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"The boreal forest is the largest intact forest left on the planet, it holds a quarter of the world's wetlands. It is a climate regulator." You could argue there is nothing that binds Canada together like our boreal forest. It's defined by vast stands of spruce and seemingly endless lakes and swamps stretching beyond horizons. It runs in an uninter…
 
For our final episode on board the Polar Prince, sailing Atlantic Canada's Bay of Fundy, we're spending some time under the waves and looking to the skies, as we join a fascinating cross-section of scientists, students and researchers who make up this Students on Ice Ocean conservation expedition. With the team from New Brunswick's Huntsman Marine …
 
We're still riding the Bay of Fundy waves this episode with the Students on Ice - Ocean Conservation Expedition. Today we're leaving the sea and heading up the Point Wolf River in New Brunswick's Fundy National Park, with the story of a remarkable effort to bring the Fundy Atlantic Salmon back from the brink of extinction. A unique subspecies, unli…
 
For our 50th episode, Explore is taking to the seas! We join a Students on Ice expedition to the Bay of Fundy aboard the Polar Prince, on an Ocean Conservation Expedition led by RCGS Fellow and SOI President Geoff Green. This is a working expedition with scientists, researchers, commercial fishers, Indigenous youth, students and artists. Over the n…
 
It's mushroom season, so we happily took up Keith Seifert on his offer to go on a mushroom and fungi walk in the Gatineau Hills. Keith is one of the world's leading experts on fungi, having spent over forty years studying them on five continents, both as a research academic and as the top scientist on the subject for Agriculture Canada. He is the p…
 
"Many people have said this was genocide. Justice Sinclair says it's genocide. The former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has called it genocide. So how do we investigate that? What are the patterns that we see from Residential School to Residential School in relation to the deaths of the children, and who do we hold accountable for that?" Kimbe…
 
"More Canadians saw Paul Henderson's winning goal with 34 seconds left in game eight than saw the moon landing three years earlier. And they watched the moon landing, it's not like they didn't care about it. I pointed this out to Wayne Gretzky, and he said, 'This was more important.'" -Author John U. Bacon - The Greatest Comeback Fifty years ago th…
 
"I was in a small place in Uganda called Fort Portal. We were going to leave that day when the army showed up looking for me, and my husband would just not let them take me. So they took him. It was awful, even now when I think about it. For years I had nightmares because there were two army men at his head with rifles and two pointing at his stoma…
 
We’re thrilled to have Michelle Valberg with us on the podcast, just after her appointment to the Order of Canada for her photography and philanthropy, and her work raising awareness about the beauty and fragility of Canada’s North. Her career as a photographer and explorer has spanned most parts of our globe and this great nation of ours. Her work…
 
“If the canoe is not on the Canadian flag, it is most certainly to be found in the Canadian imagination.” While Roy MacGregor wasn’t born in a canoe, growing up in and around Ontario’s Algonquin Park, he might as well have been. For as long as he can remember, he’s had a self-described love affair with the canoe and all it represents to this nation…
 
Now that we’re deep into summer paddling season, let's hop in a canoe with a genuine Canadian canoeing legend and ride some frothing, churning white water. As the founder of Blackfeather Wilderness Adventures, and Trailhead Outfitters, for more than 50 years, Wally Schaber has led trips down Canada’s most iconic rivers, many in the arctic, like the…
 
Geologist Dr Gordon "Oz" Osinsky joins us on the pod to talk about his fascinating expedition with two astronauts to the massive Kamestastin meteor crater in remote northern Labrador. With NASA and the world's space agencies preparing to return to the moon, Dr Oz is helping train potential lunar explorers on what they could find there. The 35 milli…
 
Trigger warning: This podcast contains discussions about the abuse of children and may not be appropriate for all listeners. “Who has been held accountable for the things that have been done to us? Nobody.” - a survivor of St Michael's Residential School Investigative journalist Connie Walker joins us on Explore to talk about her new Spotify podcas…
 
During the pandemic, it’s safe to say most of us spent some time self-isolating, but not quite in the way our guest today did. Polar explorer and RCGS Fellow Sunniva Sorby spent over a year and a half, including two long winters, in an uninsulated 1930 trapper’s hut on the Arctic island of Svalbard, which is halfway to the North Pole from northern …
 
Content warning: This episode contains descriptions of violence and abuse experienced by children. This episode is about the incredible journey of a group of new Canadians. Former child soldiers who fought in Sudan during Africa's bloodiest civil war were shipped off to Cuba and finally found refuge in Canada — many of them in Brooks, Alta. Our gue…
 
I'm thrilled to have Christian Stenner, one of Canada’s leading cave explorers and a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, as our guest on this episode of Explore. It's the International Year of Caves and Karst, which is why we wanted to have Christian on the podcast now. But given the mind boggling stories he has, the tight squeezes h…
 
We’re thrilled to have Ray Zahab back on the podcast. He was our very first guest back in 2019. Give that one a listen if you want a great overview of his amazing career as an extreme athlete and expedition leader travelling to some of the hottest, coldest, most remote parts of our planet. His latest expedition, a traverse of Ellesmere Island on fo…
 
When Moose Jaw, Sask. comedy duo “Leroy and Leroy” began posting their short video hot-takes on Instagram and TikTok in 2021, their hope was to get up to 10,000 followers. Just over a year later, their quirky videos highlighting the odd sites and signs found along Canada’s roadways now have hundreds of thousands of followers and over 12 million vie…
 
It’s always fun when one of our RCGS Explorers-in-Residence comes on the podcast; they’re always up to the most fascinating things. That’s especially true of Jill Heinerth. An internationally acclaimed cave diver, bestselling author, and award-winning documentary filmmaker, Jill has been spending the pandemic exploring Canada’s longest underwater c…
 
Severn Cullis-Suzuki, the new Executive Director of the David Suzuki Foundation, has been an environmental activist for almost as long as she can remember. That isn’t surprising when you consider that her father is David Suzuki, Canada’s leading environmentalist and longtime host of CBC’s much-loved show The Nature of Things. Cullis-Suzuki’s moment…
 
“To protect the Arctic is to protect the rest of the world.” So says Lisa Koperqualuk, Vice-President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, in this fascinating episode about the challenges faced by Inuit communities in the Arctic today. Koperqualuk discusses the impacts of climate change in the Arctic, the need to regulate Arctic shipping, the importan…
 
Musician and politician Charlie Angus is our guest this episode, talking about his new book, Cobalt: Cradle of the Demon Metals, Birth of a Mining Superpower. It is a fresh look at his Northern Ontario hometown of Cobalt and its silver mining boom in the early 1900s, which he says changed not only Canadian mining, but how mining has been carried ou…
 
Perry Bellegarde is the new Honorary President of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society — a ceremonial role previously held by the late Alex Trebek. You likely also know Bellegarde from his time as a transformational National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations from 2014 to 2021, where he helped push key legislation through Parliament, includi…
 
It’s hard to think of a person who has written with more passion about Canada, and in as many different mediums, as Dave Bidini. You might know him as the songwriter and frontman of the Rheostatics – that most Canadian of Canadian bands — or for his best-selling books On a Cold Road, The Tropic of Hockey, Keon and Me or Midnight Light, or from his …
 
Today we’re talking to Dr. Daniel Pauly, professor of marine biology at the University of British Columbia, the leading expert on the declining state of the world's fisheries and something of a philosopher. Fish is the last wild catch: the last animal food source we hunt and eat en masse from the wild. But Daniel Pauly warns that we are rapidly app…
 
With this December marking the 100th anniversary of Agnes Macphail becoming the first woman elected to the Canadian Parliament, Explore welcomes one of the most prominent female political figures of our present day to the podcast. Before stepping back from public life in the fall of 2021, Catherine McKenna was a federal Minister of Industry and Min…
 
We're thrilled to welcome Emily Choy, the newest RCGS Explorer-in-Residence, to the Explore Podcast. Based out of McGill University, Emily is an award-winning expert on the impacts of climate change on the Arctic, with a focus on a sea-bird called murres. Emily describes her summers on Coats Island in Hudson's Bay, studying a colony of 30,000 murre…
 
Viola Desmond was arrested 75 years ago this month for refusing to leave her seat in the “whites only” section of a movie theatre in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. This brave stand by a Black Nova Scotian against the segregation rules of the day in Nova Scotia would inspire future generations to break down the racist structures that had been suppressing…
 
The UN Climate Change Summit in Glasgow is being described as a critical moment in human history, as our ability to reverse global warming reaches a point of no return. Harvey Locke is in Glasgow, leading the charge against biodiversity loss, and linking it firmly to climate change. As a leader of the "Nature Needs Half" movement, Locke and a growi…
 
It's bird migration season. Geese are flying south, loons making their last mournful cries on northern lakes and bird feeders are getting set up in backyards and on balconies. To celebrate our avian friends, we’re thrilled to have Patrick Nadeau joining us. He is the new President of Birds Canada, which is the largest organization for citizen scien…
 
October ... The nights grow longer and darker. It's time for Hallowe'en, time to gather around fires and tell ghost stories. And that is exactly what RCGS Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts has in store for us in this episode. He joins us to talk about his new book, The Whisper on the Night Wind. It's a wilderness tale of the supernatural, an inves…
 
September 30, 2021 marks the first ever National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Canada. It's a federal statutory holiday, a time to reflect about the brutal impact of the Indian Residential School System. Hundreds of thousands of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children were forced to attend those institutions from the 1830s to the 1990s, and t…
 
Commander Chris Hadfield is arguably Canada’s most famous astronaut. There was even a time, during his 2013 mission aboard the International Space Station, when he was quite possibly our most famous Canadian, appearing as a guest on talk shows and capturing the imaginations of millions with his viral dispatches from life in orbit. A veteran of mult…
 
“Colombia is a place where magic seems to happen every moment and I would argue that only a people like the Colombians, with their enduring spirit of place, their indescribable capacity for joy, could have endured the agonies of the last 50 years.” Wade Davis says his latest book Magdalena: River of Dreams is a love letter of sorts. Colombia, he sa…
 
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