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American Shadows is a bi-weekly podcast from iHeartRadio and Aaron Mahnke’s Grim & Mild. The show focuses on the darker stories from American history: the people, places, and things that are hidden and forgotten in the shadows. From better-known tales like the conspiracy to steal Lincoln’s body, to less-known stories, like the rainmaker who flooded San Diego. Join host Lauren Vogelbaum as she spans two centuries of omitted lore from our country’s history books.
 
The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind Tides Of History, Fall Of Rome and ...
 
For history lovers who listen to podcasts, History Unplugged is the most comprehensive show of its kind. It's the only show that dedicates episodes to both interviewing experts and answering questions from its audience. First, it features a call-in show where you can ask our resident historian (Scott Rank, PhD) absolutely anything (What was it like to be a Turkish sultan with four wives and twelve concubines? If you were sent back in time, how would you kill Hitler?). Second, it features lon ...
 
The American History Podcast presents the history of the United States in an engaging, scholarly and entertaining way. Each season we take a topic in American history and dive deep to discover the roots of the issue, and provide our listeners with a lot of history they don't know. Follow the American History Podcast on Twitter: @americanhiscast. Feel free to email me with questions and comments: shawn@theamericanhistorypodcast.com
 
In a culture obsessed with winning, "American Loser" is the podcast that puts the spotlight firmly on second place. Comedian KP Burke and his handsome Father dive head first into the true stories of the biggest losers in American History. Our theme song is "American Loser" by the supremely talented Robert Rolfe Feddersen. All episodes recorded at A Shared Universe Podcast Studio in Eatontown, New Jersey
 
A podcast dedicated to reducing your American History Anxiety. 2020/21 has been a rough year, and the last thing you need to stress about is how much US history you can remember. I taught AP US history for many years, let me tell you stuff I know, stuff you need to know, and take the anxiety down a notch. Even if you're not an US history student, I'll present you with a calm and solid foundation of US history without hyperbole.
 
BHM365 is a weekly podcast series that explores the true account of African American History as American History. Hosted by author and marketplace entrepreneur Jo Anne Scaife, this podcast dives into the revolutionary research found in “Black History 365: An Inclusive Account of American History” a seminal work by Dr. Walter Milton, Jr. and Dr. Joel Freeman. Featuring weekly interviews with history makers and current influencers, special ‘round table’ talks and series, as well as community f ...
 
War has played a key role in the history of the United States from the nation’s founding right down to the present. Wars made the U. S. independent, kept it together, increased its size, and established it as a global superpower. Understanding America’s wars is essential for understanding American history. In the Key Battles of American History, host James Early discusses American history through the lens of the most important battles of America’s wars. James is an Adjunct Professor of Histo ...
 
Americans love sports. We are fanatics who dress in team colors, root, root, root for the home team, and live and die with the success and failure of our favorite athlete. But if we take the time to look beneath the surface and beyond the simple factual question of who won and who lost, we are also presented with some of the most fascinating stories from our nation’s past. In this new podcast series Professor Matt Andrews goes beyond telling entertaining tales of races won, touchdowns scored ...
 
The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world.
 
On February 10th, 1796, Vice President John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail, lamenting the state of discourse in the country. The election was nearing—and becoming heated. Newspapers screamed, factions warred, and John Adams was dismayed with what he called “the wicked Game.” Americans in 2020 can relate. They still have to endure weeks of shouting, outrage, and the worst sort of political rancor as the country once again chooses its president. But it’s almost always been this way. And to pr ...
 
The JuntoCast is a monthly podcast about early American history. Each episode features a roundtable discussion by academic historians, Ken Owen, Michael Hattem, Roy Rogers, and guest panelists, exploring a single aspect of early American history in depth. The JuntoCast brings the current knowledge of academic historians to a broad audience in an informal, conversational format that is intellectually engaging, educational, and entertaining.
 
The Latin American History Podcast aims to tell the story of Spanish and Portuguese America from its very beginnings up until the present day. Latin America’s history is home to some of the most exciting and unbelievable stories of adventure and exploration, and this podcast will tell these stories in all their glory. It will examine colonial society, slavery, and what life was like for the region’s inhabitants during this period. We will look at what caused the wars of independence, how the ...
 
Many books describe the role of men during American history. However, at the same time, women did much: comforted, fought, helped, raised children, and much more. This book is full of mini-biographies of women in many places, and many ages- each chapter telling about a different subject. (Summary by Stav Nisser)
 
DNA science. Artificial intelligence. Smartphones and 3D printers. Science and technology have transformed the world we live in. But how did we get here? It wasn’t by accident. Well, sometimes it was. It was also the result of hard work, teamwork, and competition. And incredibly surprising moments. Hosted by bestselling author Steven Johnson (“How We Got To Now”), American Innovations uses immersive scenes to tell the stories of the scientists, engineers, and ordinary people behind the great ...
 
The Huntington’s early American historical collections are important resources for the study of the Colonial and Revolutionary periods, the drafting of the Constitution, and the Civil War. Among the holdings are hundreds of autograph letters written by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, as well as the manuscript of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography. The Huntington can also claim the largest collection of autograph manuscripts of Abraham Lincoln west of Illinois. In conferences, seminars ...
 
A weekly (term-time) podcast featuring brief interviews with the presenters at the Cambridge American History Seminar. We talk about presenters' current research and paper, their broader academic interests as well as a few more general questions. If you have any feedback, suggestions or questions, contact us via Twitter @camericanist or via email ltd27@cam.ac.uk . Thanks for listening!
 
We’re a site that creates a variety of exclusive modern international and American history content! We create free history audio podcasts as part of History in 28-minutes, a magazine called History is Now, and books as part of Required History. Our works explain some of history's most important events concisely and quickly.
 
In this book, Burton Egbert Stevenson writes a brief biography of some of the most noteworthy men in American history. He begins at the very beginning of the history of America with Christopher Columbus and proceeds forward with the story of people who made America what it is today by their respective vocations. It is interesting to note that the vast majority of the subjects started in poverty and excelled financially and in stature.He makes something that could be very dull, a very readabl ...
 
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show series
 
In order to meet the needs of its expanding population and empire, Japan’s leaders began looking hungrily to the south and east. Three years after invading China, Japanese military forces occupied French Indochina. This, combined with American support for China, put Japan on a collision course with the US. Would the two powers be able to avoid war?…
 
On October 17th, 1859, John Brown was barricaded inside the federal armory at Harpers Ferry with his hostages and his remaining followers. His attempt to lead an antislavery insurrection had failed. A detachment of U.S. Marines led by Colonel Robert E. Lee had the armory surrounded. For the radical abolitionist, it was his last stand. But after he …
 
Today we discuss the end of the New Deal and its' critics in the 1930s. Yes, there were (and still are) critics of FDR's policies. Huge thanks to Podcorn for sponsoring this episode. Explore sponsorship opportunities and start monetizing your podcast by signing up here: https://podcorn.com/podcasters/ Thank you very much to Wooga's new podcast June…
 
Sunday Memoirs Church and Business Operating Together Part 2 featuring Reverend Dr. Richard Henry Boyd A reading from BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History textbook on the Black Church. Sunday Memoirs takes a look back in the past to find inspiration for the future. We will take time to share great inspiring accounts and building moments …
 
Professor Alan Kraut lectured at American University on the economic progress made by the South during the 1920s as part of his history course on the South since Reconstruction. He said that at half a century after the Civil War it was necessary for the South to turn from its past in order to chart a new future. Learn more about your ad choices. Vi…
 
Philadelphia is often referred to as the birthplace of a nation, but it would also be fair to say that it was the birthplace of American espionage. Today’s guests, Keith Melton and Robert Wallace, author of Spy Sites of Philadelphia, discuss the city’s secret history from the nation’s founding to the present. Throughout the Revolutionary War, Patri…
 
Welcome to Episode 24 of the Asian American History 101 podcast! Gen & Ted share the history of Angel Island… the “Ellis Island of the West”. But was it really as welcoming? Why was it built? Before that, we begin the episode by addressing the history of hate in Orange County, CA and specifically Huntington Beach. We also talk a little about some o…
 
Learn how the Second Continental Congress called upon the Supreme Judge of the World to support its actions. Understand how colonies and local governments had already declared independence before July 4th, how colonies addressed the issue of independence at Congress, and how Congress moved forward with Richard Henry Lee's resolution for independenc…
 
Listen while Mel Hankla joins Kent Masterson Brown to discuss his book, “Into the Bluegrass: Art and Artistry of Kentucky’s Historic Icons,” an incredible publication about the cultural fabric of Early Kentucky as shown in its art and artifacts, such as the Kentucky longrifle, pottery, silver, and furniture.…
 
Charnetta Barnes CEO and President of Barnes and Napier Agency Vice President of Senior Life Insurance Company A Two Part interview with Charnetta Barnes A Focus on Mother's in the Month of May Celebrate this great mother/women history-maker The month of May we will turn our eye's towards mother's from past, present, and future that worked hard and…
 
The first part of our new mini-series Road Trip to Long Island featuring tales of historic sites outside of New York City. In this episode, relive a little Jazz Age luxury by escaping into the colossal castles, manors and chateaus on Long Island's North Shore, the setting for one of America's most famous novels. The world is perhaps most familiar w…
 
In the 1980s, computers, now more powerful and more affordable, become a bigger part of people’s work and life. And that makes hackers a greater threat. America’s laws are slow to keep up with this new form of break-in. Then, an incorrigible teenager with a talent for computers gets caught in the country’s shifting views of hacking, and becomes the…
 
In 1897, the United States was mired in the worst economic depression that the country had yet endured. When newspapers announced that gold was to be found in wildly enriching quantities at the Klondike River region of the Yukon, a mob of economically desperate Americans swarmed north. Within weeks, tens of thousands of them were embarking towards …
 
Richard Nixon entered office during one of the most tumultuous times in American history. And he had a bold agenda to remake his country’s foreign policy. For the first time, a new form of realism would dictate America’s Cold War strategy. The first test of this new worldview would occur in the jungles of Vietnam. Follow Website: thisamericanpresid…
 
USA v. All Y’All Where did the Modern Olympic Games comes from? Why do athletes have to compete as representatives of nations? And what would happen if the United States hosted an Olympic Games and nobody showed up? [Spoiler alert: people died] Bibliography:Jules Boykoff, Power Games: A Political History of the Olympic Games (New York and London: V…
 
Howard Unruh etched his names in the history books by going from decorated WW2 veteran to one of America's First Mass Shooters....his story is brutal but important and we find a few ways to make fun of him in the mean time. Big Rich From Jersey joins us to discuss this "Loser" who ruined Camden, New Jersey's Good Name!…
 
It is remarkable now to imagine, but during the 1870s, the American West, for all its cloud-topped peaks and endless coastline, might have been barren tundra as far as most Americans knew. In 1869, the first transcontinental railroad had made history by linking East and West, but, relying heavily on federal grants, it left an opening for two brash …
 
12 Things the Negro Must Do Nannie Helen Burroughs A reading from the "The Elephant Experience" in the book BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History 1) The Negro must learn to put first things first. 2) The Negro must stop expecting God and While folk to do for him what he can do for himself. 3) The Negro must keep himself, his children and …
 
Charnetta Barnes CEO and President of Barnes and Napier Agency Vice President of Senior Life Insurance Company A Two Part interview with Charnetta Barnes A Focus on Mother's in the Month of May Celebrate this great mother/women history-maker The month of May we will turn our eye's towards mother's from past, present, and future that worked hard and…
 
Coney Island is back! After being closed for 2020 due to the pandemic, the unusual attractions, the thrilling rides and the stands selling delicious beer and hot dogs have finally reopened. So we are releasing this very special version of our 2018 show called Landmarks of Coney Island — special, because this is an extended version of that show feat…
 
Hackers: the criminals who prey on our digital lives. Today they steal credit cards and personal information, or even commit acts of cyber-terrorism. But in the early days, hackers were largely seen as harmless pranksters. And it wasn’t computers they were initially interested in, but phones -- which they hacked with a mysterious device called the …
 
In the spring of 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson had a decision to make. Just months after moving into the White House under the worst of circumstances—following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy—he had to decide whether to run to win the presidency in his own right. He turned to his most reliable, trusted political strategist: his w…
 
As late as the 1860s, Japan was a semi-feudal nation, largely cut off from the rest of the world. But within a few decades, the nation had transformed itself into a major industrial power with one of the world’s most well-trained, well-equipped, and well-led militaries. Between 1905 and 1941, Japan defeated Russia, gained several former German colo…
 
In December 1858, John Brown was back in Kansas and Missouri, making headlines for dramatic and deadly raids on plantations. He and his followers freed 11 enslaved men and women and led them on an 1,100-mile journey to freedom in Canada. But all the while, Brown was focused on finally launching his long-planned attack on slavery in Harpers Ferry, V…
 
“Civil War on the Racetrack” In the years leading up to the Civil War, North and South put their pride and prestige on the line in a series of intersectional horse races. Fueled by the passions of the debate over slavery in the United States, these were the events that sparked our modern American mania for sport.Bibliography:Melvin Adelman, A Sport…
 
Listen now: wondery.fm/1865season2 April 15, 1865. President Lincoln is dead and the country in turmoil. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton takes control, determined to bring the assassin to justice—but the hunt for John Wilkes Booth isn’t all that grips Stanton. Lincoln’s successor, Vice President Andrew Johnson, is likely to bend to southern interest…
 
Listen now: wondery.fm/1865season2 April 15, 1865. President Lincoln is dead and the country in turmoil. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton takes control, determined to bring the assassin to justice—but the hunt for John Wilkes Booth isn’t all that grips Stanton. Lincoln’s successor, Vice President Andrew Johnson, is likely to bend to southern interest…
 
Sports are as American as apple pie, yet even they have become a part of the political landscape. For decades, presidents have appeared at sporting events, and championship teams and gold medal winners have been invited to visit the White House. This wasn't always the case and you may be surprised to know that Richard Nixon was a pivotal figure in …
 
Sunday Memoirs Church and Business Operating Together Part 1 featuring Reverend Dr. Richard Henry Boyd A reading from BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History textbook on the Black Church. Sunday Memoirs takes a look back in the past to find inspiration for the future. We will take time to share great inspiring accounts and building moments …
 
Bruno Mars American Singer His Quote: “All American music is black music. When you “Black Music” understand that you are talking about rock, jazz, R&B, reggae, funk, doo-wop, hip hop, and Motown. Even salsa music stems back in the Motherland. Black music is what gives America its “Swag”. (Bruno Mars) Peter Gene Hernandez (born October 8, 1985), kno…
 
Nature and history intertwine in all five boroughs -- from The Bronx River to the shores of Staten Island -- in this special episode about New York City's many botanical gardens. A botanical garden is more than just a pretty place; it's a collection of plant life for the purposes of preservation, education and study. But in an urban environment lik…
 
In 1947, Chuck Yeager made history when he flew faster than the speed of sound. But was he really the first to do it? On this episode, Steven talks to aviation historian and retired fighter pilot Dan Hampton, whose book “Chasing the Demon” presents an alternate history of the quest to reach Mach 1. Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all epi…
 
Before Bonnie and Clyde, there was another criminal couple capturing America’s attention. Baltimore sweethearts, Margaret and Richard Whittemore, made tabloids across the country as Tiger Girl and The Candy Kid during the 1920s for stealing millions of dollars’ worth of diamonds and precious gems along with Americans’ hearts. Todays guest, Glenn St…
 
Good news! Next week James Early and I launch a 35-part series called Key Battles of the Pacific Theater (WW2). You won't hear it on this podcast but on James's new show called Key Battles of American History. You can find it on the podcast player of your choice, or go over to keybattlesofamericanhistory.com.…
 
On the night of May 24th, 1856, radical abolitionist John Brown and seven of his followers crept along the banks of Kansas’s Pottawatomie Creek and stormed a proslavery settlement. They dragged five men from their cabins and killed them in cold blood. Soon, Brown’s name was splashed across the nation’s newspapers, making him a lightning rod for con…
 
On January 20, 1969, Richard Nixon delivered his first inaugural address—the culmination of one of the greatest comebacks in American political history. After losing the 1960 election to John F. Kennedy and then the 1962 California gubernatorial election, Nixon's political career was all but over. Although history remembers him as a controversial p…
 
As far back as America’s colonial period, educated residents were fascinated with Iran (or Persia, as it was known). The Persian Empire was subject of great admiration by Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams. Iranians returned the favor. They thought the American model was an ideal one to copy for their own government. 19th century American missi…
 
Welcome to Episode 23 of the Asian American History 101 podcast! Gen & Ted begin by talking about Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and his recent Hollywood Reporter article on the need for better media roles for Asian Americans. This is also the next episode focused on Asian food in America. This week, we’re talking about Indian food. We provide a little histor…
 
Today we look at FDR's New Deal. It's been a long time coming, and this episode is quite large, but we think it is worth it. Enjoy! This episode is sponsored by Wooga's new podcast June's Journey. Check it out at: June's Journey Remember, the official beard products company of the show is Fable Beard Company. They have amazing products for great pr…
 
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