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Learning your history makes you - and your people - stronger. As Black people, we know we’re left out of the history books. That the media images are skewed. That we need access to experts, information and ideas so we can advance our people. Black History Year connects you to the history, thinkers, and activists that are left out of the mainstream conversations. You may not agree with everything you hear, but we’re always working toward one goal: uniting for the best interest of Black people ...
 
Welcome to Everyday Black History! Where we highlight the contributions of Black Men and Women both Past and present. Here we celebrate Afro Appreciation, where Black American, Africans and Latinos of African descent are honored. We also highlight Institutions that have help the advancement of people in the African Diaspora, such as historically Black University and many others. Enjoy Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/EverydayBlackHistory/support
 
Our goal is simple—educate white people on black history. The highest calling of humanity is to love. Whether you know it or not, the racial disparities in our country hurt us. They train us to protect our advantages rather than love others, and that mentality reduces us. New episodes will be released on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month. Visit us at blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com + for bonus content and the ability to vote for future topics, support us on Patreon at patreon.com/black ...
 
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Black History Matters 365

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Black History Matters 365

BHM365 is a weekly podcast series hosted by Jo Scaife a Marketplace Entrepreneur

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BHM365 is a weekly podcast series that explores the true account of African American History as American History. Hosted by author and marketplace entrepreneur Jo Anne Scaife, this podcast dives into the revolutionary research found in “Black History 365: An Inclusive Account of American History” a seminal work by Dr. Walter Milton, Jr. and Dr. Joel Freeman. Featuring weekly interviews with history makers and current influencers, special ‘round table’ talks and series, as well as community f ...
 
GirlTrek's epic 21-day walking meditation series to remember where we came from and to gather strength for the road ahead. We celebrate Black stories and the lessons of our ancestors to help guide us through these uncertain times. Each episode, is a conversation on learning, living and elevating to our highest self with guidance from lessons of the past. Hosted by GirlTrek Co-founders Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison. Produced by: Ebony Andrews
 
Black History Mini Docs expands it social media and website content with the BHMD Podcast series. In 2013 award winning and legendary producer/director Neema Barnette and her husband filmmaker/actor, Reed R. McCants launched Black History Mini Docs and have been offering their mini history lessons for 8 consecutive years on all social media platforms. The podcast is hosted by Whole Body Literacy & Education (WHBLE) founder Ah-Keisha McCants and featuring special guest host as well. BHMD Podc ...
 
"This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture" is a weekly podcast produced by the Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU) an interracial group of faculty at Monmouth University concerned about issues pertaining to the Black/African American experience. BADFU members will periodically interview scholars, authors, activists, and community leaders on matters related to the history, society, and culture of Black and African American communities in the United States (U.S.) and beyond ...
 
It’s fast, accurate U.S. history available in free video podcast recordings describing major historical events and introducing less well-known experiences involving Black Americans. The series received two Webby Awards in May 2020: A People’s Choice award for the Best Podcast: Documentary as well for the Best Video Series: Education & Discovery and two more Webby Awards in May 2021 as selected by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences again as the Best Podcast: Documentary an ...
 
The Black History Buff podcast is a fun and thrilling journey through time. Covering the full historical tapestry of the African Diaspora, you’ll hear tales covering everything from African Samurai to pistol-wielding poets. More than just a podcast, the show is a bridge that links communities throughout the African diaspora and enlightens and empowers its friends. If you'd like to become a friend of the show follow the links on this page https://pod.fan/black-history-buff-podcast You can fin ...
 
The African diaspora is a rich tapestry weaving through the course of time, with not only a strong impact on the American society, but throughout the world. The “Black History” podcast ventures to each week introduce an innovative topic, influential person or present interesting aspects of history related to the African diaspora to those seeking knowledge and enlightenment.
 
Black History is more than the common names we always hear. Each Friday, join Shaakira White, an HBCU grad and content creator, as she recounts the stories of those forgotten in Black History. If you want to learn more about Black history, are curious about all things Black, or just want to hear a great narrative, this is the podcast for you. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blackhistorymoments/support
 
African-Americans have been mis-educated about their history. Many believe black history begins with slavery. The history of African-Americans is a proud complex mixture of pain and progress. Brittany Wilkins, engineer and herstorian takes the journey to return, not just to a land, but to a lost heritage of rich accomplishments. Can you picture a time where Africans influenced the world in developing civilizations in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics? If you want ...
 
Meet BlackFacts.com, the Internet's longest running Black History Encyclopedia - Delivering Black History, Culture, Vides and News to our followers. This podcast series provides your daily Black Facts Of The Day™. In addition there will be occasion bonus episodes focused on diversity or other key topics of interest to our BlackFacts audience Learn black history, Teach black history - https://blackfacts.com
 
A comprehensive podcast on black history and black issues around the world. You’ll hear about subjects in black history that you won’t find in your average history curriculum. Each story is told in an entertaining narrative fashion that’s easy to listen to. I used to get bored in history class too. But black history is far from boring. The rich tapestry of experience that makes up the diaspora deserves its attention and that’s the mission of this podcast: bringing black history from around t ...
 
Black Lives News BLC - Black History Podcast and LecturesLectures By The Best Black Authors In Audio Format To Download. All Authors Wrote Stories From Their REAL Life, Not Fiction.please support with 2$ or 8$ per month we try to stay alive and pay for the content to remain online👉🏾 https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=4MULNCT3RAC9E&source=urlSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/black-authors-audiobooks/support
 
A series of narrations from documents, speeches, and analyses of legislation that relate to the progression of events memorialized during the Black History Month observance at First United Methodist Church of Pasadena, CA. More of the content relating to the event can be found at "In Honor of Black History Month" at http://forums.delphiforums.com/entrances/messages/4286/1 Episode 1 is a narrated excerpt of Benjamin Bannecker's letter to Thomas Jefferson in which Bannecker urges Jefferson to ...
 
During the month of February, BRTW ensemble members are selecting personal Black heroes to highlight everyday. These heroes may have spoken the magic words that first made them see their Black beauty, the people who inspired them to become artists, or even the person who taught them how to make proper mixed greens. find us on: twitter and instagram: @thebrtw facebook: @Black Revolutionary Theatre Workshop and at our website: blackrevolutionarytheaterworkshop.org
 
This series of podcasts explores themes and highlights from the exhibition Black Greenwich Pensioners (1 Oct 2020 - 21 Feb 2021) at the Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich. In each episode, Claire Kirk (Head of Learning, Interpretation and Collections at the Old Royal Naval College), speaks to maritime historian and Black history expert, S.I. Martin, who curated the exhibition. Conversations delve into the research behind the display and what this research tells us about the lives of Black ma ...
 
History isn't black and white, yet too often it's presented as such. Grey History is a podcast dedicated to retelling great historical events, but in a way that highlights contradiction, dissent and contrasting conclusions. Why? Because it's in the grey that history has its beauty, its intrigue, and most importantly its lessons. Current Season: The French Revolution - Tyrants and Terrorists
 
Having long been in this region, Black Appalachians remain mostly invisible, while the dominant narratives of Appalachia depict an overwhelming, white cultural homogeneity. The Black in Appalachia Podcast challenges these misconceptions by highlighting how Black families have shaped and have been shaped by the region. Through historical and contemporary stories of people, places and experiences, hosts Enkeshi El-Amin and Angela Dennis interrogate what it means to be Black in Appalachia, crea ...
 
Hollywood and Crime is a ground-breaking true crime series about the most infamous murders in Tinseltown history. In The Black Dahlia Serial Killers, host Tracy Pattin investigates the sensational unsolved murder of Elizabeth Short. Known as the Black Dahlia, Short was a star-struck young woman whose body was found completely severed at the waist in January 1947. Many remember her tragic story, yet few know that more than a dozen other women died in similar circumstances around that same time.
 
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The Black Athlete

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The Black Athlete

Louis Moore and Derrick White

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This is a podcast by Louis Moore and Derrick White. As trained historians and leading scholars on sports and race, we discuss the history of the black athlete in a contemporary conversation. Moore is the author of I Fight for a Living: Boxing and the Battle for Black Manhood, and also We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, The Black Athlete, and the Quest for Equality. White is the author of The Challenge of Blackness: The Institute of the Black World and Political Activism in the 1 ...
 
Join The Gist of Freedom weekly live online discussion is a celebration of the African American experience—honoring all the people, past and present, black and white—who have determined to preserve history in literature, craftsmanship and artifact.
 
Zaron Burnett’s dad didn’t want slavery to be his son’s only image of Black people in American history. So every night, he filled Zaron’s dreams with these incredible stories of Black cowboys. Despite what Hollywood taught us, one-in-four cowboys were Black. Their stories tell a bigger, braver, more honest history of America.
 
The church and religion has played and continues to play a big role in the African-American community. Yet, many of us who grew up in the traditional black church do not have an understanding of how our faith evolved under the duress of slavery and discrimination to be and to represent what it does today. The purpose of this broadcast is to provide that background knowledge while also pointing out the dividing line between what is just tradition and true faith in Jesus Christ.
 
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show series
 
What can southern Black joy teach us about agency? What role does refusal have in liberation? What more might there be to root work than resistance? In The Politics of Black Joy: Zora Neale Hurston and Neo-Abolitionism (Northwestern UP, 2021), Lindsey Stewart explores Hurston’s contributions to political theory and philosophy of race to develop a p…
 
We continue our series on Mass Incareration. Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2020 The New Jim Crow (Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness) Serial Season 3 EJI: Criminal Justice Reform For access to a private Facebook group, bonus content, full interviews, and the ability to vote for future topics, $5/month supports us at patreon.com/bla…
 
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Black soldiers have been an instrumental part of the armed forces since the Civil War. They put their lives on their line for their country and entered war to protect the very land that didn’t promise to protect them. Despite experiencing inferior treatment while in combat, Black soldiers took t…
 
Sarah Goode was being a slave but went on to become and entrepreneur and inventor. She invented the folding bed and received a patent in 1885. Check out the episode for more details. Enjoy --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/EverydayBlackHistory/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/EverydayBlackHistory/support…
 
P. Gabrielle Foreman and Jim Casey's edited volume The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century (UNC Press, 2021) is the first to focus on the Colored Conventions movement, the nineteenth century's longest campaign for Black civil rights. Well before the founding of the NAACP and other twentieth-century pillars of th…
 
Black women don’t often get their roses in the history books, relegated instead into background roles. But for us to achieve liberation as a people, we must understand the need for collective action to achieve liberation. Dr. Ashley Farmer can attest to this need. An accomplished historian and author of the pioneering book “Remaking Black Power: Ho…
 
Sunday Memoirs Preachers from the Past: Civil War Preachers James W, C, Pennington (First Black Student at Yale University-1930s) American Minister, Anti-Slavery Orator, and Civil Rights Activist A reading from BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History textbook on the Black Church. Sunday Memoirs takes a look back in the past to find inspirat…
 
In this episode, Dr. Katie Parkin discusses Pushing Cool with Dr. Keith A. Wailoo. Parkin is a Professor of History at Monmouth University and the Jules Plangere, Jr., Endowed Chair in American Social History. She is the author of Food is Love: Advertising and Gender Roles in Modern America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005) and Women at the …
 
Professor Sinha, Black History University 1. Christopher Columbus; Commemorate 17th Century Black abolitionist De Silva Mendoca 2. Cori Bush Protest Homelessness Abolitionist 3. Congressman Quincy Adams, anti-slavery abolitionists, gag rule 4. President Obama's Presidential Library Grounding Breaking, Chicago Founder, Jean Baptiste Pointe DaSable 5…
 
An explanation the life and death of Fred Hampton. Hampton was a young, gifted leader with a talent for organizing people who would rise to become the chairman of the Black Panther Party’s Illinois chapter before being assassinated by the federal government. Audio Onemichistory.com Please support our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=25697914…
 
Professor Adrienne Jones holds the honor of being the first Black woman to achieve tenured professor status at Pratt Institute. Jones has taught in the Fashion Design department at Pratt for over 25 years. In 2014, Professor Jones conceived and co-curated the landmark exhibition Black Dress, which honors Black designers and addresses the lack of di…
 
This episode of Neema Barnette presents BHMD Podcast is hosted by Actress/Director/Producer Bonita Brisker. Her guest is Manager/Producer/Director Franklin Lett. He was the husband of the late legendary Singer/Actress @DellaReese. Watch a live video preview of this podcast on Facebook and the full episode blackhistoryminidocs.com…
 
What’s a “progressive?” We hear constantly about the rift in the Democratic Party between its “progressive” wing and its “moderate” one. But what exactly was “Progressivism?” And why do we hear the word “progressive” but not much about “Progressivism?” The answer may lie in the fact that modern day progressive Democrats or those who ally with them …
 
All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature (Cornell UP, 2021) explores how Russian writers from the mid-1920s on have read and responded to Joyce's work. Through contextually rich close readings, José Vergara uncovers the many roles Joyce has occupied in Russia over the last century, demonstrating how the writers Yury Olesha,…
 
Did the United States really “bail the French out in two world wars,” or is it a blustering, bigoted myth? Professor Phil Nash joins us to discuss what actually happened in World Wars I and II, and whether the United States was “bailing out” the French or repaying a major debt from the American Revolution. Join us as we discuss all the issues. Lafa…
 
One of the fifty most influential living philosophers, a “self-promoting charlatan” (Brian Leiter), and the orchestrator of an “online orgy of stupidity” (Ray Brassier). In Skirmishes: With Friends, Enemies, and Neutrals (Punctum Books, 2020), Graham Harman responds with flair and wit to some of his best-known critics and fellow travelers. Pulling …
 
Rebirth of the English Comic Strip: A Kaleidoscope, 1847-1870 (UP of Mississippi, 2021) enters deep into an era of comic history that has been entirely neglected. This buried cache of mid-Victorian graphic humor is marvelously rich in pictorial narratives of all kinds. Author David Kunzle calls this period a "rebirth" because of the preceding long …
 
Mozina’s Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today’s south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in centra…
 
For more than half of its existence, members of the Marine Corps largely self-identified as soldiers. It did not yet mean something distinct to be a Marine, either to themselves or to the public at large. As neither a land-based organization like the Army nor an entirely sea-based one like the Navy, the Corps' missions overlapped with both institut…
 
Told in personal interviews, A Punkhouse in the Deep South: The Oral History of 309 (University Press of Florida, 2021) is the collective story of a punk community in an unlikely town and region, a hub of radical counterculture that drew artists and musicians from throughout the conservative South and earned national renown. The house at 309 6th Av…
 
On This Day In History The Black Power Salute of 1968 Tommie Smith and John Carlos It was a move that drew international attention and controversy when Tommie Smith and John Carlos lifted their fists to give the Black Power salute during the national anthem at the medal ceremony in the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. The move sparked…
 
Moment In History Oprah G. Winfrey A reading from the book: BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History Queen of All Media Winfrey is an American media executive - chairwoman and CEO of Harpo Productions; Chairwoman, CEO and CCO of the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN); and co-founder of the women's cable television network Oxygen (2002-2006). She ha…
 
In this episode I chatted with Leslie Barnes and Joseph Mai, two scholars of film, about their new anthology The Cinema of Rithy Panh: Everything Has a Soul out with Rutgers University Press, 2021. As a child Rithy Panh survived the Khmer Rouge regime yet lost his immediate family during those awful years. He was fortunate enough to emigrate to Fra…
 
Rabbi Judah the Prince transformed the Mishnah into a text, and now Dov Zakheim, culling from a fascinating array of sources, has brought to life the story and historical times of Judah the Prince, offering us a portrait of one of the seminal figures of early Judaism. Join us as we talk with Dov Zakheim about his recent work, The Prince and The Emp…
 
Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O’Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O’Neill’s path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant’s philosoph…
 
In Mexico environmental struggles have been fought since the nineteenth century in such places as Zacatecas, where United States and European mining interests have come into open conflict with rural and city residents over water access, environmental health concerns, and disease compensation. In Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs: Mining, Water, and Public …
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
The massacre of student protestors at Thammasat University on 6 October 1976 is one of the most infamous incidents in modern Thai political history. It is also among the most problematic for historians, who have struggled with the silences and ambiguities enveloping events of that day, not to mention survivors and families of the victims, who have …
 
The story of the American newsroom is that of modern American journalism. In The American Newsroom: A History, 1920-1960 (University of Missouri Press, 2021), Will Mari documents a time of great change and controversy in the field, one in which journalism was produced in "news factories" by news workers with dozens of different roles, and not just …
 
The Hasidic community in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is famously one of the most separatist, intensely religious, and politically savvy groups of people in the entire United States. Less known is how the community survived in one of the toughest parts of New York City during an era of steep decline, only to later resist and also participat…
 
A century ago, it was a given that a woman with a college degree had to choose between having a career and a family. Today, there are more female college graduates than ever before, and more women want to have a career and family, yet challenges persist at work and at home. This book traces how generations of women have responded to the problem of …
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
Between 1865 and 1900, the population of Los Angeles grew from around 5,000 people to over 100,000. With population growth that explosive came the opportunity for vast riches to be made. In Imperial Metropolis: Los Angeles, Mexico, and the Borderlands of American Empire, 1865–1941 (UNC Press, 2019), Dr. Jessica Kim, an associate professor of histor…
 
Dr. Erica R. Edwards's The Other Side of Terror: Black Women and the Culture of US Empire (New York University, 2021) reveals the troubling intimacy between Black women and the making of US global power. The year 1968 marked both the height of the worldwide Black liberation struggle and a turning point for the global reach of American power, which …
 
To call the hundred years that straddle the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries as a radical period of change for China is an understatement, moving from the Imperial period, through the Republican era, and ending in the rise of the PRC. Dr. Elizabeth LaCouture’s Dwelling in the World: Family, House, and Home in Tianjin, China, 1860–1960, published…
 
With Imperial Nostalgia: How the British Conquered Themselves (Manchester UP, 2020) Peter Mitchell offers a “history of the present”. That is to say, it is not a narrative of how we got to where we are, but rather a sustained reflection on how history shapes and interacts with our current world. Mitchell also engages the uses history for contempora…
 
Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Sov…
 
The discussion of factions in American politics is as old as the republic itself. But there is more to consider, particularly in terms of the way that contemporary factions operate within our current political landscape. Political Scientist Rachel Blum, in her new book, How The How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Poli…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
Amman, the capital of Jordan, contends with a crisis of identity rooted in how it grew to become a symbol for the Anglo-Hashemite government first, and a city second. As a representation of the new centralized authority, Amman became the seat of the Mandatory government that orchestrated the development of Transjordan, the British protectorate esta…
 
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