Inquiring Minds 공개
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Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
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This week: New research on the first known interstellar object in our solar system, A/2017 U1—or Oumuamua—suggesting it’s probably a chunk of a Pluto-like planet, and not from aliens; research that used 2,000 microphones to get super detailed recordings of hummingbirds and learn how they make the sounds they make; the impact of alcohol consumption …
 
On the show this week we talk to professor of story science Angus Fletcher about his new book Wonderworks: The 25 Most Powerful Inventions in the History of Literature. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
On the show this week we talk to professor of genetic epidemiology Tim Spector about his new book Spoon-Fed: Why almost everything we’ve been told about food is wrong. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
This week: We look at new paleogenetic research on mammoth molars; delve into the biological drive for napping; and talk about a surprising new study on memory that involves transcranial magnetic stimulation. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
We talk to behavioral scientist and former lead researcher at Google's behavioral economics unit Logan Ury about her new book How to Not Die Alone: The Surprising Science That Will Help You Find Love. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Your voice is much more than just the medium by which your thoughts can be heard—it's as fundamental to who you are as your face or your fingerprints. This week we talk to journalist John Colapinto about his new book This Is the Voice. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
We talk to neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett about why the idea that you have a lizard brain and a rational brain is completely wrong, how you can fight against implicit biases by swamping your brain with new data, why your brain’s most important job isn’t actually to think or be rational, and about one time Carl Sagan was very wrong about how br…
 
This week we explore the implications of there being much more water on the moon than we previously thought; a new study that looked at the possibility that our brains have an underlying propensity to understand words; and a quick look at a paper about Tennessee bicycle crashes. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudi…
 
A special drop of the first episode of the new season of Indre’s other podcast, Cadence—which is about what music can tell us about our minds. This new season explores how music influences us, and the first episode is all about politics. Indre talks to musicians, academics, and politicians to find out what role music plays in the political machine—…
 
This week: new research on how climate change is affecting autumn wildfires; a study that attempts to use a biologically inspired and technically enhanced enzymatic solution to break down plastics, and a study showing that whether blue whales are foraging or migrating affects what time of day they sing songs. Support the show: https://www.patreon.c…
 
We talk to journalist and author Lee van der Voo about her new book As the World Burns: The New Generation of Activists and the Landmark Legal Fight Against Climate Change. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
This week we talk to Sara Hendren, an artist, writer, and professor at Olin College of Engineering about her new book What Can a Body Do?: How We Meet the Built World. Hendren's book explores the idea that perhaps many people are disabled not by the shape of their body or how they work, but instead by the shape of the built environment in which the…
 
This week: A deep look into new research on the relationship between how you sleep and the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease, including an interview with the study’s author, Matt Walker, and two neuroscientists review Elon Musk’s recent Neuralink announcement and explain what they got right and what they got very wrong. Support the show:…
 
We talk to Scottish psychologist Stuart Ritchie about his new book Science Fictions: How Fraud, Bias, Negligence, and Hype Undermine the Search for Truth. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
This week: A new study showing how you can, as a way to control their population, change blood-drinking female mosquitoes to male, non-biting mosquitoes by changing just one gene; research into new ways for robots to grab things; a study showing the ways in which the pupils of people who have PTSD react differently than others, even in emotionally-…
 
We talk to environmental attorney Barbara Freese about her new book Industrial-Strength Denial: Eight Stories of Corporations Defending the Indefensible, from the Slave Trade to Climate Change. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
This week: New astrophysics research on the likelihood of there being intelligent life on other planets in our solar system; a study in which atomic force microscopy was used to study the biology of yeast; research into why the chlorophyll in plants doesn’t absorb peak (green) sunlight; and a look at a study that involves watching wasps fight each …
 
We talk to Robert Rosencrans, an MD/PhD student at the The University of Alabama at Birmingham about the history of structural racism in medicine and the problems with race-based medicine. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
In her book, The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another, materials scientist Ainissa Ramirez explores how eight inventions—clocks, steel rails, copper communication cables, photographic film, light bulbs, hard disks, scientific labware, and silicon chips—shaped human society. In this episode, we explore the importance of mater…
 
We talk to astrophysicist Mario Livio about his new book Galileo: And the Science Deniers. A note before today’s episode: We have all been watching the escalation of police violence against protesters and Black people and if you consider yourself someone who cares about the injustices and racism being levied against Black communities, I want to ask…
 
We talk to writer Keith Law about the behavioral economics of baseball and his new book The Inside Game: Bad Calls, Strange Moves, and What Baseball Behavior Teaches Us About Ourselves. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
This week: New research on a biological enzyme that can break down the plastic we use for water bottles; a brief look into the history of egg decorating; a new study on the social consequences of a financially contingent self-worth; and a summary of new research involving jazz guitarists improvising while wearing EEGs on their heads. Support the sh…
 
We talk to journalist and founder of the Neurodiversity Project Jenara Nerenberg about her new book Divergent Mind: Thriving in a World That Wasn't Designed for You. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
We talk to social psychologist David Dunning about his well-known 1999 study on why people are so bad at knowing how smart they are. He explains what people get wrong about it today, and what he’s learned since then. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
We talk to Jessica Powell, a writer and former VP of Communications for Google, about her new book The Big Disruption: A Totally Fictional but Essentially True Silicon Valley Story. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.저자 Indre Viskontas
 
This week: scientists successfully germinated 2,000-year-old date palm seeds and we might soon know what 2,000-year-old dates taste like; another group of researchers 3D modeled a 3,000-year-old mummy’s vocal tract and what they may have sounded like; and new research on how support cells in brains, called microglia, affect memory in mice. Support …
 
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