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Weekly podcast, British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics, available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you find your podcasts. Meet famous and infamous characters, walk with playwrights and peasants, and wander through castles and cathedrals. New episodes every Wednesday. Have a question about British history, something you’ve always wanted to know? Just ask! Let’s explore history together.
 
Food Historian, Seren Charrington-Hollins discusses the fascinating history of our food and drink.This podcast is for the gastronomically inquisitive and for those interested in either tasting the past or understanding how dishes and our diets have evolved over time. Every episode will have you leaving with at least one fascinating tidbit of information to whip out at your next dinner party or deliberate over for the day.Topics are far-ranging and include the British history of tea drinking, ...
 
Dr. Scott McLean, PhD Modern British history and MA in British medieval history, is the founding Director of Explore History. He began his academic career at the University of Guelph, Canada, before moving to England in 1999 to work at Queen’s University (Canada) Bader International Study Centre at Herstmonceux Castle. Teaching at the BISC offered the opportunity to not only meet some wonderful students and travel to historic sites, but teach a wide range of courses in British and European h ...
 
History! The most exciting and important things that have ever happened on the planet! Featuring reports from the weird and wonderful places around the world where history has been made and interviews with some of the best historians writing today. Dan also covers some of the major anniversaries as they pass by and explores the deep history behind today's headlines - giving you the context to understand what is going on today.
 
Welcome to British Food, a History: Lent. In his first podcast series, chef, food historian, scientist and blogger, Dr Neil Buttery charts the season of Lent. Over seven episodes, dropping each Sunday throughout Lent (starting 23/02/20), he'll be looking at the special days and customs that crop up over the 40-day fast, assessing it from every angle: the food, the social history, the anthropology and the science. Of course there's a healthy sprinkling of religion in there too. It's a podcast ...
 
Rab Houston was born in Hamilton, Scotland, lived in India and Ghana and was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and St Andrews University before spending six years at Cambridge University as a research student (Peterhouse) and research fellow (Clare College). He has worked at the University of St Andrews since 1983 and is Professor of Modern History, specialising in British social history. He is a fellow of both the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Edinburgh (Scotland’s natio ...
 
NAMM’s resident Music Historian Dan Del Fiorentino and co-hosts Michael Mullens, and Ashley Allison examine the innovative creations, evolution of musical instruments, the changing world of music retail, music industry icons, and other topics covered in NAMM’s Oral History program. The NAMM Oral History program boasts over 4,500 interviews and is continually growing. For more information about NAMM’s Oral History program please visit https://www.namm.org/library.
 
Travel back in time with me to some of the most fascinating moments in human history. Witness colossal sea battles involving tens of thousands of men, take part in pagan blood rituals in the mysterious forests of Northern Europe and engage in highly orchestrated tribal warfare within Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. All this and more from the comfort of your own living room/bus to work/toilet throne
 
In this podcast, Matthew Rothwell, author of Transpacific Revolutionaries: The Chinese Revolution in Latin America, explores the global history of ideas related to rebellion and revolution. The main focus of this podcast for the near future will be on the history of the Chinese Revolution, going all the way back to its roots in the initial Chinese reactions to British imperialism during the Opium War of 1839-1842, and then following the development of the revolution and many of the ideas tha ...
 
The early modern era describes the period in Europe and the Americas between 1450 and 1850. The Huntington collections are particularly strong in Renaissance exploration and cartography, English politics and law in the early modern era, the English aristocracy from the later Middle Ages through the 18th century, and 18th-century British and American military history. The USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute supports advanced research and scholarship on human societies of this era, s ...
 
Like heists, scams, and cons? I Can Steal That! is the true crime podcast that's never too heavy. Each episode tells the story of some of history's most outrageous heists, cons, and scams and the fascinating people behind them. Host Pete Stegemeyer breaks down the details of each case for a comedic guest and will change the way you look at banks, museums, and grifts.
 
This is volume 4 chapter 19 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay (1800-1859) in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key ...
 
This is volume 4 chapter 21 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay (1800-1859) in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key ...
 
This is volume 4 chapter 20 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay (1800-1859) in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key ...
 
War historian, writer, and broadcaster, James Rogers, presents this History Hit show about the most catastrophic wars in modern history. From the Seven Years War and the World Wars, to the Cold War and the War on Terror, this podcast opens up fascinating new perspectives on how conflict has shaped and changed our world. Each week, twice a week, James teams up with fellow historians, veterans, and experts to reveal astonishing new histories of ferocious global warfare, bloody revolutions, and ...
 
Reality TV is dismissed as guilty pleasure, low brow... even trash. But whether you want to admit it or not, you probably have heard of Snooki, Lisa Vanderpump or Kim Kardashian. Over the past 30 years, reality TV has become a place to see the social and political moment play out in real time -- from racial tensions on The Real World New York to gender dynamics on The Bachelor. On this season, join host Mariah Smith as she dissects the history of the genre one show at a time, revealing how i ...
 
TERROR OF THE ARCTIC- After receiving a distress signal from a dimensional void, The Doctor and Christine are lead to the 19th Century Arctic where they become involved in one of history's greatest unsolved mysteries. They soon discover a pair of British sailing vessels trapped in the ice. The crews are dying one by one despite the fact that the crewmen are healthy and have an abundance of supplies, shelter and food. The Doctor, perplexed by the unexplained deaths as well as the distress sig ...
 
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This week, we’ll be looking at six of the women who came to England and became game-changers: Emma of Normandy, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, Henrietta Maria of France, Mary of Modena, and Mary of Teck. In her own way, each of these women had an extraordinary and lasting impact on her son (or, in some cases, sons) and his rule. Emma’s p…
 
Tanmay Dhanania is an actor. He studied Nuclear Engineering at UC Berkeley and then trained as an actor at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He has acted in UK tv shows like New Tricks for the BBC, Indian Summers for Channel 4 and The Durrells in Corfu for itv. He has also acted in and produced independent films like Brahman Naman which premiered …
 
In the third episode of our series chronicling the history of British Prime Ministers we travel from one of the Most famous occupants of the office, Winston Churchill, right through to the current incumbent Boris Johnson and everyone in-between. For that Dan is joined by Iain Dale a well known broadcaster, podcaster, author and editor of the recent…
 
On 7th May 1915, the ocean liner RMS Lusitania was sunk by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland with more than half the passengers and crew being killed. Some of those lost were Americans and the sinking hardened opinion in the United States against Germany and marked the beginning of the process which led to the USA entering the First World Wa…
 
In 1942 the British launched a 12 man raid and reconnaissance mission to the Channel Island of Sark. On the night of the 3 October, a cast of characters who gave their colleague Ian Fleming ideas for a secret agent character, James Bond, crept ashore. They escaped hours later with one German prisoner, a further two having been killed in a scuffle. …
 
We know all about the battles of the Roman Empire: the opposing sides, their weapons and incentives. But if history is written by the winners, what happened if you lost? In this episode, Dr Jo Ball, battlefield archaeologist at the University of Liverpool, helps to fill in this gap. Jo takes us through the options of the victorious army; to release…
 
Elizabeth Chudleigh, Duchess of Kingston was a duchess who attracted scandal, a duchess who divided opinion, a duchess who refused to give up agency or accept her place in 18th-century society and she was loathed and loved in equal measure. Maid of honour to Augusta, Princess of Wales, for over 20 years and an important figure in Hanoverian court a…
 
Six years of exile on a remote island blighted with unpleasant weather conditions, in lodgings far inferior to those enjoyed whilst leader of France, hardly seems fitting for the final years of Napoleon Bonaparte. Yet, in this second episode with Zack White, we hear about how this remarkable military commander came to fall so far from the top. Zack…
 
How much can a burial really tell us about our ancient past? Professor Alice Roberts is today's guest and, as her new book Ancestors demonstrates, old bones can speak to us across the centuries. Using new ancient DNA analysis techniques archaeologists are now able to uncover an unprecedented level of detail about the lives of our ancestors. Where t…
 
Nazism was a horrific political ideology in the 1900s. But could the mania that destroyed Europe resemble a religion more than a political belief system? History for Thinkers is a show that brings history to life and makes it easy to understand. With documentaries, discussion, and depth. Hosted by Michael Macaulay. Become a Patron ► https://www.pat…
 
Getting to the moon was no easy feat, no matter how confident Kennedy may have sounded in his famous 1961 speech. NASA built a team from the ground up, and there were plenty of moments where it seemed as if they weren't going to make it. Fong tells stories of just how close they came, and how risky it was. After all, it was hard to feel safe when a…
 
MacArthur finishes up his escape from Corregidor to Melbourne Australia. But the news waiting for him is not the General’s liking, basically, there are more troops back on Bataan than there are in the whole of Australia. But Gen. George Marshall will sooth MacArthur’s wounded pride with The Medal of Honor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit po…
 
He is widely remembered as one of the most exceptional military commanders that the world has ever seen, a man whose influence was so pervasive that an entire era of European history is referred to in his name. Napoleon is just as divisive in death as he was in life, and for this first of two episodes with Zack White, we are discussing the rise of …
 
2021 marks 100 years since the creation of Northern Ireland. To discuss this, and the events that led up to the partition of Ireland, we were joined by Dr. Cormac Moore. Cormac is a historian in residence with Dublin City Council. His previous works include The GAA vs. Douglas Hyde, The Irish Soccer Split, and his most recent work, Birth of the Bor…
 
Take a deep dive into the remaking of the American Constitution and the 14th amendment created in the wake of the American Civil War. The 14th amendment formed a key part of addressing citizenship rights and equal protection under the law, particularly for former slaves. Comedian, writer and actor Larry Wilmore is executive producer and one of the …
 
In this episode, we saw that Muhammed has passed through the walls of Dahlala and Dahlor, and now is making his way to Brahmabad, but the departure Alafi has left Muhammed with a taste in his mouth https://www.patreon.com/join/mphistory Or https://www.paypal.me/mphpodcast For extra content go to https://www.muslimphistory.com/ Support the show (htt…
 
Did Hitler shoot himself in the Führerbunker, or did he slip past the Soviets and escape to South America? There have been innumerable documentaries, newspaper articles and Twitter threads written by conspiracy theorists to back up the case for escape. Luke Daly Groves has made it his mission to take on the conspiracy theorists, and smash their arg…
 
Captain Cook has been celebrated, wrongly, as the first European to discover Australia but many now believe it is time to reappraise his legacy particularly in light of the devastating effect it had on the native Aboriginal people of Australia. Professor John Maynard is a Worimi man and Director of Aboriginal History at The Wollotuka Institute. He …
 
Hitler’s invasion of the Soviet Union on Sunday 22 June 1941 was one of the bloodiest military campaigns mankind has ever known. Now, BAFTA winning producer and author Stewart Binns is telling the story of this catastrophic campaign from the perspective of the Soviet people. Listen as he and James explore the different perspectives on how Nazi Germ…
 
When thinking about the 16th century the Tudor dynasty often comes to the fore, but the was so much more to this extraordinary period to be explored. In celebration of the launch of her new History Hit podcast, Professor Suzannah Lipscombe joins Dan to discuss all things Not Just the Tudors. This new podcast will look right across the 16th century …
 
Join the History Time community:- Patreon// http://www.patreon.com/historytimeUK/ YouTube// https://www.youtube.com/historytime/ Facebook// https://www.facebook.com/HistoryTimeOfficial/ Twitter// https://twitter.com/HistoryTimeUK/ Instagram// https://www.instagram.com/historytime_ig/저자 History Time
 
The last major confrontation of the Second World War and the largest amphibious assault of the Pacific theatre, the Battle of Okinawa ended in Allied victory but with massive casualties on both sides. To take us through the battle James welcomed Saul David onto our sibling podcast Warfare. Saul is a professor of Military History at the University o…
 
Rogue scholar Dennis McCarthy has relied on plagiarism software, travels through Europe, and an obsession to find the truth to continue his quest for a new source of Shakespeare's plays. He concludes that Tudor courtier and author Thomas North, whose family was at the center of political intrigue for years, wrote plays that Shakespeare used as sour…
 
The Breguet No. 160 , more commonly known as "The Queen" or "The Marie-Antoinette" may be the world's most beautiful watch. Commissioned for the French Queen in 1783, the watch was so complex that it wasn't completed until 34 years after Marie Antoinette's death. In 1983, a master thief snuck into the L.A. Mayer Institute for Islamic Art and vanish…
 
In the dying days of the Second World War, a group of Georgians rose up against their German overlords on the Dutch island of Texel. Thousands of Georgians served in the Soviet forces during World War II and when captured and given the choice to “starve or fight”, some took up the German offer to don Wehrmacht uniforms. When the opportunity arose i…
 
1929 was, in a lot of ways, the year the world began its final descent into hell. The stock market crash in the United States would lead to untold misery in much of the Western world and allow for the rise and spread of particularly noxious ideologies across the whole of Europe. However, on the other side of the world, another "beginning of the end…
 
German unification in 1871 immediately altered the balance of power in Europe and across the world, but what did its existence and expansion in the 19th and early 20th-century really mean? Katja Hoyer joins Dan in this follow-up episode to The Second Reich which examined the formation of Germany. This time round Katja and Dan tackle the internal po…
 
On April 26th 1986 reactor No. 4 at the Chernobyl nuclear plant exploded sending a vast plume of radioactive material into the atmosphere, but what was it like for ordinary people nearby? It was the worst nuclear accident to that point in history and the catastrophic response to that meltdown and the mishandling of the messages around the accident …
 
The use of nerve agents is synonymous with Russian espionage for those of us who remember the recent poisonings of Alexei Navalny, Sergei and Yulia Skripal and the residents of Salisbury caught up in the latters’ attempted murders. The origins of this weapon, however, remain shrouded in mystery. Sergei Lebedev is a Russian novelist, currently based…
 
In this episode of Local History Matters Dr Claire Kennan meets Amy Hitchings and George Stokes from the Broken Futures project and Timothy Allsop from the Queer Rural Connections project. This episode explores these two fantastic initiatives are recovering the histories of queer rural people. For all of the links mentioned in the podcast please se…
 
Ben Ferencz at 102 years old is the last surviving prosecutor from the Nuremberg trials and a direct witness to the horrors of the Nazi death camps. Ben was born in Transylvania before emigrating to the United States with his family as a child to escape antisemitic persecution. He trained at Harvard Law School graduating in 1943 and served in the U…
 
Mao takes a critical position on the military line pursued by the Comintern and the Politburo. Also, the issue of scapegoating individuals as a way of dealing with repudiated party policies. Further reading: Marcia Ristaino, China’s Art of Revolution: The Mobilization of Discontent, 1927 and 1928 C. Martin Wilbur, The Nationalist Revolution in Chin…
 
It's time for MacArthur to leave Corregidor, but how? Submarine, plane or boat. MacArthur chooses an early departure over safety, thus he and his will suffer for 600 miles on a PT Boat. But the net around Corregidor is being drawn ever tighter by the Japanese. It's now or never. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices…
 
In this episode, Muhammed finally takes over Alor, but what is awaiting after the city has been taken from Queen Bai https://www.patreon.com/join/mphistory Or https://www.paypal.me/mphpodcast For extra content go to https://www.muslimphistory.com/ Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/mphistory)저자 Yahya
 
Benvenuto Cellini was the bad boy of the Renaissance! His life was a story of murders, violence, war, the sack of cities, sodomy, imprisonment, religious conversion, prodigious artistic talent and writing one of the greatest artistic autobiographies of all time. Jerry Brotton, Professor of Renaissance Studies at Queen Mary University of London, has…
 
Edible Flowers have a long and cherished history. In this episode, Seren touches on floriography before discussing how many traditional flowers found in the hedgerow and cottage garden have been prized throughout history for their edible qualities. Some flowers may have been cherished for health-giving properties, whilst others simply because they …
 
The attempt to create a new European Super League might have been short-lived with the attempt to form a breakaway competition collapsing in the face of widespread protests and denunciations from fans, but what led to this point? In this episode, Dan is joined by Jonathan Wilson of the Guardian Football Weekly and author of Inverting the Pyramid. J…
 
97 year old Jim Burrows OAM served as a Coastwatcher in the South Pacific during the Second World War. The Coastwatchers were an intelligence arm of the Allied Intelligence Bureau, and were set up to alert Australia of any military threat from the north. Jim was a radio operator, and spent 10 months in occupied Japanese territory. Over the last few…
 
In this archive episode, Dan visits the site of The Theatre, the 16th-century playhouse where some of Shakespeare's works were first performed, to investigate the archaeology with Heather Knight, Senior Archaeologist from the Museum of London Archaeology. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Join the Music History Project this week as we honor the amazing songwriter Hal David on what would have been his 100th birthday! Mr. David shares his story that began with him writing songs while serving during WWII. He then worked at the legendary Brill Building where he developed a partnership with Burt Bacharach and would write numerous hits in…
 
A plague which affects people from across society, the mass exodus from city centres and numerous opinions on how best to stay well ... all familiar to people today, but also to the people of the 2nd century AD. In this fascinating chat with Dr Nick Summerton, from our sibling podcast The Ancients, we explore the causes and effects of the Antonine …
 
We know London was very important to Shakespeare and his evolution from life in Stratford in the 1580s when he married and had children to the early 1600s when his company became the favored actors of the King and he dressed in the King’s livery. Shakespeare’s London was a place where fortunes were made and lost, where reputations were forged and d…
 
In this episode from the archives, Dan sits down with James Holland to talk about Operation Argument. Taking place in February 1944, this was the biggest air battle of World War Two, and part of the US Army Air Force and RAF strategic bombing campaign against Nazi Germany. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
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