Ancient Greece 공개
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A podcast about the history of ancient Greece for people new to and familiar with Ancient Greek history.The Casting Through Ancient Greece podcast will focus on telling the story of Ancient Greece starting from the pre history through Archaic Greece, Classical Greece and up to the Hellenistic period. Featured throughout the podcast series will be Major events such as the Greek and Persian wars, The Peloponnesian war and Alexander the Greats war against Persia. www.castingthroughancientgreece ...
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The History of Ancient Greece Podcast is a deep-dive into one of the most influential and fundamental civilization in world history. Hosted by philhellene Ryan Stitt, THOAG spans over two millennia. From the Bronze Age to the Archaic Period, from Classical Greece to the Hellenistic kingdoms, and finally to the Roman conquest, this podcast will tell the history of a fundamental civilization by bringing to life the fascinating stories of all the ancient sources and scholarly interpretations of ...
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The podcast that transports you to the ancient world and back, with some good conversation along the way. It's not just about ancient Greece. It's about a huge chunk of human history that the Greek texts give us access to: from Egypt and Babylon, to Persia, to Carthage and Rome, we'll sail the wine-dark sea of history with some expert guides at the helm. Topics will include archaeology, literature, and philosophy. New episode every month.
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A podcast by the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama. In each episode, the APGRD invites academics and/or creative practitioners (directors, playwrights, actors, choreographers etc.) to talk to us about their research, archival discoveries, and creative practices. We often begin with an object from our archive to start a wider conversation. The podcast runs during the university's vacations.
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This subject deals with the cultural history of the ancient Greek world through both textual sources and the material evidence of art and archaeology. The period covered runs from the Iron Age world of Archaic Greece through to the late Classical period (roughly from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE). We will concentrate mainly on Athens and mainland Greece, but we will also focus on the Greek expansion into other parts of the Mediterranean world (Sicily and South Italy) in the process ...
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In this episode, we discuss Spartan imperial policy at home and abroad in the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War at Sparta from 404-396 BC, including their war with Elis, the imperial ambitions of Lysander and the ascension of Agesilaos, Kinadon's foiled socio-political revolution, and Sparta's invasion of Persia to "free" the Eastern Greeks Show N…
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Prepare to be transported to a Sicily that's both ancient and alive, where democracy's roots intertwine with the whispers of tyrants. On our historical odyssey, we'll traverse the landscapes of power, betrayal, and the unending quest for dominion. I promise an expedition into the heart of Sicilian intrigue, from the liberation of Syracuse to the th…
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This is a teaser of the bonus episode, Miltiades found over on Patreon. Travel back in time to fifth century BC Athens, where the life of Miltiades—a man whose lineage was synonymous with both nobility and concern—takes center stage. From the influence of his uncle, Miltiades the Elder, to the Olympic chariot racing triumphs of his family, we explo…
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Uncover the chilling drama of ancient conflict as we journey through the shadows of the Peloponnesian War—revealing the political chaos of Corcyra, and the tragedy of Plataea. This episode uncovers the tales of rebellion, siege, and the sobering reality of political strife, all through the compelling lens of Thucydides' historical narratives. Be pr…
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Bret Devereux is a military historian at North Carolina State University and author of the recent viral article "Spartans Were Losers: The US Military's Admiration of a Proto-Fascist City-State is Based on Bad History." He joins us to explain why he thinks that the traditional image of Sparta as an egalitarian society of warrior badasses is a lie. …
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Embark on a historical odyssey with us as we temporarily halt our regular series for a well-deserved January respite. However, the annals of ancient Greek history remain open with an exclusive miniseries treat—a deep exploration of the enigmatic Battle of Marathon. Journey back to 490 BC and unravel the mysteries of this legendary conflict through …
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Are you ready to cross the threshold of time and enter the world of Ancient Greece during the tumultuous political shifts post-Pericles' rule? I invite you to join us on this journey, where we scrutinize the uprising on Lesbos and its profound implications on Spartan maneuvers and Athens' retaliation. As power vacuums arise in Athens, new intriguin…
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Have you ever been curious about an unsolved mystery from the past? Well, I, Mark, invite you on a thrilling journey to uncover the secrets of the Battle of Marathon in this exclusive bonus feature on Patreon. We're shifting our focus to the Greeks' tactical approach on the battlefield and raising thought-provoking questions about the Persian caval…
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Are you ready to travel back in time and unravel the mysteries of ancient Greek philosophy with me, Mark Selleck, and our distinguished guest, Jack Visnjic, or as you might know him, Lantern Jack, is renowned for his profound knowledge in this philosophical domain. With a PhD in Ancient Philosophy from Princeton University, Jack brings an understan…
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In our return to the tumultuous third year of the war, the Chalcidice comes back into focus once more with renewed operations. The siege of Potidaea may have found resolution in the previous year, but with lingering hostility in the Chalcidice, Athens is forced to act. A fresh operation aims to secure Athens' base in Potidaea, a move designed to so…
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Join us as we take you on an exploration of the fascinating world of the ancient Spartans. With Professor Paul Cartledge, a leading historian on the Spartans, as our guide, we will demystify the intriguing tales, values, and societal structure of this resilient warrior society. We'll wade through the Spartan mirage, unveiling the unique education s…
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Embark on a riveting exploration of ancient Greece as we delve into the tumultuous events surrounding Pericles, a towering political figure who shaped the destiny of the city-state for nearly four decades. Follow the gripping narrative of Athens' struggle during the siege of Potidaea, where Pericles' efforts faced unexpected challenges, leading to …
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Tad Crawford's Website Buy On Wine-Dark Seas Explore the literary world of Tad Crawford, acclaimed author of "A Floating Life: A Novel," "The Secret Life of Money," and numerous nonfiction books. With a National Endowment for the Arts award to his name, Crawford is also the founder and publisher of Allworth Press, residing in vibrant New York City.…
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Step back in time once again to the second year of the Peloponnesian War and immerse yourself in the heart of ancient Athens, a city grappling with a devastating plague. But in this intriguing narrative, our journey takes a unique twist, leading us northward to the Chalcidice, where Athens has dispatched additional forces to besiege Potidaea. Along…
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In the second year of the Peloponnesian War, the stage was set for a continuation of the struggle between Sparta and Athens. Archidamus, the Spartan commander, spearheaded an invasion of Attica with renewed fervour, while Athens harnessed its maritime might to direct a potent fleet towards a more expansive target on the Peloponnesian shores. Yet, a…
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In this fascinating interview, I have the privilege of sitting down with Prof. Yvonne Korshak, a distinguished historian and accomplished writer, to delve into the captivating world of her latest masterpiece, “Pericles and Aspasia.” This remarkable work of Historical fiction shines a brilliant light on the period preceding the Peloponnesian War in …
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As our world becomes increasingly hi-tech, more and more people have been turning to ancient wisdom traditions in search of meaning. There are two schools of ancient philosophy in particular that have seen a meteoric revival in recent years: Platonism and Stoicism. Cognitive scientist John Vervaeke joins us to explore why this is happening. -------…
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The end of the first campaigning season of the Peloponnesian war had now drawn to a close. Sparta had invaded Attica with their offensive strategy, while Athens resisted with the defensive policy employed by Pericles. Athens had also launched naval operations which would harass the Peloponnese and secure Athens defensive position even further. Howe…
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The first year of the Peloponnesian war is now upon us. The first phase of this nearly 30-year struggle would be known as the Archidamian War, named after the Spartan king Archidamus, who had tried to prevent war developing in the first place. Archidamus being the only available Spartan king, the other not yet of age, would find himself leading the…
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AGD is going back to Greece this fall (Oct. 11-19) for another epic adventure! This time we'll be exploring areas that in ancient times lay in the shadow of – or in direct conflict with – the Athenian hegemony. Check out our video from the first tour: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1g-w7u6aQz0 To reserve your spot, email us at greecepodcast@gmail.…
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We have now reached the outbreak of the Peloponnesian war, where we saw the hostilities between Thebes and Plataea marking a point where the war would begin. Both of these city states were allied to Sparta, in Thebes case and Athens on the Plataean side. Even though preparations for war were underway already, this action would see that both Sparta …
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The war party within Sparta now had the majority in favour of their policy towards Athens. A clear vote had seen that the policies of the peace that had influenced much of Spartan policy since the end of the Persian invasions had now fallen out of favour. This would see that Sparta now saw that Athens had breached the 30 years peace, created nearly…
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A podcast with Leo Aylen and David Wiles Leo Aylen, a poet, author, actor, director, broadcaster, and screenwriter, has engaged significantly with classical material over the course of his career. In this podcast episode, he discusses his sell-out production of 'Antigone' at the Greenwich Theatre. His interlocutor is David Wiles, Emeritus Professor…
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This is a teaser of the bonus episode, Persian Counter Attack found over on Patreon. After having looked at the reasons for the Ionian revolt breaking out, we now turn to the revolt itself. In the main series we had focused on the revolt in general with a large focus on the Greeks operations. This time around we take a closer look at the Persian re…
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With Potidaea now under siege from Athens, Corinth, although unofficial involved, was looking to help save the city and their connection to it before it would fall. To do this, they would work with the surrounding cities on the Chalcidids to mount raids on the Athenians to help relive pressure on the city. However, their primary goal was to try and…
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Athens support of Corcyra had seen hostilities once again develop with Corinth who had been engaged in a dispute with the island polis. Athens would send ships to support Corcyra, as the Corinthian set sail to impose their will. Out of this affair would see the battle of Sybota take place and with it the first engagement seeing Athenian and Corinth…
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Athens had now taken the decision to send aide to Corcyra after having swayed from one side of the argument to the other. However, the assistance would be limited, with it being defensive in nature. Athens would send a small force of 10 triremes to Corcyra to lend their support with the commanders being instructed they were to only engage the Corin…
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The analogy of a powder keg in historical events it often used to describe a volatile situation that is waiting to explode into something larger. The most famous example of this is the events leading up to the breakout of World War 1. A seemingly remote region in the Balkans would see an act of violence take place that would end up embroiling all t…
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Athens had extinguished another fire in the Aegean when the island of Samos and Miletus, both Delian League members had gone to war with each other. Athens would assist Miletus seeing Samos revolt, though after a couple years Samos was back in the league. However, this had highlighted weaknesses in Athens control around its empire as other areas ha…
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Links: https://www.odysseus-unbound.org/ Faceook YouTube Book: Odysseus Unbound: The Search for Homer's Ithaca In the series we have look at some elements within Greek history that have connections to traditional tales and mythology. Some big examples of these were when we looked at the Trojan War, Mycenae and the Minoans. Well once again we are lo…
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We continue our look at the development of Corinth in the series. Last episode we ended with the period of tyranny that had lasted two generations and ended with the assassination of the third. However, Corinth would continue to flourish, with cultural and economic advances taking place. Corinth would end up hosting one of the Pan Hellenic games, b…
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The polis of Corinth has remained in the background of events as we have travelled through the narrative of the series so far. Now though, we have reached a point, the years leading to the break out of the Peloponnesian War, where Corinth starts to feature in the ancient sources on a more regular basis. This would be through diplomatic dealings, bo…
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Athens and Sparta had now entered into an agreement known as the 30 years’ peace, seeing the first Peloponnesian come to an end. This would see the creation of two spheres of influence within Greek lands that they would now turn their attention to. In Athens, Pericles would now also see a challenge to his influence within the Athenian political sys…
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In this episode, we discuss the life, influences, drawbacks, and positives of the Athenian military leader, philosopher, and historian--Xenophon (ca. 430-354 BC)--who was one of Sokrates' more famous pupils; and the post-Peloponnesian war Panhellenic campaign into the heart of the Persian Empire that he made famous through his writings (the Anabasi…
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So, it’s now mid-December and I am taking a break over the Christmas period and month of January. Though, before signing off for the holidays I wanted to leave you all with a different sort of episode to see out the year. I decided to contact my good friend Steve over at The Spartan History Podcast to see if he would be interested in coming on just…
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Athens and Sparta were now in a position to turn their attention to matters within their own spheres of influence, with the truce that existed between them. Sparta would look at eliminating the threats that they had faced on the Peloponnese, seeing Argos now at peace with Sparta, and Tegea brought back into the Peloponnesian league. While negotiati…
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This time we're taking a little break from Greece to explore the broader history of democracy. Was democracy really a Greek invention? Historian David Stasavage, author of The Decline and Rise of Democracy, thinks it was not. And in today's episode he explains why. --------------- Support Ancient Greece Declassified on Patreon: patreon.com/greecepo…
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After the battle of Tanagra, Athens was able to focus on pursuing its aims throughout Boeotia, the Gulf of Corinth and the Peloponnese. This saw Athens power and influence grow even more at the expense of Sparta and its allies. However, the disaster that would take place in Egypt for Athens would see them now needing to change their policies to bet…
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Polybius' theory of anacyclosis is the most sophisticated theory of political (r)evolution to have emerged from ancient Greek and Roman political thought. ------------------ To watch the highlight real from the last AGD tour in Greece, click here. ------------------ To read the passage in Polybius where he discusses anacyclosis click here. --------…
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Sparta had defeated Athens at the battle of Tanagra in 457 BC, though both armies had taken heavy losses. Both would look to make a temporary truce so that they could regroup without the fear of being attacked while in a vulnerable position. This would see the forces of both Athens and Sparta return to their cities bringing a close to this campaign…
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Athens was engaging in developing new alliances on the Greek mainland in response to the hostility with Sparta. This would also see a number of campaigns launched by the Athenians to establish their security, these being fought by Sparta’s allies. However, as these events on the mainland were unfolding, a plea for help from a rebel king in Egypt wo…
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