge every scientific discipline, from biology to psychology, and incorporate the insights of scientists, journalists and researchers in order to tell interesting radio stories. The Science Inside is presented by Bridget Lepere. Production by Bridget Lepere. Technical production by Kutlwa ...
 
The Weekly Bird Report with Mark Faherty can be heard every Wednesday on WCAI, the local NPR station for Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and the South Coast. Mark has been the Science Coordinator at Mass Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary since August 2007 and has led birding trips for Mass Audubon since 2002. He is past president of the Cape Cod Bird Club and current member of the Massachusetts Avian Records Committee.
 
Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World web ...
 
See How Life Works creates films and materials to guide you on the path to Peace of Mind. Our core DVD series is based on A Course In Miracles - a spiritual process that can assist and guide anyone to release fear and guilt, allowing health, joy, and peace of mind to return. We also have a weekly podcast series hosted by the co-founder of See How Life Works, Carol Howe. Her work is grounded in science and research. With decades of teaching and counseling experience, Carol is a world-renowned ...
 
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show series
 
What did London really smell like during the great stink of 1858? What odours wafted through the Battle of Waterloo? Were cities identifiable by the lingering aromas of the various commodities produced during the industrial revolution? It may not be possible to literally go back in time and give history a sniff, but a new project is aiming to ident…
 
Cool STEM News: Machine learning could cut delays from traffic lights | Futurity (01:15) SpaceX Offshore Oil Rig Launch Pad Conversion Info | Hypebeast (08:37) Electric car batteries with five-minute charging times produced | The Guardian (11:39) Humans could move to this floating asteroid belt colony in the next 15 years, astrophysicist says | Liv…
 
On today’s ASF podcast, ASF funded researcher Ileena Mitra from the lab of Dr. Melissa Gymrek at UCSD will explain a new type of “de novo” genetic mutation. Those are those spontaneous mutation that happen in kids with ASD but not parents or family members. So where did they come from? Well, this study looks at a mutation that affects tandem repeat…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we hear from Shi En Kim, who is doing a PhD in molecular engineering at the University of Chicago. Kim is also a student contributor to Physics World and she explains that writing about a wide range of research in materials and nanoscience fits in with her penchant for interdisciplinary science – …
 
Happy New Year! This special episode previews some of the biggest science stories to keep an eye on over the coming year. Coronavirus, the story that’s defined our lives for the past year, will continue to evolve and unfold. The team digs into what life will look like as vaccinations eventually allow us to come out the other side of the pandemic. T…
 
As we continue to discover new mutant variants of the covid-19 virus, the team looks at how these will impact vaccination efforts and discuss the long-term implications of virus evolution. They also bring exciting news of a new dinosaur discovery, a sauropod that is among the biggest animals of all time. And staying with dinos, they highlight the U…
 
Some wildfires produce so much heat that they create their own thunderstorms, which drive huge amounts of smoke high up into the atmosphere. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, the meteorologist David Peterson of the US Naval Research Laboratory describes how these pyrocumulonimbus events occur and why it is important to understand…
 
Ian Sample and producer Madeleine discuss what science, outside of the pandemic, they’ll be looking out for in 2021. Joined by Prof Gillian Wright and the Guardian’s global environment editor Jonathan Watts, they explore exciting space missions and critical climate change conferences. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/scien…
 
On the morning of January 7, after a few days of moderate, mostly northerly winds, Sue Finnegan and Alex Burdo pulled into the parking lot at First Encounter Beach in Eastham to find some seabirds on the move. Watching from the car to avoid the biting cold, they soon realized that among the Razorbills and Dovekies were some pudgy, dusky-faced birds…
 
The emergence of more infectious variants of Sars-CoV-2 has raised questions about just how long our vaccines will remain effective for. Although there is little evidence that the current vaccines won’t work against the new variants, as the virus continues to mutate scientists are preparing themselves for having to make changes to the vaccines in r…
 
Recorded on Jan. 15th 2020 Cool STEM News: The dire wolf was a distinct species, different from the gray wolf, biologists discover (01:22) The UK Is Developing Nuclear-Powered Space Exploration for Faster Mars Trips | Vice (8:44) The realization of a single-quantum-dot heat valve | Phys.Org (15:58) Lenovo launches AR glasses for enterprise | Tech C…
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Allan Attridge joins the conversation to discuss 2020 camera sales, the ominous OM Digital Solutions, whether we need new displays, some random stuff about Kodak and Via Getty. Thanks very much for listening! Story 1: BCN+R data shows digital camera sales in Japan were down 40% year-over-year (via DPReview) Rel…
 
The coronavirus vaccines that have been approved so far all require two doses to be given 3-4 weeks apart. But the UK has chosen to delay the time between doses to 12 weeks, so it can roll out the vaccine to more people more quickly. This week the team examines whether this is the right move, and whether it’s safe. Also on the show, they explore th…
 
The new Covid variant, B117, is rapidly spreading around the UK and has been detected in many other countries. Although it is about 50% more infectious than previous variants, B117 does not seem to cause more severe disease or be immune to current vaccines. Yet it has raised concerns over how the virus may adapt to our antibodies and vaccines in th…
 
Some weeks I’m scraping the bottom of the birding barrel looking for “Bird Report” content. This is not one of those weeks. No, this past week brought the opposite problem, the one where a truly absurd number of noteworthy bird happenings coincide, leaving me wondering how to tie them all together.저자 Mark Faherty
 
Over the course of the pandemic, scientists have been monitoring emerging genetic changes to Sars-Cov-2. Mutations occur naturally as the virus replicates but if they confer an advantage – like being more transmissible – that variant of the virus may go on to proliferate. This was the case with the ‘UK’ or B117 variant, which is about 50% more cont…
 
Everyone needs some physical activity, but people on the spectrum typically get less activity than those not diagnosed with ASD. Why? There are multiple reasons, but as it turns out it can’t all be blamed on the obvious culprit of increased screen time or video game use. Those can be reasons why teenagers get less activity, but not specifically tho…
 
Recorded on Jan. 10th 2021 Cool STEM News: New Discovery Could Lead to Cheaper And More Efficient Water Desalination | Science Alert (01:37) Holotron: A Robotic Exosuit for Virtual Reality | Digital Trends (06:39) AI Microscope Confirms Tumor Removal - In Minutes? | Interesting Engineering (16:37) New Mercedes Screen Will Span Nearly Entire Width o…
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Steve Brazill joins the discussion for new ways for photographers to defend their copyright in the US, why-oh-why do we need a 32MP selfie camera, new monitors from Dell at CES, repurposing IMAX lenses and Google taking a feature away from their flagship phones. All this and more, thanks as always for listening…
 
Two fast-spreading variants of coronavirus have been discovered in the UK and South Africa. With case numbers soaring, it’s feared these variants could lead to a massive wave of new infections around the world. The team examines why the mutations allow the virus to spread more quickly, what this means for the effectiveness of covid vaccines, and wh…
 
Using computers to process natural human language is notoriously difficult, so perhaps its not surprising that researchers are turning to quantum computers. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Bob Coecke of Cambridge Quantum Computing explains why natural language processing is “quantum native” – which makes it a perfect candidate …
 
There is something undeniably appealing about the cosmos that has kept humans staring upwards in awe – from our Palaeolithic ancestors to modern astronomers. Humans are natural stargazers, but with light pollution increasingly obscuring our view of the heavens, is our relationship with the night sky set to change? In the second of two episodes, Lin…
 
It’s finally over, and what a white-knuckle ride it’s been. While I could easily be talking about 2020, I actually mean that the last of the Christmas Bird Counts are finally in the books. That makes this a bittersweet time for some birders. In my case, there are some very warm, absurdly thick socks mostly reserved for these 12-hour blitzes that I …
 
The history of humanity is intimately entwined with the cosmos. The stars have influenced religion, art, mathematics and science – we appear naturally drawn to look up in wonder. Now, with modern technology, our view of the cosmos is changing. It is in reachable distance of our spacecrafts and satellites, and yet because of light pollution we see l…
 
Welcome to 2021! Over the holiday break, autism researchers were busy coming up with answers to important questions: 1) how does an environmental exposure relevant to ASD change gene expression and 2) does Telehealth work and for whom? The first question was addressed by an ASF undergraduate who published in Nature. He is going to go on to do great…
 
Recorded on Jan. 3rd 2021 Cool STEM News: Augmented reality in surgery: World's first “real” holographically navigated spine surgery at Balgrist University Hospital | News.Microsoft (01:29) The Air Force's Solar-Beaming Spacecraft | Solar Power From Space | Popular Mechanics (08:01) Large transporter protein linked to schizophrenia | MedicalXpress …
 
This year, the Sars-CoV-2 virus has come to dominate both the headlines and our lives. In the second of two episodes reviewing the science of the pandemic so far, the Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, its science editor, Ian Sample, and producer Madeleine Finlay give their thoughts on what has happened over 2020, alongside professors Eleanor…
 
For various reasons, this year’s Nantucket, Stellwagen Bank, and Mid-Cape Christmas Bird Counts all ended up scheduled on the same day, Sunday the 27 th . This is unprecedented as far as I know - these counts share some of the same personnel, so normally the organizers coordinate on dates. But as we well know, nothing is normal in 2020. Luckily, th…
 
There have been a number of incredible science stories in 2020, from AI deciphering the facial expressions of mice to the discovery of a black hole just 1,000 light-years from Earth. Yet, it was the Sars-CoV-2 virus that came to dominate both the headlines and our lives. In the first of two episodes, health editor Sarah Boseley, science editor Ian …
 
Recorded on Dec. 27th 2020 Cool News: Alien Hunters Discover Mysterious Signal from Proxima Centauri | Scientific American (02:38) Airbus reveals hydrogen 'plane pods' concept | Euractive (10:16) Amazon Zoox unveils self-driving robotaxi | CNBC (17:05) Exclusive: Apple targets car production by 2024 and eyes 'next level' battery technology - source…
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Ant Pruitt joins the conversation to discuss the woes of wedding photographers during the pandemic, where the Leica SL2-S sits in the marketplace, How Apple ProRaw might be positively disruptive and what happens when you forget about your beer can camera for eight years. All this and more – thanks for listening…
 
As Covid-19 spread around the world, conspiracy theories about its origin, severity and prevention followed closely behind. Now attention has turned to vaccines. False claims circulated among anti-vaxxer groups include the theory that Covid vaccines are being used to implant microchips in people and that they will alter a person’s DNA. In the secon…
 
When I say Christmas Bird Count to most people, I often wonder if they think I’m referring to the avian enumeration in that old song, you know, “four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves”, etc. Come to think of it, fully half of the gifts from that person’s true love are birds. I feel like I could have been a real Casanova in the 18 t…
 
Less than a year since Covid-19 was genetically sequenced, vaccinations against it have begun. Despite being a cause for celebration, the vaccines have been met with some public hesitancy. In the first of a two-part exploration into Covid-19 vaccine scepticism, Nicola Davis speaks to Dr Samantha Vanderslott and Dr Caitjan Gainty about why some peop…
 
This week’s podcast is the Year End Summary of scientific discoveries in 2020. Guess what leads these highlights? That’s right! The COVID-19 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement. Even though these events significantly affected the lives of people with autism, and will heavily influence future research directions, there were actually other i…
 
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