Story In The Public Square 공개
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“Story in the Public Square” is a year-round initiative to study and celebrate public storytelling. It features an annual conference, lectures, awards and student contests, as well as original scholarship about public storytelling and how those stories can affect the public debate. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal, and is directed by visiting fellow G. Wayne Miller with Pell Center executive director Jim Ludes.
 
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show series
 
Throughout American history, leadership has played an important role, and it continues to matter as we grapple with the lingering effect of the pandemic, intractable political disputes, and disputes about the integrity of American elections. Despite all this, David Gergen pins his hope on the public leaders who he believes can lead the country to a…
 
In the summer of 2016, Seth Rich, a young employee of the Democratic National Committee, was murdered in Washington, D.C. His death became fertile ground for conspiracy theories peddled by some Americans and certain foreign intelligence services. Andy Kroll gives us the truth about what happened that night and what those conspiracy theories have co…
 
The threats to American democracy seem to grow every day, not from some external threat, but from within: revelations about the January 6 insurrection, gerrymandered Congressional districts and even restrictions on voting rights proposed or in place across the country. Marc Morial helps document those threats to American democracy and offers lesson…
 
Too frequently, the captions flash across the lower third of the television screen: another mass shooting; more innocent lives cut short. The debate in the following days follows a well-worn script of hopeless resignation and incensed outrage. But Mark Follman says there are techniques and methods already in use that successfully prevent mass shoot…
 
Nowadays, science is often reduced to facts, data and analysis which can seem impersonal and cold. But science journalist Mark Johnson brings the human capacity for empathy to his reporting. He has become known within the industry as someone who brings great knowledge and great empathy to his scientific coverage. See omnystudio.com/listener for pri…
 
The evidence is overwhelming: the impact of COVID-19 on communities of color was out of proportion to the size of those communities in the overall American population. Dr. Yohuru Williams is among a group of scholars whose new book argues the experience with COVID is consistent with other difficult experiences in American history. Williams is an ac…
 
Often, politics can feel like a thankless and often futile undertaking. But White House chief speechwriter Cody Keenan tells his readers that occasionally, through long and sustained effort, the world moves. Keenan began his political career as an intern and legislative aide to senator Edward M. Kennedy. He earned a master’s degree in public policy…
 
For most of the last 20 years, the conversation about American national security has been focused on the threats posed by extremists. With the death of al Qaeda Leader Ayman al Zawahiri, Russia’s war in Ukraine, and rising tensions with China, Javed Ali argues that conversation has swung back to great-power competition. Ali is an associate professo…
 
People come from all over the world to access cutting-edge care in American hospitals. But Linda Villarosa describes a different experience for Black Americans, who she says “live sicker, and die quicker” than their white compatriots. Villarosa is a journalist, author, editor, novelist and educator. A contributing writer for the New York Times Maga…
 
Indigenous artists often straddle a space created by white anthropologists between art and craft. Cannupa Hanska Luger grapples with that dichotomy. Creating art from tradition that, in its time, was purely practical. And seeing his own contemporary activism viewed as art when it was, in fact, protest. Luger is a multidisciplinary artist and an enr…
 
The social determinants of health—how living conditions, family life, poverty, homelessness and other factors affect human health—have emerged as key factors in understanding health outcomes. Dr. Maria Raven shines a critical light on the complexity of cases she sees every day in one major city’s emergency room. Raven is a practicing emergency medi…
 
When Russian forces invaded Ukraine earlier this year, Dr. Michael Fine was outraged—like a lot of Americans. So he traveled to see first-hand the human cost of this war. Dr. Michael Fine serves as the Chief Health Strategist for the city of Central Falls, R.I. and as a family physician with a practice in Rhode Island. He is the author of several b…
 
Of all the hashtag social movements, #MeToo has proven among the most enduring—for its truth, for the power imbalance it revealed, and because so many women had the courage to speak out. Winnie M Li told her story in her first novel. Now, in her second novel, she tells another about appearance, reality, and the facades that dominate public life, wh…
 
We grow up being educated on the power of science to explain the physical world. But Dr. Elena Conis offers a more complex view of the role of science in public life—and the stories and understanding it offers all of us as we grapple with everything from pesticides, to vaccines, and climate change. Conis is a writer and historian of medicine, publi…
 
The long arc of history bends towards greater and more complex levels of cooperation. But Jonathan Haidt says that over the last 10 years American society has become ever more fragmented—all thanks to the rise of social media. Haidt is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University’s Stern School of Business and a social p…
 
Caring for a sick or aging loved one can be an uncertain journey filled with every emotion—from love and devotion to anger and frustration. Dave Iverson pulls back the curtain on the decade he spent caring for his elderly mother to offer a modern love story with insights and meaning for anyone who is a caregiver or anyone who has ever loved. Iverso…
 
Infectious disease has shaped the course of human history—and, as the last couple of years remind us, it continues to do so. Vidya Krishnan puts the focus on more than just the viruses and bacteria that cause illness, she turns our attention to societal factors like race, gender, and class to understand the anti-science rhetoric and politics that s…
 
Food is central to the daily existence of Americans, whether we are growing it, shopping for it, preparing it, or consuming it. Dr. Joseph C. Ewoodzie, Jr. argues that, for many, food intersects with race and class to help form our identity as individuals. Ewoodzie is an associate professor of sociology and the Vann Professor of Racial Justice at D…
 
In 2021 online video games produced more than $180 billion in revenue for more than 2.8 billion users. Dr. Jessica White warns that hidden in all of that cash and among all of those users are extremists who encourage and often inspire real-world violence. White is a Senior Research Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute who works in their Te…
 
In 2021 online video games produced more than $180 billion in revenue for more than 2.8 billion users. Dr. Jessica White warns that hidden in all of that cash and among all of those users are extremists who encourage and often inspire real-world violence. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Noses—and their ability to detect smell—may not be as celebrated in words and songs as our other human senses—but Saskia Wilson-Brown says scents tell stories, too. Wilson-Brown began her career in music video and production design, going on to serve as festival co-director for Los Angeles’ seminal Silver Lake Film Festival, launching the festival’…
 
Russia’s war in Ukraine has killed thousands while displacing millions of Ukrainians. For many Western journalists, the war has made it untenable to report from Russia amid a crack-down on independent journalism. Anton Troianovski has seen Russia up close, reporting there first for The Washington Post and, now, as the bureau chief for The New York …
 
It’s been said that truth is the first casualty of war. As Russia wages its war in Ukraine, Darren Linvill sounds the alarm that social media, which has long had its own problems with the truth, is again a platform for Russian disinformation. Linvill is a social media forensics expert and Associate Professor at Clemson University. He investigates d…
 
Democratic backsliding isn’t limited to weak governments abroad. Rachel Kleinfeld warns about the dangers facing American democracy, including the growing acceptance of intimidation and even political violence in some communities. Rachel Kleinfeld is a senior fellow in the Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program at the Carnegie Endowment for In…
 
Traumatic brain injuries can have lifelong impacts on cognitive and psychological function. Dr. Eve Valera studies these injuries among survivors of domestic violence and says they have serious mental health impacts. Valera is an associate professor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and a research scientist at Massachusetts General Hospital. …
 
Cartoons communicate ideas in ways words cannot. Canadian artist and humorist John Atkinson shares his unique take on the world through his cartoon series, “Wrong Hands” creations. Born and raised in Ottawa, Canada, John Atkinson has been writing and drawing his cartoon series, “Wrong Hands,” for over ten years. After graduating from the University…
 
A decade ago, social media could be seen as a well-spring of democratic innovation and potential. Events of the last six years may have changed the public’s perception on that score, but Katie Harbath warns that social media platforms have much more work to do to protect democracy in the United States and around the world. Harbath is a global leade…
 
Tyranny comes in many forms, but its central elements of violence, lost glories, and corruption seem to repeat. Ruth Ben-Ghiat warns that autocrats have risen frequently from democracy over the last century by relying on a simple playbook that has proved as durable as it is menacing. Ben-Ghiat is a historian and commentator on fascism, authoritaria…
 
So much of our modern life is built upon simplifying the complex. We reduce social interactions to likes and follows on social media and dilute the “news” in our favorite echo chambers. But Azar Nafisi warns that life is not simple and the complexity found in great literature is ultimately liberating of the mind and essential to the health of our d…
 
America is a study in contrasts: from the pomp and circumstance of a presidential inauguration to the reality of hunger across the land, Maddie McGarvey documents life in the United States as only a photojournalist can. Maddie McGarvey is a freelance photographer based in Columbus, Ohio. She graduated from Ohio University’s School of Visual Communi…
 
The 2022 Academy Award nominations are out. Pete Hammond says they celebrate a remarkable array of films exploring topics as diverse as toxic masculinity and environmental catastrophe. Hammond is widely considered to be one of the preeminent awards analysts for both film and television and is the Chief Film Critic for Deadline Hollywood, where he h…
 
The line between what is right and what is just isn’t always clear. Laura Coates is a former federal prosecutor who describes how she reconciled ideas of justice, race, the role of law enforcement in our society, and her own role in the U.S. justice system. Laura Coates is a CNN senior legal analyst, SiriusXM host and author of “Just Pursuit: A Bla…
 
It’s one thing to say that politics has always been a tough business, but it’s another to confront the reality that public insults have become more frequent, more intense, and more personal. Ruth Colker explains this is not an accident, but often part of intentional efforts to hijack public issues. Colker is a leading scholar in the areas of Consti…
 
For one generation of Americans, civil and sectarian violence in Northern Ireland was brought into our homes through regular reporting on the nightly news. For a younger generation, it was brought home in the powerful lyrics of the band known as U2. Tom Kelly and Kevin Hasson of the Bogside Artists are creating street art and murals that remember t…
 
It’s not much of an exaggeration to say the internet changed all of us and everything around us. Just look at the way we communicate, earn money, date, entertain, and inform ourselves. Pamela Paul chronicles the things we’ve lost in the process—the charm that comes with some uncertainty and the romance of the time before the internet. Paul is the e…
 
Some of the most popular and profitable stories today are based on characters created and developed by authors and artists at Marvel Comics. Douglas Wolk has read all 27,000 issues to unpack the hopes, anxieties, and cultural aspirations in their half-million pages. Douglas Wolk is a pop culture critic, teacher and writer, and the author of “All of…
 
The rise of instant updates from today’s online news sources have left many to regard the local newspaper as a thing of the past. But Atr Cullen describes how he and his family have kept Iowa’s Storm Lake Times newspaper alive and prosperous in the digital age. Cullen is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and editor of The Storm Lake Times, a fami…
 
In the 1930s, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt saw war coming with Hitler’s Germany even as he reconciled the isolationism of American politics with his own internationalist instinct. Ambassador David McKean tells the story of FDR’s personal reliance on his hand-picked ambassadors to Europe in the critical years before America’s entry into World…
 
Most Americans want to believe that the United States of America as a bastion of liberal democracy. But Michael Paul Williams is a columnist whose work exposes the illiberal elements in American society, including white supremacy, banning books, and vigilantism. Michael Paul Williams is a native of Richmond and longtime columnist at the Richmond Ti…
 
According to the CDC, more than 588,000 Americans have died from opioid overdose since 1999. Danny Strong tells the story of that epidemic in “Dopesick,” a new series on Hulu. Danny Strong is one of the most prolific TV and big-screen talents today, with more than 75 acting, screenwriting, producing, directing, show running and creating credits, th…
 
The planet is warming. This isn’t conjecture and it isn’t political: it’s the overwhelming conclusion of climate scientists from all over the world. Now, for a long time, the debate has been over whether and how we mitigate the threats posed by climate change. But Alice C. Hill warns that debate needs to be expanded to include a discussion about th…
 
2021 is the second year of the pandemic, and it began, almost immediately, with a violent insurrection at the United States Capitol. Dr. Evelyn Farkas helps us put the big stories of the last 12 months in context even as we name the top story of 2021. Dr. Farkas has three decades of experience working on national security and foreign policy in the …
 
The demands society places on women—the choices they make about their lives, their relationships, and their appearance—can be overwhelming. Lindsay Crouse exposes those expectations to the bright light of day and forces all of us to consider our own roles in them. Crouse is a film producer and senior editor at The New York Times. A Rhode Island nat…
 
There are some who argue that the United States of America as a nation, should be defined by its civic identity. A federal Republic that’s found he promised equality under the law and Liberty to all of its people. But there’s a darker side to the American history too, one built on ethnonationalism and white supremacy. Colin Woodard traces the rise …
 
Every president, every public servant in the United States, raises their hand and takes an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic. Robert Costa says the end of the Trump presidency saw an unprecedented threat to the Constitutional order emanating from the White House itself. Robert…
 
Since early 2000, the world has become familiar with the impacts of COVID-19: isolation, mask-wearing, and, for far too many, disease and death. Dr. Shekhar Saxena says there’s another impact we are just beginning to grapple with: the way the pandemic has affected global mental health. Saxena is Professor of the Practice of Global Mental Health at …
 
Democrats and Republicans don’t agree on much—and, generally speaking, they don’t agree on health care policy. But Robert Hackey and Todd Olszewski tell us that there is a rich history and potential for actual cooperation on policies intended to keep Americans healthy and the nation strong. Bob Hackey is a Professor of Health Policy and Management …
 
Forests have long been celebrated in literature as a repository or life and solitude. But Dr. Suzanne Simard says they are also an important repository of wisdom—a wisdom passed from tree to tree as they communicate with one another. Dr. Simard is a Professor of Forest Ecology in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University …
 
The promise of a liberal arts education has always been the insight offered to us by classic texts about the human experience. Emily Allen-Hornblower and Nafeesah Goldsmith tell us the appeal is not limited just to traditional students in classrooms, but also students learning in environments as challenging as the American judicial system. Emily Al…
 
On January 6, 2021, a violent mob stormed the U.S. Capitol seeking to disrupt the peaceful transfer of power. While our attention has been consumed with things like the pandemic, vaccines, and America’s withdrawal from Afghanistan, Scott MacFarlane reminds us that the investigations into the events of that day—and the prosecutions of those responsi…
 
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