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John Keats is perhaps the most talented poet of the English Romantic Period. Although his life was cut short by disease at the age of 25, he produced some of the most famous poems in world literature. Less erudite and philosophical than Shelley and not so technically versatile as Byron, he displayed a sure poetic instinct and an amazing ability to appeal powerfully to the senses and to the emotions by the brilliance of his diction. Thus his poetry is noted more for exquisite feeling than for ...
 
“Good fences make good neighbors...” If, as a reader, this is one line you do remember, then the poet Robert Frost would have fulfilled his purpose. The highest goal of a poet, he claimed, was to “lodge a few poems where they would be hard to get rid of...” Unforgettable lines and indelible memories are connected with our encounters with America's best-loved and most popular poet. His wonderful pictures of rural life and the deeply philosophical insights they offer remain with us long after ...
 
Emily Dickinson has come to be regarded as one of the quintessential poets of 19th century America. A very private poet with a very quiet and reclusive life, her poetry was published posthumously and immediately found a wide audience.While she echoed the romantic natural themes of her times, her style was much more free and irregular, causing many to criticize her and editors to “correct” her. In the early 20th century, when poetic style had become much looser, new audiences learned to appre ...
 
Offering knowledge and tools for appreciating Shakespeare's deep and universal meanings. Series I Short sessions on background information (numbered); Series 2 longer sessions on individual plays and sonnets (lettered). Series I Chapter 1: What's So Great about Shakespeare? (3 sessions) Chapter 2: Shakespeare the Man Chapter 3: Shakespeare's Theater Chapter 4: Shakespeare's Language (4 sessions) Chapter 5: Shakespeare's Characters Chapter 6: Unity in Variety (3 sessions) Chapter 7: Shakespea ...
 
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Series I, Chapter 15: The Nature of Art, Session 2 Based on the teaching of Professor Mary Holmes Topics: Paradox 2: Escape and Return Paradox 3: I and We Paradox 4: Integrity and Change The Power of Art The Goal of Art Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.com저자 Doctor Rap
 
Series I, Chapter 15: The Nature of Art, Session 1 Based on the teaching of Professor Mary Holmes Session 1 Topics: Why Art? What is Art? How Art Works Paradox 1: Empathy and Psychic Distance The Willing Suspension of Disbelief Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.com저자 Doctor Rap
 
Series I, Chapter 14: Hypothetical, Spurious, and False Shakespeare Hypothetical: Love's Labour's Won, Cardenio Spurious: Hecate passages in Macbeth False Attributions: "The Passionate Pilgrim," Arden of Feversham, "Shall I Die?" A Funeral Elegy Notes: References are to the following: F.E. Halliday, A Shakespeare Companion 1564–1964 (Baltimore: Pen…
 
Series I, Chapter 13: Did Shakespeare Collaborate? Edward III Pericles Henry VIII The Two Noble Kinsmen Sir Thomas More References are to the following: Melchiori, Giorgio, ed. The New Cambridge Shakespeare: King Edward III (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 12–13; Hallett Smith, Introduction to Pericles, Prince of Tyre in G. Blakem…
 
Series II, Podcast W: The Tempest Shakespeare's most mystical play. References are to the following: C.S. Lewis, The Discarded Image (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1964, repr. 1967), Chapter VI; C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man (New York: HarperCollins, 2001, orig. copyright 1944), pp. 77–78; Frank Kermode, ed., Arden edition of The Tempes…
 
Series I, Chapter 12: Shakespeare's Other Poems Venus and Adonis The Rape of Lucrece The Phoenix and the Turtle A Lover's Complaint Notes: I have taken some facts and quotations from the following: On The Rape of Lucrece: Hallett Smith, Introduction to The Rape of Lucrece in G. Glakemore Evans, ed., The Riverside Shakespeare, Second Edition (Boston…
 
Series II, Podcast T: Henry V Pageant Shakespeare's Ideal King Banishment of Falstaff Note: The Thompson quotation is from Philip Thompson, Notes on Shakespeare in Gideon Rappaport, ed., Dusk and Dawn: Poetry and Prose of Philip Thompson (San Diego: One Mind Good Presss, 2005), p. 228.저자 Doctor Rap
 
Series II, Podcast S: Henry IV, Part II Promise Fulfilled: Prince Hal becomes King Henry V Defense of Prince John Falstaff's Banishment Note: The Thompson quotation is from Notes on Shakespeare in Philip Thompson, Dusk and Dawn: Poems and Prose of Philip Thompson, ed. Gideon Rappaport (San Diego: One Mind Good Press, 2005), p. 221, 227. Questions? …
 
Series II, Podcast P: Richard III Scourge of God "Despair and Die" End of the Wars of the Roses Notes: Two quotations come from Anthony Hammond, Introduction to King Richard III, The Arden Shakespeare (London: Methuen, 1981): The More description is on p. 78; the Spivack quotations (citing Bernard Spivack, Shakespeare and the Allegory of Evil [New …
 
Series II, Podcast O: Introduction to Shakespeare's History Plays Notes: The Thompson quotations are from “Notes on Shakespeare” in Philip Thompson, Dusk and Dawn: Poems and Prose of Philip Thompson, ed. Gideon Rappaport (San Diego: One Mind Good Press, 2005), p. 221, 227. The Robie Macauley quotation is from his introduction to Ford Madox Ford, Pa…
 
Series I, Chapter 11: What Is a Sonnet For? What is a poem? What is a sonnet? Shakespeare's Sonnets Did Shakespeare really mean it? How long did it take him to write one? To whom did he write them? Was Shakespeare gay? Notes: The Robert Frost quotation is from Newsweek, January 30, 1956, p. 56, accessed 7/5/18 at http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilr…
 
Series II, Podcast N: Antony and Cleopatra Rome and Egypt Reason and Passion Particulars and the Universal 5 Key Lines 12 Specific Notes Notes: The Thompson quotation is from Reflections (Literary and Philosophical) in Philip Thompson, Dusk and Dawn: Poems and Prose of Philip Thompson, ed. Gideon Rappaport (San Diego: One Mind Good Press, 2005), p.…
 
Series I, Chapter 10: What Kind of Thing Is It? Categories of Plays Session 2: Histories, Romances, Satire Histories Romances One Satire False Category: Problem Plays Notes: The Halliday quotation is from F.E. Halliday, A Shakespeare Companion 1564–1964 (Baltimore: Penguin, 1964), p. 350. The Boas reference is to F. S. Boas, Shakespeare and His Pre…
 
Series I, Chapter 10: What Kind of Thing Is It? Categories of Plays Session1: Tragedies and Comedies Revenge Tragedies De Casibus Tragedies Domestic Tragedies Comic Relief Notes: The quotation from Morton Bloomfield is from a from a lecture series entitled “Medieval and Renaissance Tragedy and Notions of Tragedy” delivered at Brandeis University, S…
 
Series II, Podcast K: Othello Psychomachia Demonic Iago, Angelic Desdemona Repentance vs. Suicide 3 Key Lines 6 Specific Notes Notes: The quotation of Thomas Mann is from Thomas Mann, Joseph and His Brothers, tr. John E. Woods (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Everyman’s Library, 2005), p. 669. For the Donald Duck psychomachia see “Donald’s Better Self” …
 
Series I, Chapter 9: Is This What Shakespeare Actually Wrote? Shakespeare's Texts Manuscripts Early Printed Editions: Good and Bad Quartos, Folio Later Editions Modern Editions Notes: Facsimile edition of the Quartos: Michael J.B. Allen and Kenneth Muir, Shakespeare’s Plays in Quarto (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981). Facsimile editi…
 
Series II, Podcast I: Julius Caesar Shakespeare inherits both pro- and anti-Caesar traditions The body of Caesar vs. the spirit of Caesar Notes: The Sayers quotation is from notes on the major images in Canto XXXIV in Dorothy Sayers, tr., The Comedy of Dante Alighieri the Florentine, Cantica I, Hell (London: Penguin, 1949), p. 289. On the anti-Caes…
 
Series II, Podcast G: Measure for Measure A discussion of one of Shakespeare's greatest comedies. The wedding of Justice and Mercy. The source of two of the Thompson quotations is Philip Thompson, Dusk and Dawn: Poems and Prose of Philip Thompson, ed. Gideon Rappaport (San Diego: One Mind Good Press, 2005), pp. 223–26; a third quotation was heard i…
 
Series I, Chapter 7: Why All the Footnotes? Shakespeare's Mental Furniture Session 5: Decorum Realism or Morality Play? "Foreground Is Background" References in the section on Decorum are to Madeleine Doran, Endeavors of Art: A Study of Form in Elizabethan Drama, (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1964), p. 217–218, and to George Puttenham, A…
 
Series I, Chapter 7: Why all the Footnotes? Shakespeare's Mental Furniture Session 3: The Doctrine of Correspondence Authority Christianity Renaissance Humanism and Classicism Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.com저자 Doctor Rap
 
Series I, Chapter 7: Why All the Footnotes? Shakespeare's Mental Furniture Session 2: The Human Order: Monarchy vs. Democracy The Two Bodies of the King The Family The Individual Soul and Body The Humors The Five Wits Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.com저자 Doctor Rap
 
Series I, Chapter 7: Why All the Footnotes? Shakespeare's Mental Furniture, Session 1: Words We Know Words We Don't Know Shakespeare and Electricity The Medieval Synthesis The Cosmic Hierarchy Notes: The reference to Lewis is to C.S. Lewis, The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University …
 
Series II, Podcast D: As You Like It New prelude/postlude: Chopin, Piano Concerto No. 1, Op. 11, Third Movement, quartet version, in the public domain. Upcoming, Why All the Footnotes: Shakespeare's Mental Furniture with a better mic. Thanks for technical and other help to N. A., A. G., J. G., F. H., and A. R. Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.co…
 
Series I, Chapter 6: Unity in Variety, Session 3: Setting, Theme, Audience The third session in the chapter on Unity in Variety looks at settings, themes, and then brings in the audience as contributor to the unity of a play. Coming next, As You Like It, with a format upgrade: Prelude and postlude. Questions? Email DoctorRap@zohomail.com.…
 
Series I, Chapter 6: Why the play's the thing: Unity in Variety, Session 1 Unity and meaning Shakespeare and the hologram All roads lead to meaning Words Images In the next session we'll look at figures of speech, action, scene, character, and plot. In the third session, we'll look at setting and theme and then at the audience.…
 
Series I, Chapter 4: Shakespeare's Language, Session 4: Rhetorical Devices: Variation in Speech Did Shakespeare's audience get it all? Coming next: The Merchant of Venice Shakespeare's Characters Questions? email DoctorRap@zohomail.com저자 Doctor Rap
 
Series I, Chapter 4: Shakespeare's Language, Session 3 Rhetorical devices rooted in sound: Repetition Rhyme Alliteration Assonance Consonance Rhetorical devices rooted in structure: Antithesis Repetition of Syntax Chiasmus End-stopped and Enjambed lines To come next: Variation in Speech Questions: email DoctorRap@zohomail.com…
 
Did People Really Talk Like That? Shakespeare's Language Session 1 of four on Shakespeare's Language: What is poetry for? Is it Verse or Prose? Rhetorical devices rooted in meaning: Metaphor and Simile. To come: Session 2: rhetorical devices rooted in sound: Onomatopoeia, Meter, and Rhythm. Session 3; repetition of sounds; rhetorical devices rooted…
 
Series II, Podcast B: A Midsummer Night's Dream A discussion of one of Shakespeare's most lyrical plays. Rhetoric as the vehicle of emotion. The nature of love. Expect most uploads on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Coming up, Shakespeare's Language. Questions? email DoctorRap@zohomail.com저자 G Rap
 
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