Gone Cold Podcast 공개
[search 0]

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
After leaving her Grandmother’s house to attend her best friend’s wake on a Friday in March of 2014, 24-year-old mother D’Lisa Kelley, who was expecting another child, vanished. Even considering the circumstances that made it crystal clear she was in incredible danger, Dallas’s 911 dispatch failed to act. It wasn’t until the next day police created…
 
On March 7th, 2014, 24-year-old mother D’Lisa Kelley, who was expecting another child, left her Grandmother’s home on foot to attend her best friend’s wake. She didn’t have a ride but knew the Oak Cliff neighborhood well, so D’Lisa figured she’d run into someone willing to drive her. D’Lisa inadvertently called her sister about 40 minutes after lea…
 
Beginning in 1967, a series of murders in Fort Worth that had at least a few similarities began. Their obvious similarity: they all took place in the month of February. We’ve covered four of them on gone cold: Mildred May in 1967, Becky Martin in 1973, Carla Walker in 1974, and June Ward in 1977. The murders became known by some members of law enfo…
 
By 1959, Vernon and Hattie Stanley were long settled into their empty nest in a quiet, middle class neighborhood in Fort Worth’s northside. Vernon, a veteran of World War I, had retired from working at the used car lot he owned, and the couple was enjoying their golden years. On June 10th of that year, however, Hattie and Vernon were brutally slain…
 
The Story of Jolaine Hemmy and Pecos Jane Doe Back in August 2019, we released an episode telling the story of the death of a Jane Doe at the Roper’s Motel in Pecos, Texas in July of 1966. Not long before that, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) contacted the new police chief there, Lisa Tarango, and asked her to work wi…
 
If you could call a number and say you’re sorry, and no one would know…what would you apologize for? For fifteen years, you could call a number in Manhattan and do just that. This is the story of the line, and the man at the other end who became consumed by his own creation. He was known as “Mr. Apology.” As thousands of callers flooded the line, c…
 
Two more semi-well-known criminals have been woven into the fabric of this story, the story of the disappearances of Rachel Trlica, Renee Wilson, and Julie Moseley. In this final part of our series on The Fort Worth Missing Trio: The “Mall Passer,” aka James Mitchell DeBardeleben, and the confessor of “The Eleven That Went To Heaven,” Edward Harold…
 
When Private Investigator Dan James came on the case in the mid-1990s, he was continuing work he’d already been doing in his spare time since Rachel Trlica, Renee Wilson, and Julie Moseley disappeared on December 23rd, 1974. When reviewing the report he sent to the Fort Worth Police, it’s sometimes difficult to know exactly what the PI was reportin…
 
Whether officially or as the result of citizen sleuthing, there have been many persons of interest in the disappearances of Julie Moseley, Renee Wilson, and Rachel Trlica. On this episode: a suspect in the eyes of a retired Fort Worth burglary detective, a Cowtown Speedway stock car driver and convicted pedophile, a recently convicted abductor and …
 
After doing everything they knew to do and after coming to the conclusion that the Fort Worth Police were not, the families of 17-year-old Rachel Trlica, 14-year-old Renee Wilson, and 9-year-old Julie Moseley decided to get some outside help. They hired private investigator Jon Winter Swaim, a polarizing figure in the city who was known to get resu…
 
In the days and weeks following the disappearances of 17-year-old Rachel Trlica, 14-year-old Renee Wilson, and 9-year-old Julie Moseley on December 24th, 1974, and after the arrival of the infamous letter, things continued to grow more complicated and confusing. Bad tips, terribly cruel prank calls, and strange sightings took up more valuable time …
 
On December 24th, 1974, the day following the disappearances of 17-year-old Rachel Trlica, 14-year-old Renee Wilson, and 9-year-old Julie Moseley – Rachel’s husband received a letter in the mailbox. The letter claimed to be from Rachel and said that the missing girls had gone to Houston to, quote, “get away.” They’d be back in a week, it said. Cont…
 
Nineteen eighty was going to be Dorothy Stratten’s year. Playboy’s Hugh Hefner thought it might even be her decade. She was just 20 years old, the girl next door with the shy smile and whispery voice who didn’t know her own beauty. But who was Dorothy really? And how did her rise to fame ultimately lead to her death? This is a six-part series about…
 
On December 23rd, 1974, just a couple days before Christmas, three girls – 17-year-old Rachel Trlica, 14-year-old Renee Wilson, and 9-year-old Julie Moseley – set out for a shopping trip. They had two destinations in mind. One was the local Army Navy surplus/discount store, where Rene would get some items out of layaway, and the other was Seminary …
 
In April of 1987, authorities in Carter County, Oklahoma found a Watauga, Texas woman on the side of the highway barely clinging to life. She was bound with duct tape, severely beaten, and covered in the blood that had poured from the slit in her throat. The woman was Martha Martinez Maxwell. After doctors at Dallas’s Parkland Hospital saved her li…
 
On April 25th, 1978, 25-year-old Paula Jean Davenport left home to go bowling with her company’s league. She never made it into the Brunswick Bowlerland, however, and never made it back home. Paula’s parents reported her missing to police but was found a couple days later by another jurisdiction, deceased from gunshot wounds. A suspect emerged quic…
 
In January of 2019, in far south Boerne, Texas, a Bexar County 911 dispatcher received a call. There’d been a suicide, the caller said. Three people – Nichol Olsen and her daughters Alexa and London – were shot to death in a home belonging to Nichol’s boyfriend. The deaths were later ruled a murder-suicide but as friends of Nichol Olsen began speak…
 
Loading …

빠른 참조 가이드

Google login Twitter login Classic login