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Welcome to the 2012 Johns Hopkins University Foreign Affairs Symposium, entitled The Paradox of Progress: Chasing Advancement Amidst Global Crisis. The 2012 Foreign Affairs Symposium invites you to take a deeper look into this paradox of progress: admire the things we have accomplished and take a critical view of the new and ongoing problems we must face and overcome. Whether in politics, the economy, the military, or the environment, our continued quest for advancement often creates new cha ...
 
The State Department's Office of Public Liaison and Intergovernmental Affairs works around the clock to think of how the U.S. Department of State can better engage with the American people by increasing public awareness and involvement in the Department and its work. In order to support an ongoing dialogue, we arrange conference calls and video conference briefings, which we plan to begin broadcasting on Blog Talk Radio. Tune in for insight and updates on US Foreign Policy.
 
Each week, Foreign Policy’s Amy Mackinnon, will recommend one podcast from around the world, interview the host, and play an excerpt. This curated show is designed to help listeners interested in the things we are—great stories, compelling interviews, and cogent analysis on international affairs—sort through the overwhelming variety of podcasts out there and find the best ones. And occasionally you’ll hear audio from our own newsroom. FP Playlist replaces our flagship podcast First Person. S ...
 
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show series
 
COP26 was billed as the make or break event in the fight against climate change. In conversation with Quynh Le Vo, Sharon Seah, coordinator of the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute’s Climate Change in Southeast Asia Programme, discusses Southeast Asian countries’ key priorities going into the conference and the commitments they made in Glasgow, including…
 
No moment has changed the modern Middle East more fundamentally than the year 1979. Within months, three major events sparked a deep rivalry that plagues the world to this day. In Iran, a popular revolt took down the Shah, but a theocratic government seized the vacuum and took his place. In Saudi Arabia, a group of insurgents opposed to the House o…
 
Everybody eats. We may even consider ourselves experts on the topic, or at least Instagram experts. But are we aware that the shrimp in our freezer may be farmed and frozen in Vietnam, the grapes in our fruit bowl shipped from Chile, and the coffee in our coffee maker grown in Nicaragua, roasted in Germany, and distributed in Canada? Whether we kno…
 
Is it possible that efforts to make war more humane can actually make it more common and thus more destructive? This tension at the heart of this query lies at the heart of Samuel Moyn's new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War (Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 2021). He draws fascinating connections between literary fig…
 
Foreign Policy recommends: Heat of the Moment We wanted to share with you one of our latest episodes from our climate change podcast, Heat of the Moment. How a coal town in Wyoming is ensuring a just transition for its workers as we move away from fossil fuels. Subscribe on your favorite podcast app or listen on this page. See acast.com/privacy for…
 
Jeffrey Bachman's edited volume Cultural Genocide: Law, Politics, and Global Manifestations (Routledge, 2019) asks where the boundaries between genocide and other kinds of mass atrocity violence rest and what the stakes are in locating them here rather than there. Bachman, Senior Professorial Lecturer at the American University and a co-host of thi…
 
With COP26 and high fossil fuel prices, energy is back in the headlines. And Russia, as one of the world’s largest producers of hydrocarbons, is part of the conversation--most recently, in Putin’s refusal to expand oil production to ease global prices. The world is coming up on three major transitions—peak use of fossil fuels, renewables competing …
 
As the Covid-19 pandemic spread to Europe and other parts of the globe in spring of 2020, the Chinese government started reporting donations of Personal Protective Equipment as well as other medical supplies to areas experiencing severe shortage. Listen to Dr. Lauri Paltemaa and Dr. Hermann Aubié discuss their research on the exact nature of China'…
 
One Hundred Years of Solitude is a revered classic today fifty five years after it was first published in 1967. Today I talked to Alvaro Santana Acuña a sociologist and historian who describes the ingredients that went into manufacturing the success of this book. In Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global …
 
This holiday season we’re all seeing the impact of shifts in the global trade system firsthand while shopping: shortages, high prices, and long shipping delays. The Economist’s Soumaya Keynes joins Deep Dish to explain why this situation is about more than just supply chains or COVID-19—it's about politics and the way our world is dismantling the r…
 
Foreign Policy recommends: Fat Leonard This week on FP Playlist, we feature Fat Leonard, a show by Project Brazen and PRX. This debut episode kicks off the shocking story of con artist Leonard Francis — the man who corrupted the Navy. Subscribe on your favorite podcast app or listen on this page. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform…
 
Rodrigo Durterte has brought the world’s attention to the Philippines with his brash, populist rhetoric and tough-on-crime policies. In this episode we look at the president’s rise to power, his major foreign, and domestic policies, and to what extent he will step back from Filipino politics. Joining us to answer these questions is Joshua Kurlantzi…
 
Nations have powerful incentives to ensure that their military alliances are well-structured. Successful military alliances set long-lasting foundations for global and regional order, while unsuccessful ones can perpetuate and widen conflict. In Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford UP, 2021), Kuo a…
 
The next world war is 13 years away—that is, if you live in the world envisioned by Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, 2034: A Novel of the Next World War (Penguin, 2021). When writing about the intersection of combat and diplomacy, the co-authors draw from experience. Ackerman has worked in the White House and served five tours of duty as a Mari…
 
Katarzyna (Kasia) Bartoszyńska is an assistant professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies at Ithaca College. Her research and teaching focuses on the novel form and the theories connected to it, combining a formalist investigation of textual mechanics with an interest in studies of gender, sexuality, race, and world literature. Prof. Barto…
 
During the height of the Cold War, passionate idealists across the US and Africa came together to fight for Black self-determination and the antiracist remaking of society. Beginning with the 1957 Ghanaian independence celebration, the optimism and challenges of African independence leaders were publicized to African Americans through community-bas…
 
Deep Dish is taking this week off for the Thanksgiving holiday in the US, but we'll be back next week with a new episode! In the meantime, here’s a quick note about Giving Tuesday. We’re able to make this show because of the support from our community of listeners —people like you! Would you consider making a tax-deductible gift this upcoming Givin…
 
Foreign Policy recommends: The Long Game This week on FP Playlist, we feature Foreign Policy Studios’ newest series, The Long Game. Each week, host Ibtihaj Muhammad tells harrowing stories of courage and conviction, both on and off the court. The Long Game host Ibtihaj sat down with FP Playlist to discuss the first female to represent Afghanistan i…
 
In late July, China conducted a test of a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile that entered low earth orbit, circled the globe, and struck a predetermined target in China. The test allegedly stunned U.S. military and intelligence officials for its complexity, with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley calling the test a near “sputnik mome…
 
In recent years the resurgence of great power competition has gripped the headlines, with new emerging powers (such as Russia and China) seeking to challenge the American and Western hegemony that has prevailed since the end of the Cold War. While the geopolitics of the Cold War era were based on ideology, the current geopolitics appear to be based…
 
What does America’s growing dependence on modern information technology systems mean for the management of its nuclear weapons? In his new book, Cyber Threats and Nuclear Weapons (Stanford University Press, 2021), Dr. Herb Lin explores the promise and peril of managing the bomb in the digital age. A Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Interna…
 
Since August, of last year there have been more coups in sub-Saharan Africa than at any time for the past two decades – Mali in August 2020, Chad in April 2020, Mali again in May 2021, Guinea in September, and Sudan just last month. In this episode we discuss the recent trends of turmoil and democratic instability in Africa as seen in these success…
 
At least 2,000 Middle Eastern migrants spent weeks trapped at checkpoints between Belarus and Poland—unable to legally enter the European Union and, until today, unable to return to Belarus or go home. Former US Ambassador to Poland Daniel Fried joins host Brian Hanson on Deep Dish to explain how Belarus’ strongman President Lukashenka weaponized t…
 
The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn’t sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich an…
 
Nearly 50 years since the European Foreign Ministers issued their first declaration on the conflict between Israel and Palestine in 1971, the European Union continues to have close political and economic ties with the region. Based exclusively on primary sources, Anders Persson's EU Diplomacy and the Israeli-Arab Conflict, 1967-2019 (Edinburgh UP, …
 
Foreign Policy recommends: Democracy! The Podcast This week on FP Playlist, we feature Democracy! The Podcast, a show by the Consortium for Elections and Political Process Strengthening. This episode explores how foreign nations are interfering in the domestic affairs of other countries by spreading misinformation — and how we as citizens can comba…
 
Nora Krug and Timothy Snyder have published On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, Graphic Edition with Ten Speed Press, 2021. The book contains the slightly updated text from Professor Snyder’s best-selling 2017 edition but now gorgeously illustrated with Professor Krug’s artwork. Timothy Snyder, the Levin Professor of History at Y…
 
Judith Shapiro and John-Andrew McNeish's book Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance (Routledge, 2021) emphasizes how the spectrum of violence associated with natural resource extraction permeates contemporary collective life. Chronicling the increasing rates of brutal suppression of local environmental and labor activists in ru…
 
Specifically, we are going to have a conversation about whether the United States can still produce and whether it even needs great leaders to tackle the challenges of the evolving international system. Joining us to help answer some of these questions is Aaron David Miller, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and auth…
 
‘Ecumenism’ and ‘independency’ suggest two distinct impulses in the history of Christianity: the desire for unity, co-operation, connectivity, and shared belief and practice, and the impulse for distinction, plurality, and contextual translation. Yet ecumenism and independency are better understood as existing in critical tension with one another. …
 
Today I talked to Rosa Abreu-Runkel about her new book Vanilla: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020). Intoxicating and evocative, vanilla is so much more than a spice rack staple. It is a flavor that has defined the entire world—and its roots reach deep into the past. With its earliest origins dating back seventy million years, the history of va…
 
As countries finalize their commitments at the UN Climate Conference, COP26, soaring global energy prices and shortages around the world emphasize our world’s current dependence on fossil fuels. The Economist’s Vijay Vaitheeswaran and the Just Transition Initiative’s Sandeep Pai join Deep Dish to explain what the energy crisis tell us about the cos…
 
On October 31st, Japan held a general election to determine the make-up of its lower house of parliament. It was also an opportunity for the ruling party’s new leader Fumio Kishida to gauge his popularity and determine the size of his government’s mandate. What do the results of this election mean for Japanese domestic policy, who exactly is Prime …
 
Did you know that you're more likely to die from a catastrophe than in a car crash? The odds that a typical US resident will die from a catastrophic event—for example, nuclear war, bioterrorism, or out-of-control artificial intelligence—have been estimated at 1 in 6. That's fifteen times more likely than a fatal car crash and thirty-one times more …
 
Geographic and temporal limits have typically contained modern wars—rulers can ask their populace to risk lives and treasure for so long before losing legitimacy. But wars have also been horrifyingly unlimited in cruelty. Over the course of the past two decades, American activists and government officials have sought to make war less cruel and more…
 
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