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Few literary terms are more hotly debated, discounted, or derided than the "Great American Novel." But while critics routinely dismiss the phrase as at best hype and as at worst exclusionary, the belief that a national literature commensurate with both the scope and the contradictions of being American persists. In this podcast Scott Yarbrough and Kirk Curnutt examine totemic works such as Herman Melville's Moby-Dick and Toni Morrison's Beloved that have been labeled GANs, exploring their th ...
 
Kann man Großbritannien durch den Reichtum an lyrischer Poesie verstehen? The Poetry Pod geht in seiner ersten Staffel „Britain through the Bards“ auf die Forschungsreise: Sechs spannende Episoden in englischer Sprache mit inspirierender Lyrik, spannenden Interviews und jeder Menge literarischer Überraschungen! Can Britain really be understood through its rich poetic heritage? The Poetry Pod sets off on a journey of discovery in its first series „ Britain through the Bards“: 6 episodes cramm ...
 
In which the CenterForLit staff embarks on a quest to discover the Great Ideas of literature in books of every description: ancient classics to fresh bestsellers; epic poems to bedtime stories. This podcast is a production of The Center for Literary Education and is a reading companion for teachers, homeschoolers, and readers of all stripes.
 
Some say children's tales... others say literary masterpieces. Some say old and irrelevant... others say current and life-changing. Putting to bed Sunday school theology, Pete and Mitch walk through the biblical narrative to reshape our childlike, simple views, and step into the complex, profound and life bringing truths waiting to be discovered.
 
Every week, join journalist and author Yomi Agedoke, and inspirational guests, including Elizabeth Day, Sara Pascoe and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie as they celebrate the best books written by women. They'll discuss this year's shortlisted titles, explore the life-changing books that sit on other women’s bookshelves and talk about what the future holds for women writing today. The Women’s Prize for Fiction is one of the most prestigious literary awards in the world, and has been running for over ...
 
La Literati is a show about poetry, books and creative, inspiring people of all kinds. We strive to bring you in depth interviews that illuminate. Every conversation is a story. We hope through our show, the listeners will develop a greater appreciation for writing, reading and those addicting things called book. Join hosts, Tosha Michelle and Jim aka Niles, the constant readers, as they take you on a literary journey of discovery, wonder and the fine art of reading- a Bibliophilia dream. Do ...
 
Sometimes emotional, often droll, occasionally literary, and always explicit, the Grey Warder explores Robert Jordan's epic fantasy series, taking a topical look at characters, themes, plots, scenes, and all things Wheel of Time-related. For fans familiar with the books looking for something different. (Episodes are marked for spoilers.) | https://twitter.com/WarderGrey?s=09 podcastofthedragon@gmail.com https://discord.gg/syCqfgr
 
Join me on an adventure. A literary romp through India. Bollywood and Books is a podcast for people who love travel, the written word and words into pictures - moving pictures. Discover magic, miracles and myths . . . from the Gateway of India and Bollywood in Mumbai to the canals of Kerala, and from the burning ghats on the Ganges in Varanasi to the Dalai Lama’s residence in McLeod Ganj. Experience India through chance encounters, conversations shared, and places stumbled upon as well as bo ...
 
The Read.Write.Repeat podcast was born from obsession. In its basic form, it is an obsession with storytelling. To our loved ones, it is just that, a strange quirk, nothing more. For us, it has evolved into a driving thirst that results in grandiose projects, strange discoveries, wild dreams, and the occasional hastily erected shrine. Come along as we impulsively pursue all manner of literary ecstasies and plan elaborate escapades and forays into all things reading, writing, and publishing. ...
 
An impoverished but loving young couple sacrifices their most precious possessions to buy Christmas gifts for each other. A tramp who is desperate to be sent to prison so he can escape the winter cold. Two depressed laborers get their palms read by a Coney Island mountebank. A yellow dog who relates the story of a fat lady and her hen pecked husband. These and other unforgettable characters form part of absolutely delightful and unforgettable short story collection, The Four Million by O Hen ...
 
Over twenty consecutive months, Charles Dickens enthralled readers with his monthly installments of the novel Bleak House, a complex and compelling portrayal of the English judicial system. Serialized in his own magazine, Household Words, between 1852 and 1853, the book is deemed to be his finest work and is his ninth novel. Using an innovative literary technique known as “free indirect discourse,” where the narrator himself speaks through the medium of one of his main characters, Dickens us ...
 
Writer/entertainer Garrison Keillor (A Prairie Home Companion) on “The Innocents Abroad”: “…one of the best selling travel books of all time.” (The Writer’s Almanac, June 8, 2012) When you dive into Mark Twain’s (Samuel Clemens’) The Innocents Abroad, you have to be ready to learn more about the unadorned, ungilded reality of 19th century “touring” than you might think you want to learn. This is a tough, literary journey. It was tough for Twain and his fellow “pilgrims”, both religious and o ...
 
King Solomon’s Mines is the story of the leader Allan Quatermain and his adventurous group of followers on their mission to find the lost brother of an aristocrat, Sir Henry Curtis. Considered similar to Robert Louise Stevenson’s novel Treasure Island, Haggard’s book proved to be another must-read adventure novel in the international literary world. The African desert hides underneath its sands myths and legends that lasted for centuries in the minds of the locals. Quatermain has a mysteriou ...
 
Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs was first published in 1913. It was the third book in an eleven part series known as the Barsoom Chronicles which relate to a sequence of exciting adventure tales set on the fictional planet of Barsoom. In the Barsoom series, Mars, assumed to be older than Earth, is a dying planet. “Barsoom” is the native word for Mars in the Martian language. The stories first appeared in serialized form in various magazines like All-Story, Argosy, Amazing Stories and ...
 
This story opens with a lovely, poor and proud young woman who lives with her aunt. The young woman saves the life of a farmer who subsequently falls in love with her. However, the young woman inherits a fortune and moves away. On the flip side the farmer loses everything he has and travels around the country seeking employment. One evening the farmer helps to put out a blazing fire in a lonely farm. When the veiled owner comes out to thank him, he discovers that she is none other than the b ...
 
An English tourist in a small, rural town in the South of France discovers an ancient manuscript with a strange illustration on the last page. A young orphan is sent to live with his elderly cousin, a secretive man who is obsessed with immortality. A picture that tells stories that change according to who is viewing it. These and other delicious, goose bump evoking tales are part of Ghost Stories of an Antiquary by Montague R James. A master of his craft, MR James was an academic and adminis ...
 
“A squeezing, wrenching, grasping, biting, clutching, covetous old sinner” is hardly hero material, but this is exactly what makes A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens such an unforgettable book and its hero, Ebenezer Scrooge such an extraordinarily enduring character. In the book's celebrated opening scene, on the night before Christmas the old miser Ebenezer Scrooge sits in his freezing cold counting house, oblivious to the discomfort of his shivering young assistant Bob Cratchit. Scrooge ...
 
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show series
 
On today's episode, Julia, Rider, and Tod discuss Brandon Hobson's new novel, The Removed, that follows a Cherokee family in Oklahoma in the aftermath of their son's death at the hands of a police officer. Today's sponsor: This episode is supported by GreenChef. Go to GreenChef.com/90disco and use code 90disco to get $90 off including free shipping…
 
Jeremy Black's new book on England in the Age of Austen, just published by Indiana University Press (2021), will be a treat for anyone who loves Jane - and who does not? - as well as anyone who is interested in her contexts. Black situates Austen's work in its social, political, economic and religious cultures, showing how her youthful commitments …
 
For the first time, one volume includes a discourse analysis of every writing in the New Testament. Discourse analysis of written texts involves examining units of language higher than the sentence and considering how the author used those units of language to accomplish communicative purposes. But discourse analysis is not a clearly defined method…
 
Izzy and Orlando enjoy a pre-ferry greasy spoon in Dover, get confused by Brexit rules in duty free and finally set sail for home. Izzy und Orlando genießen ein englisches Frühstück in Dover, werden mit den Brexit-Regeln im Duty Free konfrontiert und fahren schließlich nach Hause. Vor dem Mikrofon - In front of the microphone: Isabel Schmier und Or…
 
Stand-up comedian, podcaster and screenwriter Deborah Frances-White explains how a Helene Hanff book got her free tickets for life in London’s West End on this week’s Bookshelfie episode with Yomi Adegoke. Deborah is host of the hugely successful podcast The Guilty Feminist, which has also been made into a bestselling book. Her solo comedy shows ha…
 
Nell Shapiro Hawley and Sohini Sarah Pillai's book Many Mahābhāratas (SUNY Press, 2021) is an introduction to the spectacular and long-lived diversity of Mahābhārata literature in South Asia. This diversity begins with the Sanskrit Mahābhārata, an early epic poem that narrates the events of a catastrophic fratricidal war. Along the way, it draws in…
 
Felicia Rose Chavez' The Anti-Racist Writing Workshop: How to Decolonize the Creative Classroom (Breakbeat Poets, 2020) is a practical and persuasive guide to revolutionizing the teaching of creative writing. Combining theory, memoir, and pedagogy, this book guides the reader through the process of de-centering whiteness (and de-centering the instr…
 
In this episode, I interview Kas Saghafi, associate professor of philosophy at the University of Memphis, about his book The World After the End of the World, published through SUNY Press in 2020. In this book, Kas Saghafi argues that the notion of “the end the world” in Derrida’s late work is not a theological or cosmological matter, but a meditat…
 
In this episode, I interview Richard Kearney, professor of philosophy at Boston College, about his most recent book, Touch: Recovering Our Most Vital Sense. out through Columbia University Press. The basic premise of Touch is twofold: on the one hand, we have lost touch with our most basic sense, that of touch, the tactile; on the other hand, we mu…
 
Sarah Enni is the host and producer of First Draft and an author in her own right. This was a great conversation to wrap the TCL-Pandemic season, as Sarah and I got into therapy talk, making big life changes, the upsides of being "optimistically nihilistic" about publishing, the pros and cons of life hacking, and of course Burning Man. Thanks so mu…
 
The three decades that followed World War II were an exceptionally fertile period for American essays. The explosion of journals and magazines, the rise of public intellectuals, and breakthroughs in the arts inspired a flowering of literary culture. At the same time, the many problems that confronted mid-century America--racism, sexism, nuclear thr…
 
What is the story of race in American fiction? In Redlining Culture: A Data History of Racial Inequality and Postwar Fiction (Columbia University Press, 2020), Richard Jean So, an assistant professor of English in the Department of English at McGill University, uses computational and quantitative methods, alongside close textual analysis, to demons…
 
In this episode, I interview Michael Snediker, professor of English at the University of Houston, about his book, Contingent Figure: Chronic Pain and Queer Embodiment, recently published by University of Minnesota Press. At the intersection of queer theory and disability studies, Snediker locates something unexpected: chronic pain. Starting from th…
 
In this episode, I interview David Wills, professor of French Studies at Brown University, about his book, Prosthesis, recently republished for its 25th anniversary by University of Minnesota Press. A landmark work in posthuman thought that analyzes and explores the human body as a technology, the book promotes the idea that the human body is open …
 
Episode 1 - Why Bollywood and Books? [00:00:00] Join me on an adventure. A literary romp through India. Meet me at the corner of Patchouli and Chai, where books, cinema, and conversation collide. I'm Lovelace Cook. I'll be your tour guide. Welcome to Bollywood and Books. [00:00:23] Travel to India was never on my radar. I awoke one day like Rip Van…
 
No-one devours books like Sara Pascoe - on this week’s Bookshelfie she tells Yomi how reading novels you might disagree is a good antidote to an increasingly polarised world. Sara is a comedian, writer, actor, podcaster and presenter whose extensive TV credits include regular appearances on panel shows like Mock the Week, QI and Have I Got News for…
 
John Garth's The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien: The Places That Inspired Middle-Earth (Princeton University Press, 2020) takes you to the places that inspired J. R. R. Tolkien to create his fictional locations in The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, and other classic works. Written by renowned Tolkien expert John Garth, The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien featur…
 
Telling stories: that sounds innocuous enough. But for the first chronicle in the Japanese vernacular, A Tale of Flowering Fortunes (Eiga monogatari), there was more to worry about than a good yarn. The health of the community was at stake. Flowering Tales: Women Exorcising History in Heian Japan (Harvard University Press, 2020) is the first extens…
 
{Spoilers through Book 13, Towers of Midnight} Yes, it is absolutely possible to admire someone for being awesome and simultaneously cheer when she gets slapped! In this episode, the Grey Warder takes a look RJ's characterization of Egwene through The Dragon Reborn, and throws in a little analysis of Elayne and Nynaeve for good measure. Please supp…
 
In Salvage Poetics: Post-Holocaust American Jewish Folk Ethnographies (Wayne State University Press, 2020), Sheila Jelen explores how American Jewish post-Holocaust writers, scholars, and editors adapted pre-Holocaust works, such as Yiddish fiction and documentary photography, for popular consumption by American Jews in the post-Holocaust decades. …
 
Shop BiblioFiles: www.centerforlit.com/the-bibliofiles-shop What is the most effective way to work change in the world? The CenterForLit crew contemplates this question by discussing James K.A. Smith’s recent article for The Christian Century. We look at the difference between philosophy and art, and examine the role of story in the career of a Chr…
 
The election of Barack Obama propelled the idea of a post-racial United States, or that the country had moved beyond race as a defining feature of social difference and beyond racism as an everyday reality. Dr. Danielle Fuentes Morgan examines the ways in which African American comedians and cultural producers took aim at such claims through the le…
 
Consumption and the Literary Cookbook, edited by Roxanne Harde and Janet Wesselius (published 2021 by Routledge) examines the ways in which recipe authors and readers engage with one another through reading, cooking and eating the foods contained within the pages of Literary Cookbooks. The editors define literary cookbooks as novels and memoirs tha…
 
Join special guest - Women’s Prize for Fiction ‘Winner of Winners’ - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie as she discusses the five books which have shaped her career, and her latest release, Notes on Grief, with Yomi Adegoke. Chimamanda is an internationally acclaimed author whose novel Half of a Yellow Sun won the Women’s Prize in 2007 and was adapted into a…
 
Ramsey McGlazer's Old Schools: Modernism, Education, and the Critique of Progress (Fordham University Press, 2020), traces the ways in which a group of modernist cultural practitioners (thinkers, politicians, artists, poets, novelists, and filmmakers) across varied linguistic and cultural contexts ((Italian, English, Irish, and Brazilian) resisted …
 
Izzy and Orlando get in a bit of a pickle at the Imperial War Museum and bump into poetry expert Jessica Bundschuh...... Izzy und Orlando treffen im Imperial War Museum die Lyrik Expertin Jessica Bundschuh . Gemeinsam mit Ihr schlendern sie durch das Museum und geraten in Probleme. Vor dem Mikrofon - In front of the microphone: Isabel Schmier und O…
 
Anecdote, Network, Gossip, Performance: Essays on the Shishuo xinyu (Harvard UP, 2021) is a study of the Shishuo xinyu, the most important anecdotal collection of medieval China—and arguably of the entire traditional era. In a set of interconnected essays, Jack W. Chen offers new readings of the Shishuo xinyu that draw upon social network analysis,…
 
During the middle decades of the twentieth century, the production of America’s consumer culture was centralized in New York to an extent unparalleled in the history of the United States. Every day tens of thousands of writers, editors, artists, performers, technicians, and secretaries made advertisements, produced media content, and designed the s…
 
A scholarly and imaginative reconstruction of the voyage Daniel Defoe took from the pillory to literary immortality, The Shortest Way with Defoe: Robinson Crusoe, Deism, and the Novel (University of Virginia Press, 2020) contends that Robinson Crusoe contains a secret satire, written against one person, that has gone undetected for 300 years. By lo…
 
Philip Boehm, who has translated over thirty books from German and Polish into English, has translated a recently discovered German manuscript Darkness at Noon (Scribner, 2019) by the late Arthur Koestler. Originally published in 1940, Koestler’s book eventually became an international bestseller. He told in fictional form the realistic story of a …
 
Aaron Andrews, our resident journalist, is back on BiblioFiles to discuss his recent opinion piece concerning the Dr. Seuss controversy with Adam and Ian. We talk about what it looks like for a charitable reader to encounter offensive material, a reader’s relationship to a troubling past, and why it’s difficult to have civil conversations about sen…
 
In Training for Catastrophe: Fictions of National Security After 9/11 (University of Minnesota Press, 2021), author Lindsay Thomas studies the relationship between fiction and U.S. national security — specifically, the instrumentalization of fiction in preparedness materials, in which fictional events are phrased not only as real, but as producing …
 
What role did culture play in the British Empire? In Imperial Encore: The Cultural Project of the Late British Empire Caroline Ritter, an Assistant Professor of History at Texas State University, explores the importance of culture in maintaining Imperial domination, and then in supporting post-Imperial British influence. Using core case studies of …
 
Angkarn Kallayanapong (1926-2012) was arguably Thailand’s most famous poet of the modern period. His career spanned the era from the 1940s to the 1980s when Thai society was fundamentally transformed by rapid economic development and the process of globalization. His poetry is a testament to the massive disruption, dislocation, and alienation cause…
 
Join new host Yomi Adegoke as she explores the Bookshelfie titles which have inspired writer and podcaster Elizabeth Day. Elizabeth is an award-winning journalist, the author of six books, spanning fiction and non-fiction, and host of the critically acclaimed hit podcast - How To Fail - which explores how failure can ultimately lead to success. She…
 
Ever since J. W. DeForest popularized the phrase "Great American Novel" in 1868 commentators have debated the limits of all three of its components. Does "great" necessarily mean a big "doorstop" book or is concision a worthy goal? Whose version America are we talking? And why the novel not a poem, play, or short story? In our inaugural episode we …
 
Listen to this interview of Joan Turner, author of On Writtenness: The Cultural Politics of Academic Writing (Bloomsbury Academic 2018). We talk about writers, writing, writers writing, unwritten subtexts, and written text. Interviewer: "What do you see as the step which writing practitioners can take in the direction of their discipline-based coll…
 
Jane Alison's Meander, Spiral, Explode: Design and Pattern in Narrative (Catapult, 2019) is a fascinating tour through a wide range of narrative structures that are inspired by forms in the natural world. As Jane Alison writes, "For centuries there's been one path through fiction we're most likely to travel--one we're actually told to follow--and t…
 
This week, Julia, Tod, and Rider celebrate Literary Disco’s ninth birthday by breaking out some book games. In Judging a Book by Its Cover, Rider reads the first few lines of a book while Tod and Julia try to guess the era, genre, author, and even the book itself. In Game Two, Julia and Rider try to decipher between a poem, a song, a popular song, …
 
{Spoilers through Book 12, The Gathering Storm} The Grey Warder takes a look at the Dark One's Chosen and breaks down their dirty dealings in Book 3, to unlock the puzzle and figure out exactly who is doing exactly what, and why are they doing it? (She also lies in the outro and says she was a guest on Way of the Leaf's Tavern Talk, not knowing it …
 
Tracey Baptiste is the author of numerous books for young readers, including the beloved Jumbies series and the New York Times Bestselling Minecraft: the Crash. This episode is not only brimming with the delicious process stuff we love here at TCL, it also gave me several potentially life-changing revelations when Tracey shared with me about recrea…
 
During 2020, in search of things to do from home, I started attending some of the virtual movie talks that writer and critic Walter Chaw gives with guests via the Denver Public Library. They’ve been a true highlight of All This, as Walter’s knowledge is wide and deep and generous. Like all good film critics, he’s also an insightful critic of cultur…
 
Lindsay Eagar is an author and writing coach with a recent ADHD diagnosis. She’s been very open about it online and generous with my personal questions, and I wanted to bring her on for a more topic-focused episode. In this case: our brains! Lindsay shares her background, symptoms, diagnosis process, and management strategies in ways that I found s…
 
Dave Connis is not only the legendary composer of the theme music for this very podcast, but also an author in his own right, with two YA novels out and a picture book on the way. The emotional theme music of this episode is honesty. Dave and I get into matters of art and faith, how a sudden loss changed his writing life and drive, and how not to b…
 
In the seventeenth century, Japanese popular prose flourished as waves of newly literate readers gained access to the printed word. Commercial publishers released vast numbers of titles in response to readers’ hunger for books that promised them potent knowledge. However, traditional literary histories of this period position the writings of Ihara …
 
Picking up where most historians conclude, Chelsea Stieber explores the critical internal challenge to Haiti’s post-independence sovereignty: a civil war between monarchy and republic. What transpired was a war of swords and of pens, waged in newspapers and periodicals, in literature, broadsheets, and fliers. In Haiti's Paper War: Post-Independence…
 
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