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The University of Chicago International and Area Studies Multimedia Outreach Source is intended as a resource for students, teachers, and the general public. It makes available recordings of conferences, lectures, and performances sponsored and organized by: the Center for International Studies; the Human Rights Program; the Center for East Asian Studies; the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies; the Center for Latin American Studies; the Center for Middle Eastern Studies; a ...
 
The University of Chicago International and Area Studies Multimedia Outreach Source is intended as a resource for students, teachers, and the general public. It makes available recordings of conferences, lectures, and performances sponsored and organized by: the Center for International Studies; the Human Rights Program; the Center for East Asian Studies; the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies; the Center for Latin American Studies; the Center for Middle Eastern Studies; a ...
 
The Project on Prosperity and Development (PPD) studies the central role of the private sector and governments in emerging economies and fragile or conflict-affected areas. The Global Food Security Program provides guidance to policymakers to ensure that U.S. foreign assistance and agricultural development programs are sustainable, efficient, and effective. The Humanitarian Agenda identifies and analyzes trends in the evolving humanitarian environment to improve delivery of aid and access to ...
 
Fearless music activists. Savvy tech entrepreneurs. Social disrupters. Into Africa shatters the narratives that dominate U.S. perceptions of Africa. Host Judd Devermont, Africa program director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington D.C., sits down with policymakers, journalists, academics and other trailblazers in African affairs to shine a spotlight on the faces spearheading cultural, political, and economic change on the continent.
 
Global Security Briefing provides regular insights from leading international experts to help you make sense of the far-reaching changes affecting international security around the globe. Hosted by analysts from RUSI's International Security Studies team, the podcast looks at how the UK can best shape its foreign and security policies in an increasingly dynamic international environment.
 
Hosted by Dan Runde, William A. Schreyer Chair and Director, Project on Prosperity and Development, Building the Future explores topics at the intersection of global development, foreign policy, and national security. In each episode, Dan sits down for a discussion with a leading expert from government, the private sector, and international organizations to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the world today.
 
The Japan Memo is a monthly podcast series that unpacks why Japan matters in today’s regional and global geopolitical landscape. In each episode, the co-hosts, Robert Ward and Yuka Koshino of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) Japan Chair Programme, will bring in strategists, experts and practitioners from around the world to examine how Japan is using its diplomatic, economic and military tools to achieve its strategic goals, and what lessons it offers to other countri ...
 
Coming up on today's show: Frank Aum, visiting scholar at the U.S.-Korea Institute at the John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, former Senior Advisor for North Korea in the office of the Secretary of Defense in the Obama administration, talks about President Trump's latest threats to North Korea, where the country is in terms of building nuclear weapons, the ramifications of Trump's words, and the options available. Last NFL season, the quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers ...
 
Medical Humanities is a leading international journal that reflects the whole field of medical humanities. Medical Humanities aims to encourage a high academic standard for this evolving and developing subject and to enhance professional and public discussion. It features original articles relevant to the delivery of healthcare, the formulation of public health policy, the experience of being ill and of caring for those who are ill, as well as case conferences, educational case studies, book ...
 
Let’s Talk Risk with the Society for Risk Analysis, the world’s leading authority on risk science and its applications, helps bring clarity to the world of risk, uncertainty, and ambiguity. Visit www.sra.org for more information on the topics discussed in these episodes and for more studies found in Risk Analysis: An International Journal
 
"Sigrun is like the FEMALE James Bond of Online Marketing! ...a True INTERNATIONAL Woman of Mystery...and Inspiration!" - James Wedmore, host of the Mind Your Business podcast. ... Discover through inspiring stories, case studies, and interviews how you can create your own lifestyle business. Sigrun shares the ‘7 Stages of a Profitable Online Business’ and other proven strategies that help you turn your passion into profits. Her featured experts include entrepreneurs like James Wedmore, Kimr ...
 
North Korea is the Impossible State. Each week join the people who know the most about North Korea—The Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Victor Cha, Mike Green, and Sue Mi Terry—for an insider's discussion with host H. Andrew Schwartz about the United States’ top national security priority. Email your questions to ImpossibleState@csis.org.
 
Inside Cyber Diplomacy presents a wide-ranging and thought-provoking look at international cybersecurity, its challenges, and practices. Through candid interviews with experts around the world, co-hosts Jim Lewis and Chris Painter explore how diplomacy and negotiation have shaped the field. This podcast is made possible by the generous support of the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore and the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
 
These podcasts are recordings from the Cutting Edge Issues in Development Thinking & Practice lecture series 2020/21, a visiting lecture series coordinated by Professor in Practice in the Department, Duncan Green and Professor of Development Studies, Professor James Putzel. The Cutting Edge series provides students and guests with invaluable insights into the practical world of international development, with guest lecturers sharing their expertise and inviting discussion on an exciting rang ...
 
Interviews with authors of articles from JAMA Psychiatry. JAMA Psychiatry is an international peer-reviewed journal for clinicians, scholars, and research scientists in psychiatry, mental health, behavioral science, and allied fields. JAMA Psychiatry strives to publish original, state-of-the-art studies and commentaries of general interest to clinicians, scholars, and research scientists in the field. The journal seeks to inform and to educate its readers as well as to stimulate debate and f ...
 
Unpacking Impact explores how rapid digital transformation shapes economics, culture, jobs, and public policy. What can you do now to prepare for the impact of rapid digital transformation? How can business leaders, policymakers, and entrepreneurs evolve with this seismic trend? Co-hosted by CSIS’s own Andrew Schwartz and investor / entrepreneur Navin Thukkaram, this podcast aims to answer these questions by speaking with thought leaders in the center of the action.
 
Hosted by the Dr Stephen Booy Managing Director of successful mentoring management training company MBF-International. This series of podcasts that explore our innate and striving talents, their characteristics and impacts, and the opportunities from the application of The Kolbe Wisdom(tm). The series will include case studies and experiences from individuals and teams in organisations who have embraced the potential of working with The Kolbe Wisdom and their Conative Instincts.
 
AI. Social Media. Blockchain. Gene-edited babies. Are these the greatest innovations in history or the greatest threat to humanity? Humanity, Wired makes sense of the human rights impact of technology today and tomorrow. Host Amy Lehr, Human Rights Initiative director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington D.C., sits down with human rights defenders, policymakers and technologists to discuss how to make technology work for us, not against us.
 
With the International Olympic Committee as one of our founding members, the AISTS provides post-graduate Sport Management education, applied research and an engaging platform of connections. Discover the world of sports management through our exclusive podcasts focusing on Sports Medicine, featuring interviews with leading experts, professionals and academics. This podcast series was created by AISTS Head of Sports Medicine, Dr Boris Gojanavic (@DrSportSante) and are entirely scripted, reco ...
 
Since its founding in 1992 within the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, the Center for the Advanced Study (CASI) has continued to uphold Penn's global reputation as a leading U.S. institution of research in South Asian studies and scholarship on India. CASI's goals are to engage in policy-relevant research focused on the challenges facing contemporary India; to nurture students' interest in contemporary India through interactions with Visiting Scholars and opportun ...
 
Human rights are an important component of the stability and security of any state. CSIS examines critical issues affecting human rights and human security around the world, as well as opportunities to enhance and broaden support for universal freedoms. CSIS research on this topic is led by the Human Rights Initiative (HRI). Find the latest research from our scholars and CSIS events on this topic below.
 
Lane DeGregory, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter at the Tampa Bay Times, is a masterful storyteller. Each episode of WriteLane is a discussion of craft, using prime examples of narrative journalism. DeGregory joined the Times in 2000 after working for two papers in Virginia. She has won dozens of national awards, including twice winning Scripps Howard’s Ernie Pyle Award for human interest writing, eight National Headliner Awards and eight awards from the American Society of Newspaper Editor ...
 
This podcast series explores books with ideas for positive social and environmental change. Each month we feature a book and an interview with its author. The discussions give an insight on the themes covered in the book, exploring the challenges and discoveries, and why the issues matter for progressive and sustainable development globally. Send your comments and suggestions to betweenthelines@ids.ac.uk Follow IDS on Twitter @IDS_UK #IDSbetweenthelines This podcast is brought to you by the ...
 
The "Lapses" project, developed for the Pavilion of Turkey, consists of projects that demonstrate how the perception of "occurring events" can vary and lead to the differing narrations of history because of lapses in collective memory. The project has been realized through works by two artists: Banu Cennetoglu's "CATALOG" and Ahmet Ögüt's "Exploded City". Both projects reveal the possibility for diverse memory formations or diverse narratives, conceivable through lapses.??The project is acco ...
 
America has an unusual history. It did not begin with ethnic homogeneity or a long, shared cultural history. It began as a set of ideals enshrined in our Constitution and the Bill of Rights. In “The Engine Room of Democracy,” CSIS President and CEO John J. Hamre discusses with former government officials and policymakers how the fundamental ideals in our constitutional democracy are applied every day and why these ideals should remain the bedrock of our society.
 
In 2020 Ashoka’s Globalizer launched a new podcast series on systems change with the first 6-episode season. That season was produced in partnership between Fergal Byrne, the host of the well-known Inspiring Social Entrepreneurs podcast, and Odin Muehlenbein, partner at Ashoka Germany and co-lead of the Systems Unit at Ashoka Globalizer. The first season explores how experienced social entrepreneurs - Jordan Kassalow, Jeroo Billimoria, Michael Sani, Kendis Peris - and Silvia Bastante, as a s ...
 
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Why has the United States, the world’s premier military and economic power, struggled recently to achieve its foreign policy desiderata? How might America’s leaders reconsider the application of power for a world of asymmetric and unconventional threats? In his new book, Power and Complacency: American Survival in an Age of International Competitio…
 
Meryl Altman's new book Beauvoir in Time, published by Brill Rodopi Press (2020), situates Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex (1949) in its historical context and responds to criticism that muddles what she actually said about sex, race and class. She takes up three aspects of Beauvoir's work today’s feminists find problematic: the characterizatio…
 
Distributing Condoms and Hope: The Racialized Politics of Youth Sexual Health (U California Press, 2020) is a feminist ethnographic account of how youth sexual health programs in the racially and economically stratified city of “Millerston” reproduce harm in the marginalized communities they are meant to serve. Chris Barcelos makes space for the st…
 
In Radiant Infrastructures: Media, Environment, and Cultures of Uncertainty (Duke UP, 2020), Rahul Mukherjee explores how the media coverage of nuclear power plants and cellular phone antennas in India—what he calls radiant infrastructures—creates environmental publics: groups of activists, scientists, and policy makers who use media to influence p…
 
Why do we find pervasive gender-based discrimination, exclusion and violence in India when the Indian constitution builds an inclusive democracy committed to gender equality? This is the puzzle that animates Natasha Behl’s book, Gendered Citizenship: Understanding Gendered Violence in Democratic India (Oxford University Press, 2019), but it is, as …
 
Jyoti Gulati Balachandran's Narrative Pasts: The Making of a Muslim Community in Gujarat, c. 1400-1650 (Oxford University Press, 2020) explores the complex power of Sufi texts in creating Muslim communities in Gujarat from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Balachandran focuses on three main Sufi saints, including Ahmad Khattu, whose disci…
 
Guest host Jane Kaczmarek presents three stories where facts, beliefs, and fabrications coincide. Essayist Samantha Irby debunks nature, fresh air, and sunshine in “The Case for Remaining Indoors,” performed by Retta. Rebecca Makkai shares tattered facts about a terrorist in “Everything We Know About the Bomber,” performed by John Cameron Mitchell.…
 
Judd Devermont is joined by Anouar Boukhars (African Center for Strategic Studies), Jason Warner (United States Military Academy in West Point), and Emily Estelle (American Enterprise Institute) to discuss the dangers of overemphasizing or underselling the ties between regional groups and global Jihadi networks. Guests also cover French President M…
 
The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is sometimes described as “the most important governmental office no one has ever heard of” and it certainly occupies a very important position and role in the functioning of the American presidency and the way that the Executive branch operates. Political Scientists Meena Bose (Hofstra University) and Andr…
 
This interview features a candid conversation with Greg Bailey, seasoned scholar of Sanskrit narrative Literature, on his multi-decade work on the Purāṇas and Mahābhārata, and on his new novel In Search of Bliss: A Tale of Early Buddhism (Vanguard Press, 2019). About the novel: Kshemapala is a monk from the North who has been tasked with an importa…
 
In this episode of Building the Future, Dan is joined by Dr. Raul Hinojosa-Ojeda, Associate Professor at UCLA and author of The Trump Paradox: Migration, Trade, and Racial Politics in US-Mexico Integration. The conversation follows Dr. Hinojosa-Ojeda’s inspiration for The Trump Paradox and the polarization of immigration and trade in the United Sta…
 
Have you ever thought about starting your own podcast? Having a successful podcast can be amazing for your business, but producing it means hundreds of hours of work, unyielding consistency, and having a loyal listenership. Trust me, I know. Christine McAlister, my guest this week on The Sigrun Show, has a different approach. She helps high-achievi…
 
Photography emerged in the 1840s in the United States, and it became a visual medium that documents the harsh realities of enslavement. Similarly, the photography culture grew during the Civil War, and it became an important material that archived this unprecedented war. Deborah Willis's The Black Civil War Soldier: A Visual History of Conflict and…
 
In Everything Ancient Was Once New: Indigenous Persistence from Hawaiʻi to Kahiki (U Hawaii Press, 2021), Emalani Case explores Indigenous persistence through the concept of Kahiki, a term that is at once both an ancestral homeland for Kānaka Maoli (Hawaiians) and the knowledge that there is life to be found beyond Hawaiʻi’s shores. It is therefore…
 
Andrew Jenks' book Collaboration in Space and the Search for Peace on Earth (Anthem Press, 2021) explores the era of space collaboration (from 1970 to the present). This period has been largely ignored by historians in favor of a focus on the earlier space race. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, a key program and catalyst for Détente, marked the trans…
 
The geography of American slavery was continental, argues Dr. Kevin Waite, an assistant professor at Durham University, in West of Slavery: The Southern Dream of a Transcontinental Empire (UNC Press, 2021). Rather than being confined to the South, the institution of slavery infected North America as the American empire expanded across the Mississip…
 
Marching across occupied France in 1944, American GI Leroy Stewart had neither death nor glory on his mind: he was worried about his underwear. "I ran into a new problem when we walked," Stewart wrote, "the shorts and I didn't get along. They would crawl up on me all the time." Crawling underwear may have been a small price to pay for the liberatio…
 
A special Moth Radio Hour with stories originating from our annual "Love Hurts" StorySLAM. Love lost, love found, unwanted spotlights and the family we choose. This episode is hosted by Moth Senior Director Jenifer Hixson. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted by: Jenifer Hixson Storytellers: A…
 
Today we are talking to a New Yorker staff writer Carrie Battan about her piece from March of this year "How Politics Tested Ravelry and the Crafting Community" – about how a quote unquote “nice website about yarn” got involved in radical politics. Battan began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015 and became a staff writer in 2018. She has contri…
 
It’s hard to imagine a place more central to American mythology today than Silicon Valley. To outsiders, the region glitters with the promise of extraordinary wealth and innovation. But behind this image lies another Silicon Valley, one segregated by race, class, and nationality in complex and contradictory ways. Its beautiful landscape lies atop u…
 
The legendary Magnum photo agency has long been associated with heroic lone wolf male photographers such as Frank Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson, roaming the world in search of the “decisive moment” – the perfect shot that captured the essence of a major news story. Nadya Bair’s highly original book The Decisive Network: Magnum Photos and the Postw…
 
The rights of pregnant workers as well as (the lack of) paid maternity leave have increasingly become topics of a major policy debate in the United States. Yet, few discussions have focused on the U.S. military, where many of the latest policy changes focus on these very issues. Despite the armed forces' increases to maternity-related benefits, ser…
 
Americans rely on credit to provide for their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and other daily necessities and the 2008 financial crisis demonstrated how they relied on private financial institutions that encouraged risky lending practices. Yet federal policy makers did little to change their approach to curbing risky lending practices and …
 
In a narrative-redefining approach, Engaging the Evil Empire: Washington, Moscow, and the Beginning of the End of the Cold War (Cornell UP, 2020) dramatically alters how we look at the beginning of the end of the Cold War. Tracking key events in US-Soviet relations across the years between 1980 and 1985, Simon Miles shows that covert engagement gav…
 
As soon as US media and politicians became aware of AIDS in the early 1980s, fingers were pointed not only at the gay community but also at other countries and migrant communities, particularly Haitians, as responsible for spreading the virus. Evangelical leaders, public health officials, and the Reagan administration quickly capitalized on widespr…
 
Poet Ariana Brown searches for new origins in her debut book We Are Owed. (Grieveland Press, 2021). Brown has had over ten years of experience writing, performing, and teaching poetry that struggles towards freedom for all Black peoples. She identifies on her website as a “queer Black Mexican American poet” whose lived experiences within anti-Black…
 
The Eastern Professional Basketball League (1946-78) was fast and physical, often played in tiny, smoke-filled gyms across the northeast and featuring the best players who just couldn’t make the NBA—many because of unofficial quotas on Black players, some because of scandals, and others because they weren’t quite good enough in the years when the N…
 
In First to Fall: Elijah Lovejoy and the Fight for a Free Press in the Age of Slavery (Pegasus Books, 2021), Ken Ellingwood takes readers back to the first true test of the First Amendment's guarantees of free speech and a free press through the story of abolitionist newspaper editor Elijah Lovejoy. The story unfolds during the 1830s, a period know…
 
Guest host Baron Vaughn presents three stories in which people “’fess up.” The title gives it away in “As a 28-Year-Old Latino, I’m Shocked My New Novel, Memoirs of a Middle-Aged White Lady, Has Been So Poorly Received” by Carlos Greaves. In the Heights’ Anthony Ramos performs. A family secret is revealed in “1,000-Year-Old Ghosts” by Laura Chow Re…
 
Medical Humanities' Editor-in-Chief, Brandy Schillace, talks to Dr. Eleanor Janega, a medieval historian, about comparisons between COVID-19 and the Black Death. Read the blog post, which includes the transcript of the podcast, here: https://blogs.bmj.com/medical-humanities/2021/07/15/going-medieval-historical-comparisons-of-plague-and-pandemic/…
 
Guest lecturer, Saleemul Huq joins us from Dhaka to talk to us about "Human Induced Climate Change: Dealing with loss and damage". The lecture is part of the LSE ID Cutting Edge Issues in Development Thinking & Practice series.저자 LSE Department of International Development
 
Babbling Barbarians: How Translators Keep Us Civilized is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Princeton University Professor David Bellos, author of the bestselling book, Is That A Fish in Your Ear? Translation and the Meaning of Everything, many fascinating features of language and translation are explored at length.…
 
In 1928 linguist Yuen Ren Chao had reason to celebrate. The Nationalist government had just recognized his system for writing Chinese, Gwoyeu Romatzyh, so he gleefully wrote (using the system) in his diary: "G.R. yii yu jeou yueh 26 ry gong buh le. Hooray!!!" (G.R. was officially announced on September 26. Hooray!!!). He was not the only one excite…
 
The First World War poet and composer Ivor Gurney (1890–1937) spent the last fifteen years of his life confined in a Kent mental hospital before dying prematurely of tuberculosis. How good was Gurney's war poetry, and has his music stood the test of time? Why did try to re-write Shakespeare's plays? How far do recently uncovered archives transform …
 
It might seem somewhat paradoxical that in the Wars of 1898 and their aftermath—the era in which the United States expanded its imperial reach deep into the Caribbean and Pacific—international law became a feature of US foreign policy. In the midst of all of the militarism (think of Teddy Roosevelt’s roughriders storming Cuba), colonial conquest, a…
 
Political Scientist Nathan Kalmoe has written a fascinating historical and political exploration of the connections between violence and partisanship before, during, and after the American Civil War. This book brings together work by historians and political scientists and straddles both disciplines in the examination of the way that partisan polit…
 
Borders are “important”: they define, in legal terms, who we are, our identity, and our rights. Except borders are rarely imposed with any thought to the people actually living there. And once a border is imposed, it can radically change the lives of those who live alongside it, dividing communities forever more. India’s border, imposed by colonial…
 
During the height of Muslim power in Mughal South Asia, Hindu and Muslim scholars worked collaboratively to translate a large body of Hindu Sanskrit texts into the Persian language. Translating Wisdom reconstructs the intellectual processes and exchanges that underlay these translations. Using as a case study the 1597 Persian rendition of the Yoga-…
 
In this episode of Building the Future, Dan is joined by Dr. Richard Feinberg, an economics professor at the University of California, San Diego with over 40s years’ experience in inter-American relations. Dr. Feinberg recently published “Widening the Aperture: Nearshoring in Our ‘Near Abroad”, a report on Biden administration’s domestic economic a…
 
Have you ever looked at the achievements of others and thought: If only I could do that, too? Here’s a simple truth: Successful people aren’t naturally excellent at what they do — they work to be that way. Excellence is a way of life. This week, I had a very interesting chat with Juliet Ehimuan about excellence. Juliet leads Google’s business strat…
 
In this episode, the panel discuss the fast-evolving security environment in the Black Sea region, including the significance of the recent confrontation between the UK warship HMS Defender and Russia’s armed forces in waters off Crimea. Dr Dmitri Gorenburg, Senior Research Scientist at CNA in the US, and Dr Maryna Vorotnyuk, RUSI Research Fellow, …
 
Raúl Diego Rivera Hernández's book Narratives of Vulnerability in Mexico's War on Drugs (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020) explores the current human rights crisis created by the War on Drugs in Mexico. It focuses on three vulnerable communities that have felt the impacts of this war firsthand: undocumented Central American migrants in transit to the Unite…
 
Literature is a technology like any other. And the writers we revere--from Homer, Shakespeare, Austen, and others--each made a unique technical breakthrough that can be viewed as both a narrative and neuroscientific advancement. Literature's great invention was to address problems we could not solve: not how to start a fire or build a boat, but how…
 
This book provides a rigorously researched, critically comparative introduction to yoga. Anya P. Foxen and Christa Kuberry's Is this Yoga?: Concepts, Histories, and the Complexities of Modern Practice (Routledge, 2021) recognizes the importance of contemporary understandings of yoga and, at the same time, provides historical context and complexity …
 
We live in a networked world. Online social networking platforms and the World Wide Web have changed how society thinks about connectivity. Because of the technological nature of such networks, their study has predominantly taken place within the domains of computer science and related scientific fields. But arts and humanities scholars are increas…
 
Southern women of all classes, races, and walks of life practiced music during and after the Civil War. Dr. Candace Bailey examines the history of southern women through the lens of these musical pursuits, uncovering the ways that music's transmission, education, circulation, and repertory help us understand its meaning in the women's culture of th…
 
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